Herbal Supplements Are Often Not What They Seem


#1

NY Times:

Herbal Supplements Are Often Not What They Seem

Americans spend an estimated $5 billion a year on unproven herbal supplements that promise everything from fighting off colds to curbing hot flashes and boosting memory. But now there is a new reason for supplement buyers to beware: DNA tests show that many pills labeled as healing herbs are little more than powdered rice and weeds. Using a test called DNA barcoding, a kind of genetic fingerprinting that has also been used to help uncover labeling fraud in the commercial seafood industry, Canadian researchers tested 44 bottles of popular supplements sold by 12 companies. They found that many were not what they claimed to be, and that pills labeled as popular herbs were often diluted — or replaced entirely — by cheap fillers like soybean, wheat and rice.

Consumer advocates and scientists say the research provides more evidence that the herbal supplement industry is riddled with questionable practices. Industry representatives argue that any problems are not widespread.
For the study, the researchers selected popular medicinal herbs, and then randomly bought different brands of those products from stores and outlets in Canada and the United States. To avoid singling out any company, they did not disclose any product names.
Among their findings were bottles of echinacea supplements, used by millions of Americans to prevent and treat colds, that contained ground up bitter weed, Parthenium hysterophorus, an invasive plant found in India and Australia that has been linked to rashes, nausea and flatulence.

Two bottles labeled as St. John’s wort, which studies have shown may treat mild depression, contained none of the medicinal herb. Instead, the pills in one bottle were made of nothing but rice, and another bottle contained only Alexandrian senna, an Egyptian yellow shrub that is a powerful laxative. Gingko biloba supplements, promoted as memory enhancers, were mixed with fillers and black walnut, a potentially deadly hazard for people with nut allergies.
Of 44 herbal supplements tested, one-third showed outright substitution, meaning there was no trace of the plant advertised on the bottle — only another plant in its place.
Many were adulterated with ingredients not listed on the label, like rice, soybean and wheat, which are used as fillers.

Yikes!
Probably the only way to get the real McCoy is start your own herb garden.


#2

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And minerals should be taken only in small doses.

My first take on the Echinacea warning is – package this brand of the stuff with even more hyped labeling and sell it at novelty stores. Next to the cigarette loads, box o’ spring snakes labeled as peanuts, and plastic fake vomit. :rolleyes:


#3

I once worked for a company that produced plastic PET bottles sold to drink companies such as the big two. As effervescent beverages have a limited shelf life as the gas leaks through the plastic over time, the company did analysis on a large number of still and sparkling mineral waters. Some were legit, but others were either filtered or simple tap water.
We are so open to abuse in the supposed health industry.


#4

Some of the most expensive bottled waters are in reality just water from a municipal water supply ( filtered tap water).:shrug:


#5

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