Help: Easter question!


#1

Many of you know that my Hubby is a convert to the faith.
Well he asked me this morning: How can it be 3 days if Christ died on Friday?

I know enough to know that it has to do with the ways the Jews counted days in Christ time.

This is what I told him, to which he replied “This is the first I’ve heard of that. Can you google it?”

I’ve tried googling and found one page that talked about how the Jews counted time but it was also an anti-catholic page. So hubby said doesn’t EWTN or that forum you post in have a thread? Can you start a thread?

I did a quick search on pass threads and didn’t see what I was looking for….

So do any of you have web-source that explains the counting of the days?

If you know of a thread on this issue please just post the link and I’ll read through it…

Thanks EVERYONE!


#2

Scripture is full of references to “three days” or the “third day”, and in many of these occurrences, “after three days” means “on the third day”, such as is found in 1 Kings 12:5,12.

In Hosea 6:2 is the clearest example of “three days” meaning “on the third day” and “after two days”: After two days he will revive us; on the third day he will raise us up, that we may live before him. Various N.T. references to “on the third day” are: Matthew 16:21; Matthew 17:23; Matthew 20:18-19; Mark 8:31; Mark 9:31; Mark 10:33-34; Luke 9:22; Luke 18:32-33; Luke 24:21,46; Acts 10:40; 1 Cor 15:4.

There’s also a Church Father writing that I saw in passing – I can’t remember who wrote it, or what it was called – that said that Jesus spent the necessary three days as quickly as possible, referring to the fact that he died on Friday and was raised early on Sunday.

Matthew 12:40 (***For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the whale, so will the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.***) can be reconciled by “N days and N nights” being a (Jewish) expression or idiom meaning “N days”, since Jesus was only in the tomb for two nights.


#3

www.catholic.com/thisrock/1999/9903chap.asp


#4

sundown Thursday to sundown Friday the first day, when the sacrifice is prefigured in the Last Supper, the Passover meal, in which the Eucharist and the sacrificial priesthood are established by Christ, and in which the sacrifice is fulfilled on Calvary, Jesus is taken from the cross and buried in the tomb

sundown on Friday, when the Sabbath begins, to sundown Saturday, the second day. Jesus is in the tomb, a day of silent grief and waiting, yet the Sabbath rest is observed.

sundown Saturday to midnight Sunday, the Third Day. The Easter Vigil begins well after sundown, when it is dark with the lighting of the Pascal fire. Jesus rises from the dead, opens the gates of heaven, frees the souls of the righteous waiting in the limbo of the fathers, and appears to many, at last to his disicples waiting in the upper room and commissions them.

"Destroy this Temple and in three days I will raise it again,"
this does not necessarily mean, “I will commence raising it after 3 days have elapsed” it means "Both the attempted destruction and the resurrection will be accomplished within the 3 days?


#5

Thanks you all for the replies.
(Especially the article from This Rock: I don’t know why I didn’t think about looking there)

Hubby doesn’t refute scripture and the 3 days.
It’s was more like how can Christ died on Friday and rose on Sunday?
That’s only 2 days and it is suppose to be 3 days.
We say in the creed….

It’s kind of funny cause he walked into the room this morning and said “There’s a problem!” and went on questioning the days as I’ve already mention.

As I’ve mention I told him it had to do with how the Jews counted days. (But I could NOT really remember the details). He said he believed me but that’s the first time he ever heard of Jews counting days different then the way we count days today. So he really wanted to see a source that would show this…

It was one of those honey I believe you, but where did you get this information moments… :smiley:

God Bless and Happy Easter.


#6

the source is the gospel accounts themselves, which clearly detail the Jewish traditions that are being observed. Read carefully all 4 passion accounts. Even more revealing is to read them in the context of the lectionary for Holy Week, because the OT readings from Palm Sunday onward are specifically about the OT tradition and prefiguring of what is happening in the gospels.


#7

I know you’re right! However it would leave him wondering still how do we know that this day was Friday and that day was Sunday.

Giving his background he has a hard time with bible studies…

Thanks again for your input and help!

God Bless and Happy Easter!


#8

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