Help on Religious test question

I am preparing my class for a diocese religion test and going to hand out a study guide and work with them on it. I’d like your input on these questions:

Q. Under what circumstances might a priest counsel against a couple being married?

Q. When does attending a wedding on Saturday evening fulfill your Sunday obligation?

**

Q. What does the word “liturgy” mean?

Thanks

Scott

[quote=Scott Waddell]I am preparing my class for a diocese religion test and going to hand out a study guide and work with them on it. I’d like your input on these questions:

Q. Under what circumstances might a priest counsel against a couple being married?

Q. When does attending a wedding on Saturday evening fulfill your Sunday obligation?

**

Q. What does the word “liturgy” mean?

Thanks

Scott

These are not "simple"questions.

With the first question you could get many different answers and they could all be correct.

The Second question requires knowing the time, place, liturgy used, the readings used.

The third question is much simpler if it’s pertaining to Liturgy in general and not specifically asking about the Liturgy of the Hours, Liturgy of the Word, Liturgy of the Eucharist, etc.
[/quote]

[quote=Scott Waddell]I am preparing my class for a diocese religion test and going to hand out a study guide and work with them on it. I’d like your input on these questions:

Q. Under what circumstances might a priest counsel against a couple being married?

If they have been previously married and divorced and have not sought anulments.]

Q. When does attending a wedding on Saturday evening fulfill your Sunday obligation?

**

I think so…

Q. What does the word “liturgy” mean?
From Fr John Hardon’s “Pocket Catholic Dictionary”:
“A public service, duty, or work…among the eastern Churches it means the Eucharistic sacrifice.”

Thanks

Scott

Have ya thought of dumping the hard ones on Fr. Serpa in AAA?
[/quote]

Scott - Re

Q. When does attending a wedding on Saturday evening fulfill your Sunday obligation?

When it begins after 4pm.

Any mass in a Church faithful to the Pope and celebrated between 4pm Saturday and mid-night Sunday satisfies the obligation.

[quote=Joe Kelley]Scott - Re

Q. When does attending a wedding on Saturday evening fulfill your Sunday obligation?

When it begins after 4pm.

Any mass in a Church faithful to the Pope and celebrated between 4pm Saturday and mid-night Sunday satisfies the obligation.
[/quote]

With the Liturgy and readings proper for that Sunday.

Can. 1247 On Sundays and other holydays of obligation, the faithful are obliged to assist at Mass. They are also to abstain from such work or business that would inhibit the worship to be given to God, the joy proper to the Lord’s Day, or the due relaxation of mind and body.

Can. 1248 §1 The obligation of assisting at Mass is satisfied wherever Mass is celebrated in a catholic rite either on a holyday itself or on the evening of the previous day.

It says a catholic rite. I don’t see anything about which Liturgy or Readings.

I have seen it stated elsewhere, by either a liturgist or canon lawyer, that any Liturgy or Readings suffice, but I can’t find the reference at the moment.

[quote=Joe Kelley]It says a catholic rite. I don’t see anything about which Liturgy or Readings.

I have seen it stated elsewhere, by either a liturgist or canon lawyer, that any Liturgy or Readings suffice, but I can’t find the reference at the moment.
[/quote]

You won’t find this in Canon Law. What you are pointing out is that any Catholic of any Rite can meet the obligation in any Catholic Rite even if it is not their own Rite.

You will find references in the Liturgy documents pertaining to the necessary readings. Just yesterday I was reading about the trend towards celebrating all the Sacraments within the Parish Community (during Sunday Mass) including Marriage instead of privately, such as weddings on Saturday afternoon. One of the discussions stated that it would limit the readings during the “Marriage” Mass because the readings for the specific Sunday could not be substituted with the optional Nuptial readings, otherwise it wouldn’t be the Sunday Mass.

a priest might counsel a couple against getting married if the girl is pregnant, because if that is the only reason they are marrying that could invalidate the wedding because of forced consent. The usual advice is to have the baby, have the man declare paternity and take up his legal responsibilities, and test the relationship to see if they truly want to marry and wait the usual 6 months and go throught the usual preparation.

another reason would be a Catholic who wants to marry a non-Catholic, to give the non-Catholic time to learn more about the faith, what promises the Catholic must make about children etc. and what demands the faith will place on the Catholic partner.

those are 2 examples, there could be many more. If there is a canon law objection it would not be counsel, it would be declaring that no valid marriage can occur.

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]You won’t find this in Canon Law. What you are pointing out is that any Catholic of any Rite can meet the obligation in any Catholic Rite even if it is not their own Rite.

You will find references in the Liturgy documents pertaining to the necessary readings. Just yesterday I was reading about the trend towards celebrating all the Sacraments within the Parish Community (during Sunday Mass) including Marriage instead of privately, such as weddings on Saturday afternoon. One of the discussions stated that it would limit the readings during the “Marriage” Mass because the readings for the specific Sunday could not be substituted with the optional Nuptial readings, otherwise it wouldn’t be the Sunday Mass.

[/quote]

This seems to affect the licity of the mass; a problem for the celebrant. It doesn’t seem to affect the attendee in fulfilling his obligation. E.g. if the celebrant skips the readings entirely I have still fulfilled my obligation to attend.

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