Help for a confused friend


#1

Hey CAF,

If my friend was trying to get married in the Catholic Church, but they weren't sure they wanted to say they'd raise kids Catholic, they're trying to talk to a priest about that, if that happens and the priest doesn't make them promise that, would it be a licit/valid marriage? I'm not sure but I think his or his fiance's family wants them to marry in the Church.

Any pointers on how I can bridge the subject privately to him? He stated that he saw no difference between a Catholic Mass and a lutheran service when they were scouting churches to be wed in. I am going to offer to give a brief but fair comparison of the CC and the lc if he would like to hear it. He think we "believe all the same things" so that's disheartening.

I couldn't think of the words at the time when he said that in person... but feel the need to at least offer an apologia now.

Pax,
Phil


#2

This is best handled between the couple and a priest.

Your post is not really very clear, to be married in the Church one party must be a Catholic. And, if one party is Catholic then of course their obligation is to raise their children Catholic.


#3

Yeah I know, it's not very clear to me.

Disregarding the marriage bit, would you offer to explain the difference between the Catholicism and Lutheranism 1ke?


#4

Yep. it’s a door he opened.


#5

Entire books have been written on that subject. I am afraid I cannot do that in a few sentences.


#6

[quote="ESMDHokie77, post:3, topic:301876"]
Yeah I know, it's not very clear to me.

Disregarding the marriage bit, would you offer to explain the difference between the Catholicism and Lutheranism 1ke?

[/quote]

There was a thread on this recently, which might help you.


#7

The primary difference between a Catholic Mass and Protestant services is not exactly visible, but it is real nonetheless: Catholics have the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. No other service can confer the kinds of graces that a Catholic can receive by attending a Mass and receiving the Eucharist. Nowhere else is Christ’s sacrifice on Calvary re-presented and we are transported to the foot of the cross, where Heaven and Earth meet.

That being said, not all Catholic marriages are celebrated with a Mass. They can be witnessed by a deacon instead, a ceremony may be done in a Catholic parish outside of Mass, or even a non-Catholic ceremony if there are good reasons for doing so. Frequently, if one of the couple is non-Catholic, and half of the assembly will not be eligible to receive Holy Communion, then it is not a good idea to have a Mass, for the Eucharist is a sign of unity among Catholics, among other things. However, it is important to obtain the correct permissions and dispensations well ahead of time in order to enjoy a valid marriage.


#8

[quote="ESMDHokie77, post:3, topic:301876"]
Yeah I know, it's not very clear to me.

Disregarding the marriage bit, would you offer to explain the difference between the Catholicism and Lutheranism

[/quote]

The Catholic Church was founded by Jesus Christ at Pentecost. The Lutheran Church was started by German princes 1500 years later.

Catholicism has all 7 of the Christian sacraments, Lutheranism has only 2 valid sacraments, baptism and matrimony.

The Catholic Church is catholic, universal, apostolic, magisterial. The Lutheran churches are only one of many thousand schismatic sects with widely varying theologies. Superficially, they may appear similar, but they are not.


#9

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