Help finding Saints


#1

Hi guys! I’m teaching RCIA for children this year and one of my goals is to introduce them to the Saints, so I’m trying to have a Saint for each week, preferably one that kind of “goes” with the topic. I have quite a few, but I need some help for ones I’m stuck on! So please help! :smiley:

Feast of Christ the King- Rite of Welcome (When the become Catachumens and are officially on their way to being Catholic)
The Eucharist
What is Lent?
Rite of Election (They become the Elect and are approved of by the bishop)
Looking at Myself
The Way of the Cross (The Stations of the Cross)
The Lord’s Prayer
Holy Week


#2

For stations of the cross, I might try Simeon or the girl that wiped Jesus face.

Lent would be a good one to do on John the Baptist or St. Vincent DePaul.

I would work Padre Pio in somewhere.


#3

If you are teaching to children why are you calling it R.C.I.A… You do know that it stands for Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults. Maybe try C.C.D. Class, and you should have a religous education directer or teacher at your parish contact them. If not talk to your Priest.


#4

Is Simon a Saint? I found him on VERY briefly mentioned on one list, but no where else. St. Veronica, the girl who wiped Jesus’ face would work though.

I’m already using John the Baptist for the sacrament of Baptism, but St. Vincent DePaul is good.


#5

Nope, it is more definitely RCIA for children. For the purposes of baptism you are either an infant or an adult. Kids who are under 7 or so are baptized as infants. Once they have reached the age of reason, 7ish, they are considered an adult and go through the same process as the adults, RCIA. But obviously you can’t throw a 7 year old in an adult class and expect them to get as much out of it, so I’m teaching RCIA for children. :smiley:


#6

I might suggest St. Louis IX for the feast of Christus Rex.

newadvent.org/cathen/09368a.htm

Or St. Wenceslaus

newadvent.org/cathen/15587b.htm

Or maybe even St. Thomas More.

But this is for children. The above examples may not be suitable.

I might suggest looking into St. Bernardette (the girl who saw the apparitions at Lourdes) and see if you’d like to work her in there somewhere.


#7

I like these two! I have a couple of other ones that don’t quite connect either, but I thought were too important/well-known to skip, like St. Francis and St. Anthony. I’ll add her in too!

But this is for children. The above examples may not be suitable.

Ya, this is a rather interesting process. I don’t want anything to scary or crazy, not only are they kids, but they’ve had little to no church experience. And LOTS of the Saints had some pretty crazy/gruesome experiences!


#8

So these are the ones I’m down to now! Getting closer! Thanks for all the great ideas so far. :smiley:


#9

The Eucharist

St. Pascal Baylon had such a love for the Eucharist, that his relics knocked in their reliquery whenever someone said “Blessed be Jesus Christ in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar!”

He also opened his eyes at the elevation of the Host…at his funeral Mass.

Holy Week

St. Simeon of Cyrene, who carried Christ’s Cross maybe? St. Stephen Martyr, the first Martyr of the faith?

Looking at Myself

St. Therese the Little Flower? Her “little ways” could be tied into how that person themself can help spread the Love of God in small ways in their life.

The Lord’s Prayer

The Apostles, who were there when the prayer was created? Or maybe St. Dominic, who so spread the rosary? Or St. Augustine, who wrote specifically about this one prayer?


#10

One of my favorites for Holy Week is Saint Longinus, the soldier who pierced Jesus’ side with a lance and was then converted. saints.sqpn.com/saintl56.htm

Also Saint Mary Magdalene, who was at the foot of the Cross and was one of the first to see the risen Jesus. saints.sqpn.com/saintm11.htm

I like Tarcisus for reverence for the Holy Eucharist. saints.sqpn.com/saintt08.htm


#11

Thanks, I like him, he will be great for the Eucharist. Then we can also talk a bit about adoration. :thumbsup:

St. Therese the Little Flower? Her “little ways” could be tied into how that person themself can help spread the Love of God in small ways in their life.

I’m already using her for Catholics and Pray because of her being the patron saint of missionaries not because she ever went on one, but because she prayed for them.

The Apostles, who were there when the prayer was created? Or maybe St. Dominic, who so spread the rosary? Or St. Augustine, who wrote specifically about this one prayer?

I like the Apostles, I think I will just use all of them.


#12

I like her, maybe I’ll use her for Easter.


#13

Ya, this is a rather interesting process. I don’t want anything to scary or crazy, not only are they kids, but they’ve had little to no church experience. And LOTS of the Saints had some pretty crazy/gruesome experiences!

I did not realize they had little or no church life. Sorry… I apoligize and wish you good luck with your teaching.


#14

Don’t forget about St. Anthony of Padua.


#15

for the Lord’s Prayer, I suggest St. Louis de Montfort. He wrote alot about that prayer in his book, “The Secret of the Rosary”


#16

Yup, I have him! :thumbsup:

I ended up going with all of the apostles for that.

The two I have left are “Looking at Myself” (guilt, prayer to avoid sin) and Holy Week.

Ideas anyone else?


#17

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