Headquarters of Turkish campaign for EU membership is… a confiscated Christian building

The Telegraph

Headquarters of Turkish campaign for EU membership is… a confiscated Christian building

Turkey’s political elite is obsessed with joining the European Union. But senior players in the EU – in a rare moment of clarity amid their delusional fantasies of a federal Europe – are reluctant to let in a country which is increasingly hard to distinguish from the rest of the Islamic world. Here’s a tip for Turkish campaigners for EU membership: if you want to win over Herman Van Rompuy, best not set up your headquarters in a building confiscated from your country’s oppressed Orthodox Christian minority

Unbelievable but true: the headquarters of the Secretariat for the entry of Turkey into the European Union is a building confiscated from the Orthodox Christian community in the 90s. The building is located in Istanbul, in the well-known area of Ortakoy, under the first bridge over the Bosphorus.
Before the seizure, the building was used as a primary school for children of the minority Orthodox in Ortakoy. Here once lived a thriving Orthodox community, now non-existent because of past purges against minorities, executed by the “secular” Turkish State.

59 percent of those surveyed said non-Muslims either “should not” or “absolutely should not” be allowed to hold open meetings where they can discuss their ideas.
54 percent said non-Muslims either “should not” or “absolutely should not” be allowed to publish literature that describes their faith.
49 percent of those surveyed said they would either “absolutely” or “most likely” not support a political party that accepted people from another religion.

Certainly no disrespect to John Paul II or Pope Benedict but their policy of reaching out to Muslims as partners against secularism certainly seems to be a one-way street.

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