Have you ever heard a song at mass that moved you to tears?


#1

Please tell me the name of the song, and if possible the composer


#2

Many years ago, our cantor at my cathedral parish was a gifted classically trained soprano. Her acapella version of the African-American spiritual “Were You There When They Crucified My Lord?” sung only on Good Friday and only during the Veneration of the Cross reduced many to tears - as in you could hear people crying (myself included).


#3

“On Eagle’s Wings” but this was at a funeral mass.


#4

“Refiner’s Fire” - Communion Meditation when everyone is in quiet prayer, including the priest.


#5

I Am the Bread of Life (Suzanne Toolan), sung as a Communion meditation during a men’s Cursillo Mass, way back in the late 1970s. That song has stuck with me, and so it is written in my funeral Mass wishes, that I would like it to be sung after Communion.


#6

Ditto here.


#7

Were You There (especially when it is sung a capella and only by one person)


#8

Victoria Improperia, Good Friday. “O my people, what have I done to you? And wherein have I offended you?”


#9

Bread of Angels by Curtis Stephan (an adaptation of Panis Angelicus using English and Latin)

The Gloria depending on the arrangment used


#10

Our cantor was a professionally trained soprano and African American. Good Friday during the Veneration of the Cross…“Were you there?” sung acapella,

Mike we also sang the Improperia as well. Rene, however, reduced all to tears.


#11

Yes, back in 78’ our eight grade class we sang

“I never promised you a rose garden”

I balled like a baby it was so horrible :mad: :eek: :mad: :eek: :mad:


#12

Yes, the Pange Lingua. Don’t know the composer. I remember one Good Friday. The church was packed. The priest processed slowly around the church with the Monstrance containing the Body of Christ
We sang the Pange Lingua slowly. It was so sad and sorrowful. I cried as I sang. It was a moment I will always remember. It touched my heart as I contempleted His Passion and death.


#13

#14

At my first Mass as a returning Catholic, the Communion hymn was “Hosea”. The refrain was “long have I waited for your coming home to me and living deeply our new love.”


#15

Tantum Ergo after this year’s Holy Thursday Mass of the Lord’s Supper.
For the main part of the Mass it was Haugen/Haas, but then, afterwards (inexplicably) the actual Latin Tantum Ergo. It absolutely made me forget everything that had been sung up to that point. The entire atmosphere went from happy-clappy to reverent in seconds.


#16

Too many to list them all! I pray through song alone and even choke myself up then. Most Christmas hymns will do it, Eagles Wings, Were You There… oh gosh and I’m blanking but that one we sing during Advent…

sojo


#17

Step by Step by Rich Mullins (a future Catholic taken before his time)

Were you there is another one that has already been mentioned.

Above All


#18

There is a song in spanish that is sometimes sung at our 8 am and 12 pm masses. It is solemn and it includes the words (my translation) “…but first, I will make you walk through fire…”

Whenever I hear this, my Lord, I feel so close to You. I can’t recall much of the other verses and I’m afraid I have not done it justice just now…If I could sit and listen to the music of the liturgy all day, it would be a day full of blessings for me… What a privilege it is to be Catholic!


#19

The songe “Abba, Father.” That song has moved me to tears more than once.

"Abba Father

[LEFT]Chorus: *
***Abba, Abba Father, You are the potter, We are the clay, the work of Your hands.
**[/LEFT]

[LEFT]Mold us, mold us and fashion us
Into the image of Jesus Your Son,
Of Jesus your Son.[/LEFT]

[LEFT]Chorus[/LEFT]

[LEFT]Father, may we be one in You,
May we be one in You,
As He is in You and You are in Him.[/LEFT]

[LEFT]Chorus[/LEFT]

[LEFT]Glory, Glory and praise to You,
Glory and praise to You,
Forever, Amen, Forever Amen.[/LEFT]

[LEFT]Chorus"[/LEFT]
[RIGHT]Author: Rev. Carey Landry[/RIGHT]


#20

I could be very wrong, but I think that is attributed to St. Thomas Aquinas, in the twelfth or thirteenth century.


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