Have you moved from a blue to a red state (or vice versa)?

I’d like to hear from people who have moved from “blue” to “red” states, or vice versa, within the last 20 years. First a word of explanation.

By “blue” state I mean one in which state government and laws are dominated by liberal points of view (best known examples are probably Mass., NY, Calif. and Ill.). By “red” state I mean those in which state government and laws tend to be more conservative (Texas, most Southern states). I do NOT mean specifically Democrat or Republican – a Democrat in a red state may be farther to the right, for example, than a Republican from a blue state. Nor am I necessarily referring to the way each state voted in recent presidential elections.

What I want to know is whether or not such a move really makes a practical difference in one’s daily life or ability to raise a family. Here’s what I’d like to know:

  1. When did you move? What state/city did you leave and where did you move to?

  2. Why did you move? Was it purely for personal reasons (job change, being closer to family, desire for a particular climate or natural environment) or did governmental issues like taxes and laws play a part in your decision?

  3. Have you noticed a difference in the amount of governmental involvement or intrusion in your life since you moved? Are your taxes noticeably different (not just income but sales and property taxes also?) Is the cost of living different? Is it easier or harder to find a job or start a business? Can you do things you could not do before (e.g., obtain a concealed carry permit)?

  4. Have you seen a difference in the quality of governmental services or public accommodations – e.g. schools, parks, roads, public facilities, resources for the elderly or handicapped, etc.?

  5. Are you happier or better off where you are now? Or would you go back to your former residence if possible?

  6. What do you like most and dislike most about where you live now, and the place you left?

  7. Have you seen any appreciable difference in – for lack of a better term – the quality of Catholic life? Is the Church growing, shrinking or staying the same where you are now? Do you have better access to Catholic parishes or education than you did before?

Goodness yes - I moved from Vermont (which is liberal-with-a-capital-L) to Kentucky (which is certainly “red”) last year.

  1. Last year, and I moved from a small town in VT, into a decently-sized city in KY (which feels like a HUGE city to me!!)

  2. I moved because my husband lived here, and we got married here last year. We thought about living in Vermont (and, in some ways, I’d still prefer to do so), but it’s more practical for us to live here. More affordable, better services, better Catholic community, better place to raise kids…and, yes, we like the more conservative atmosphere.

  3. Yes, cost of living is better here, the job situation is better here, blah, blah, blah…but I’d attribute that to the higher population of people, rather than liberal vs. conservative policies. Government does seem less involved. I can’t really speak to taxes, as my situation is too complicated, and I haven’t lived here a full year, taxwise, yet.

  4. Hard to answer. There are lots of services and accommodations here…but, there are FAR more people here - as many in this city as there are in the whole STATE of Vermont. I think that, for the size and budget, Vermont does a remarkable job. Probably better than here in KY.

  5. Am I happier? No. Am I better off? Probably. Would I go back to Vermont? I wish we could, but, like I said, this is a better place for us.

  6. KY - I like the Catholic community, conservative atmosphere, and closeness of services. I dislike the climate, and living in a city. VT - I like the rural atmosphere, the climate, and the uniqueness of the Yankee style. I dislike the liberalness of the state (UGH!!)

  7. Huge, gigantic, enormous difference. In Vermont, I was used to dying parishes with no young people, parishes unable to meet operating budgets and therefore within danger of closing, parishes without priests (most priests have to handle 2, 3, or more parishes, often driving great distances), imported priests (since VT doesn’t ordain many new ones). I was used to being the only one in line for confession, just about the only practicing Catholic at my “Catholic” college, etc. I was used to hearing my politicians say “I’m Catholic, but of course I’m voting for gay marriage, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, whatever” (AAUGH!!).

Here in KY, the parishes are much more vibrant, with more young people. My parish has confession several times a week, with 2 priests, and there are still often long lines. We have a Latin mass community. There are tons of church activities. True, most of this is due to being in a city, versus the country…but there’s still a noticeable difference.

Yes, I moved from TX to WI 8 years ago because I married a WI resident.

WI is kinda purple at the moment. It is the birthplace of progressivism, it typically leans left, with certain geographic exceptions. The particular county I live in is totally blue.

I am NOT blue.

Taxes here are sky high both income and property, personal freedom is intruded upon daily, bureacracy is ridiculous, starting a business (of which my husbad and I have two) is a paperwork nightmare. Our county government is pitiful, wasting money on all sorts of stuff while basic services could really be better. And don’t get me started on the unions here.

I moved from a large city to a rural area, so the Catholic church is much smaller, and the population is shrinking here b/c of no jobs. It is not growing.

So, yeah, I lobby to go back to TX all the time.

Nope, have been living in a red state my entire life. Although I must admit I don’t like everything that republicans stand for, I would be a hypocrite statement for me that I approve that democrats do.

Ahh yes, the platforms of both need a lot to be desired, nothing or no one is ever perfect, We pray, Peace, Carlan

I moved from a blueish purple state (also known as a battleground state,) to a deep maroon state.

  1. Why did you move? Was it purely for personal reasons (job change, being closer to family, desire for a particular climate or natural environment) or did governmental issues like taxes and laws play a part in your decision?

We moved for a job.

  1. Have you noticed a difference in the amount of governmental involvement or intrusion in your life since you moved? Are your taxes noticeably different (not just income but sales and property taxes also?) Is the cost of living different? Is it easier or harder to find a job or start a business? Can you do things you could not do before (e.g., obtain a concealed carry permit)?

Taxes are different. We pay about 1/3 of the property taxes we did before. (Yes, the mil rate is lower). But we pay taxes on food here, where we didn’t “back home.” Our current state is a right-to-work state. And although my husband doesn’t work at what would be a union job, there are jobs here. And there are companies building factories here. I have a carry permit for both states.

  1. Have you seen a difference in the quality of governmental services or public accommodations – e.g. schools, parks, roads, public facilities, resources for the elderly or handicapped, etc.?

We have much better services here. That probably has more to do with the size of the town, than being red or blue.

  1. Are you happier or better off where you are now? Or would you go back to your former residence if possible?

We are much happier here. If I won a million $$ I wouldn’t move back.

  1. What do you like most and dislike most about where you live now, and the place you left?

I live in the South, and it isn’t stereotyping to say they are friendlier in the South. But I do miss the snow of the North. :o

  1. Have you seen any appreciable difference in – for lack of a better term – the quality of Catholic life? Is the Church growing, shrinking or staying the same where you are now? Do you have better access to Catholic parishes or education than you did before?

Our parish wasn’t very friendly back home. We tried to reach out and make friends, but people seemed more interested in getting in their cars. It is very different here. One story I tell is that when we had our child, the only person to deliver a meal was my Mom. I didn’t think anything about it until my husband was in the hospital in our new state. When he came home, we had a week of meals delivered. Every day, someone would stop by with a delivery. It was incredible.

Now that doesn’t sound like an answer about “Catholic” life. But think about it. These people here, are putting their Catholic faith into action. :thumbsup:

I moved from a blue state to a purple state for school and ended up staying. It is nice not to have the state government constantly overreaching (and not having governors habitually wind up in jail ;)). But most of the differences have to do with the economics and demographics of the regions rather than the state politics.

If I could, I’d probably move back just to be closer to friends and family. But where I’m at now is still a good place to be. The Catholic communities in both places were/are wonderful. No complaints about that.

I moved from Miami, Fl (because of Cubans south Fl is heavily republican) to MA. I was about eight years ago and basically I was following my then husband. As to taxes, well they call Massachusetts taxachusets for a reason, so I suppose the name taxachusets answers the tax question LOL. The cost of living of course is much more expensive in the North East than anywhere in the South. However as to jobs and starting businesses MA is in much better shape than Fl. As to if I would like to go back I do certainly miss Fl and I think I like it better, hey who doesn’t love Miami!!! Beaches, food, I like the people better, is prettier, no winter, I am Hispanic, etc.! but it would be extremely difficult for me to go back. What I dislike the most about MA…people here are weird…seriously and no offense to any other person from MA but yes people are weird, I am still trying to get them. As to the church my understanding is that given the problem.of sex abuse cases the church suffered here, when I was looking for a catholic pre school for my daughter couldn’t find one and I was told most of them closed. Also many parishes closed specially in the north shore, but I have to say I still found quite a good community in the north shore and good churches. The south shore it appears to me that there is a church on every corner. However I don’t know if it is because in Fl I used to go to Spanish masses or due to Hispanic influence but Catholics there seemed more conservative.

I’ve lived in the bluest of blue states…The People’s Republic of Massachusetts…for the vast majority of my life.
Due to the military, I’ve moonlighted in a few red states…notably Texas and Missouri…for short periods of time…but not enough to make a comparison.

Our taxes are crazy up here. Some towns and cities are better then others, in regards to property taxes…my husband and I own a house in a small town and our property taxes are pretty low. My sister and her husband live in a town of roughly the same size and also on the water (like us) but their taxes are outrageous.

I will say this. Though I totally disagree with the politics of this state in every way you could imagine (hubby and I haven’t been able to vote in a state or local election in awhile due to abortion and gay marriage platforms for each party) there are other reasons why I stay.

The public school system is pretty good…academic wise.
Yes, the social policies and secularism in these schools are just awful and I won’t be sending my children to the schools based on those reasons alone…but I went to public schools in this state and received a very good education.

The Catholic schools…by extension…are also quite good academically.

Obviously…colleges in our state are excellent. The state schools are excellent too.

The health care system in this state is very good. The hospitals are world-renowned and absolutely outstanding. This is another reason why we stay. We have good doctors and good hospitals all within an hours drive.

Also…for whatever reason (I seriously don’t know why this is) where I live…Catholicism is absolutely thriving.
We have parishes with multiply masses at every corner with packed parking lots every Sunday.
I actually drive by two Churches to go to my Parish (only 8 mins from my house) in order to attend a more Orthodox church.
Our Church has no debt, a wonderful school, lots of young families and tons of activities.
It’s fantastic.

LOL I am telling you, taxachusetts!! Though I’ve heard the property taxes in NH are much worst.

I have lived here in Colo.for forty some years.I didn’t have to move…my state once very red,moved from this to purple and is now very blue…:frowning:

Years ago, I moved from Michigan to Alaska, then back to Michigan. I moved for personal reasons. Michigan is home. However, I do miss the fierce independent spirit that I found in Alaska. There’s nothing like it in the Lower 48. I loathe the culture of entitlement in this area. However, I moved way before I ever considered being Catholic.

These days, I find solace living in a red city/red county. (And we were smart enough to elect a red legislature/governor last time around!)

My husband tells me he has his dream job here, so we stay. It has become a bigger deal to me whether we live in a red or blue city/county, given what I’ve seen around the Metro Detroit area.

There are some nice areas that are off my list because I simply will not live in Detroit/Wayne County or an overwhelmingly “blue” area. Competent county/city government means a lot to me. “One party rule” not so much.

Yeah…they are and I think it’s partly because they don’t have a sale’s tax.

I was going to comment on your post anyway. I live on the south shore and Catholicism is huge down here. I’m not kidding when I say there is a church on every single corner.
I live one block down from one that has a Catholic school and my husband and I’s first apartment had another in our back yard. All in the same small town.

It’s nice being able to just walk to confession…:smiley:

I think it’s the fact that we have a very large population of culturally Catholics…the Portuguese population is huge.

Looks out window. My State doesn’t have a color.

Ed :slight_smile:

;):thumbsup:
Oh for balance and Peace, Carlan

Kal2012’s comments bring to mind the fact that political colors are not necessarily a state-wide thing. There are red parts of blue states and blue parts of red states.

My county is an evenly split county in an evenly split state.

Thanks,

Ed

In that case, it’s time for civil war between the Blue and the Grey! Oh, wait a minute… never mind.

Ed

I know!!! I do have noticed there is literally a church on every corner! I just registered my daughter into a catholic school in the south shore too! I was originally living in the north shore where many churches closed and I couldn’t find a pre K for her. Then I moved to Quincy because I work in Boston and now I am moving next month to a new town in the south shore just because I see a church everywhere and I was told catholic schools were quite good and people are more practicing so hopefully my move will be for the best :smiley:

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