Heresy #1459 - Real Christians don't 'expiate'!


#1

**Hersey 1459

How does a sinner make satisfaction for sin?

**CCC Paragraph 1459

… Raised up from sin, the sinner must still recover his full spiritual health by doing something more to make amends for the sin: he must “make satisfaction for” or “expiate” his sins. This satisfaction is also called “penance.”

**RSV New Testament:

Romans 3:25** - ****"[Jesus] whom God put forward as an expiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins;"

Hebrews: 2:17 - “Therefore he [Jesus] had to be made like his brethren in every respect, so that he might become a merciful and faithful high priest in the service of God, to make expiation for the sins of the people.”

I John 2:2** - **“and he [Jesus] is the expiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.”

I John 4:10** - **“In this is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son [Jesus] to be the expiation for our sins.”


#2

978 "When we made our first profession of faith while receiving the holy Baptism that cleansed us, the forgiveness we received then was so full and complete that there remained in us absolutely nothing left to efface, neither original sin nor offenses committed by our own will, nor was there left any penalty to suffer in order to expiate them. . . . Yet the grace of Baptism delivers no one from all the weakness of nature. On the contrary, we must still combat the movements of concupiscence that never cease leading us into evil "


#3

The verses you quote do reveal an important fact: Only Christ can expiate (make amends for) the eternal consequence of the sins we commit. However, if a person has sinned and done wrong to God, it is only right that the person should do something right to correct that wrong. Many evangelicals, in addition to Catholics, firmly believe this, at least insofar as it applies with people whom we sin against. In fact, when I went to a baptist church with my friend, the major topic of the long sermon was to make reparations for sin–to return stolen goods, to restore broken property, etc. In short, expatiation has multiple meanings. It means on one level the expiation which only Christ can perform; in the other sense it refers to a more individual expiation. In this sense, we make expiation to show that we are making right what was made wrong by our sin.

You have to be really careful with the language used in the Bible. First, a word may be used multiple times in the Bible, but this does not necessarily mean that the word is used with the same meaning in each case. Oftentimes the word has a different meaning established by the context into which the word is placed. I’m presently reading Akin’s The Salvation Controversy. Honestly, it’s not an “exciting” book; but it is very academic and makes some very good points concerning the language used in the Bible and how language problems often lead to misunderstandings between Catholics and Evangelicals. A good book to better understand how Catholics read the Bible, or should read it. And the book is very clear, too.


#4

Luke 5

34 To whom he said: Can you make the children of the bridegroom fast whilst the bridegroom is with them?

35 But the days will come when the bridegroom shall be taken away from them: then shall they fast in those days.

Also, Christ fasted as a way of example, so I fast as a penance to express sorrow for my sins and longing for God.

Anyway, that’s what the exegesis seems to be for me.


#5

Real Christians DO expiate:

“By loyalty and faithfulness iniquity is atoned for, and by the fear of the LORD a man avoids evil” (Proverbs 16:6).

I think there’s a misunderstanding about the word “expiate”. It just means to make up for something. We can’t make up for the eternal transgression against God: only Christ can do that, and He did it once for all. The Catechism is not saying that we expiate in this way.

However, if you sin against your neighbor by stealing from him, you’re expected to make up for what you’ve done. For example, you give him back what you stole. That’s how Catechism 1459 is using the word “expiate”. In fact, I highly suggest reading 1459-1460 in context. It’s not as insidious as you might think.


#6

[quote=Feeney]**Hersey 1459
**
How does a sinner make satisfaction for sin?

CCC Paragraph 1459

… Raised up from sin, the sinner must still recover his full spiritual health by doing something more to make amends for the sin: he must “make satisfaction for” or “expiate” his sins. This satisfaction is also called “penance.”

**RSV New Testament:

Romans 3:25 - **"[Jesus] whom God put forward as an expiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins;"

Hebrews: 2:17 - “Therefore he [Jesus] had to be made like his brethren in every respect, so that he might become a merciful and faithful high priest in the service of God, to make expiation for the sins of the people.”

I John 2:2** - **“and he [Jesus] is the expiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.”

I John 4:10** - **“In this is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son [Jesus] to be the expiation for our sins.”
[/quote]

Are you suggesting that we should not expiate for our sins in our own imperfect way?


#7

If we don’t expiate sin then what did Jesus mean about coming to terms w/ one’s accuser before reaching the judge who will hand you over …& we will not get out until we have paid the last penny.

and ofcourse there’s the passage about every man’s works being tried by fire …and we being saved…yet as through fire.

Yuo need to check all the context of any teaching before ya call something a heresy.

Now Sola Fide & sola Scriptura might be a different matter, but…


#8

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