Help me understand something please

Read Hebrews Chapter 6: verses 4 to 8, and then share with me:

Who can this pertain to?

Who should this pertain to?

Who does it pertain to and why?

Or are they just words in a book?

Thank you!

Well in Hebrews 6:4, I thought that maybe where it says enlightened and tasted the heavenly gift may be the Eucharist.
So at first I was thinking these verses just mean anyone in general who believed in Jesus and then converted… But looking closer maybe it can also mean that if you once believe the Eucharist is Jesus, and then fall away…

This is St. Paul speaking to Jews who converted to Christianity and are now having second thoughts. Reading only those isolated versus, it makes it sound as though there is no such thing as reconciliation, but that is not what St. Paul is talking about. He is saying to them that if they now reject Christianity and return again to Judaism while thinking nothing has changed from the old ways, they would be effectively crucifying Jesus (i.e.- rejecting Him) all over again. If they were of a mind to do that knowing full what what His teachings are, the chance of them changing their minds AGAIN and coming back are absolute zero.

This is right after (in Ch. 5) he explains Christ’s priestly ministry (our salvation), citing the words of Psalm 110, saying Christ was, after having been made perfect, “named of God a high priest after the order of Melchizedek.” Melchizedek was King of Salem (Jerusalem) and came out to greet Abram upon his return from rescuing Lot (Gen 14:18) and offered bread and wine in celebration of Abram’s deliverance from his enemies. So St. Paul establishes for them Christ’s role as high priest of His church because some of these Jewish converts began to quibble over how Jesus could be a priest at all since He was of the tribe of David and not of the tribe of Levi or a descendant of Aaron (the tribal source for priests among Jews). By appealing to David’s words in the Psalms, St. Paul is demonstrating that there can be such things as priests outside of the Levitical line, as Melchizedek certainly preceded the birth of Levi by 3 generations.

Then St. Paul gets on them for having idle faith, saying they are still like babes when they should be, by now, like men.

Then comes Ch. 6

So in answer to your questions directly:

Who can this pertain to?
Who should this pertain to?
Who does it pertain to and why?

It directly pertains to the Jewish converts St. Paul is talking to who are sort of going through the basic motions but not really trying to grow their faith. The lesson in it is one for every believer. The lesson about idle faith or turning back to another faith after hearing the Truth pertains to anyone who believes in the Church founded by Jesus Christ.

Or are they just words in a book?

Hardly. They are the word of God (in a book)

This are not just words in a book, they are divinely inspired. No one knows who wrote the book of Hebrews. Some say Paul, some Barnabas, some Apollos. Therefore the author is unknown yet the early Church Fathers considered Hebrews to be inspired.

It was written to the Jewish Christians that were under pressure to go back to Judaism. But they had been baptized, enlightened to the truth. This would be a sin of apostacy to reject what one knows is the truth.

“tasted the heavenly gift” could refer to the Eucharist. I have not found any commentary on that line. I don’t know what else it would refer to.

Nothing is impossible with God so one cannot take the word “impossible” as certain. All sin can be forgiven except blasephmy against the Holy Spirit.

What’s the problem with it ? It’s pretty self-explanatory. BTW - all words in books are words in books :rolleyes:

Dear PJM,

I see this a little different than others. I’ve read and used these verses many times at our Adult Education class at Church. I believe it to be much simpler than others view it as.

Here’s my view. St Paul, if he did in turn write Hebrews, is telling people - If they have tasted the best and still turn away, God can’t do anything else for them. God has given them the very best thing His universe has to offer and it is not good enough for them. How else could God help them. If they don’t choose to come back, it’s their own choice and fault. God will not make them come back, so if they stay gone, they’re gone.

This makes sense to me. It’s similar to some other views.

Take care.

jpaul1953

=jpaul1953;5610351]Dear PJM,

I see this a little different than others. I’ve read and used these verses many times at our Adult Education class at Church. I believe it to be much simpler than others view it as.

Here’s my view. St Paul, if he did in turn write Hebrews, is telling people - If they have tasted the best and still turn away, God can’t do anything else for them. God has given them the very best thing His universe has to offer and it is not good enough for them. How else could God help them. If they don’t choose to come back, it’s their own choice and fault. God will not make them come back, so if they stay gone, they’re gone.

This makes sense to me. It’s similar to some other views.

Take care.

Thanks jp:thumbsup:

I suspect both understanding are correct. Paul and Jewish faith is a “was”

Christ and Catholics [especially Catholics] and protestants are an “Is” meaning application in the present time.:slight_smile:

jpaul1953

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