Hermit Not in a Cloister


#1

I have developed this great interest in those called to be hermits, but who do not live in a cloister, but at home.

Does anyone know anything about this and how one goes about developing or adopting a rule, profession, daily schedule etc?

Any good sites?

I’m not saying I feel called to be a hermit at all, but I’m just curious about it.

Thanks.


#2

U

Well, it depends on what you’re aiming at. If going for canon 603, and consecration as a diocesan hermit, one has to have lived at least a number of years as a lay eremite while developing one’s plan of life.

Personal Prayer Rules are a start. Develop your Personal Prayer Rule depending on the spirituality one is attracted to (the Holy Ghost works on attraction) .

Try to find a spiritual director. If one is not readily available, the Liturgy of the Hours will suffice as an SD.

Write your spiritual autobiography, and speak with your local bishop. He will be your superior if you do discern a diocesan hermit vocation.

HTH

Blessings,
Cloisters


#3

Lots of links here:

dwellingalone.org/?page_id=6

Lots to sift through, too. Not all of them Catholic or even Christian, but interesting.

Raven's Bread (second link) is good. Stillsong Hermitage is a good site too. She is a Canon 603 hermit, not in a cloister.

notesfromstillsong.blogspot.com


#4

Your questions made me smile, because I refer to myself as spending half of my time as a hermit, and the other half as part of some kind of Christian community.

My "rule of life" is what is required of me as a Lay Carmelite (Liturgy of the Hours Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, and Night Prayer, and 1/2 hour of meditation daily.)

I get up early enough, so that enables me to also include the Office of Readings. Being a widow and empty-nester, I can attend Mass every morning, except Saturday morning as my parish does not have a Mass at that time.

Next to Scripture, "Divine Intimacy" is my favorite spiritual book to meditate with.

Every Monday afternoon I have about six lady friends over for an hour of prayer that consists of the Scriptural Rosary, and other prayers, then a song from CD with quiet time. After that we have coffee and some time to share.

There is another, larger Scriptural Rosary group that meets at a lady friend's home, and she can accommodate up to twenty women.

About once a week I invite about four friends over for a pot luck lunch, and then we watch a movie about a saint and discuss it. I do not care to watch TV at all.

Recently at our Friday morning Reflection Time group that meets after Mass, we just completed watching the ten one-hour presentations by Father Robert Barron called "Catholicism". Everyone loved it!

Every Wednesday after morning Mass there is a group of us who go out to Denny's for breakfast. We have been doing that for many years.....we call it the "breakfast of holy obligation". :) During that time we get to discuss what is going on at the parish, CCD, who needs a call or visit at the hospital, and what we can donate to the homeless (clothes, shoes, snacks, backpacks) that several of the group go to assist every Monday morning at a local St. Vincent de Paul outreach that provides showers, laundry facilities, and sandwiches.

Occasionally I pray a Scriptural Rosary with a friend while walking up and down near an abortion clinic.

Working in my garden gives me physical exercise.

Fortunately, my youngest daughter lives in town, and I get to see her, her husband and my two grandsons often.
My home is always open for my other visiting children and grandchildren, and it is great to have them when they can come.

I bet this is longer than what you expected, and although I may not be an authentic "hermit", I do have a lot of silent, alone time to study and pray, and a nice balance of Christian community.


#5

[quote="Dorothy, post:4, topic:278430"]
Your questions made me smile, because I refer to myself as spending half of my time as a hermit, and the other half as part of some kind of Christian community.

My "rule of life" is what is required of me as a Lay Carmelite (Liturgy of the Hours Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, and Night Prayer, and 1/2 hour of meditation daily.)

I get up early enough, so that enables me to also include the Office of Readings. Being a widow and empty-nester, I can attend Mass every morning, except Saturday morning as my parish does not have a Mass at that time.

Next to Scripture, "Divine Intimacy" is my favorite spiritual book to meditate with.

Every Monday afternoon I have about six lady friends over for an hour of prayer that consists of the Scriptural Rosary, and other prayers, then a song from CD with quiet time. After that we have coffee and some time to share.

There is another, larger Scriptural Rosary group that meets at a lady friend's home, and she can accommodate up to twenty women.

About once a week I invite about four friends over for a pot luck lunch, and then we watch a movie about a saint and discuss it. I do not care to watch TV at all.

Recently at our Friday morning Reflection Time group that meets after Mass, we just completed watching the ten one-hour presentations by Father Robert Barron called "Catholicism". Everyone loved it!

Every Wednesday after morning Mass there is a group of us who go out to Denny's for breakfast. We have been doing that for many years.....we call it the "breakfast of holy obligation". :) During that time we get to discuss what is going on at the parish, CCD, who needs a call or visit at the hospital, and what we can donate to the homeless (clothes, shoes, snacks, backpacks) that several of the group go to assist every Monday morning at a local St. Vincent de Paul outreach that provides showers, laundry facilities, and sandwiches.

Occasionally I pray a Scriptural Rosary with a friend while walking up and down near an abortion clinic.

Working in my garden gives me physical exercise.

Fortunately, my youngest daughter lives in town, and I get to see her, her husband and my two grandsons often.
My home is always open for my other visiting children and grandchildren, and it is great to have them when they can come.

I bet this is longer than what you expected, and although I may not be an authentic "hermit", I do have a lot of silent, alone time to study and pray, and a nice balance of Christian community.

[/quote]

What a wonderful life you have chosen and the Lord has blessed you with in your widowhood!! I am sure you are a wonderful example to others who are widows and adjusting to being alone. If I am ever a widow (I almost was last year when my husband had a stroke), I am going to think of all the things you do as an example. Thank you for sharing your life.


#6

Yes, that’s exactly what I’m referring to!

And it’s not for me. I am a social person. :slight_smile:

I was just wondering how it works.

Do you know how common this is?

Blessings,
Cloisters


#7

[quote="TrueLight, post:6, topic:278430"]
Yes, that's exactly what I'm referring to!

And it's not for me. I am a social person. :)

I was just wondering how it works.

Do you know how common this is?

[/quote]

This is becoming MORE common these days as more Bishops are accepting Diocesan Hermits again, but as a rule isn't available in many Dioceses yet. The practice is attempting to make a come back though!

Friar Don, OBR


#8

[quote="CB_Catholic, post:5, topic:278430"]
What a wonderful life you have chosen and the Lord has blessed you with in your widowhood!! I am sure you are a wonderful example to others who are widows and adjusting to being alone. If I am ever a widow (I almost was last year when my husband had a stroke), I am going to think of all the things you do as an example. Thank you for sharing your life.

[/quote]

Thank you for the affirmation CB Catholic. :)


#9

[quote="Dorothy, post:4, topic:278430"]
Your questions made me smile, because I refer to myself as spending half of my time as a hermit, and the other half as part of some kind of Christian community.

My "rule of life" is what is required of me as a Lay Carmelite (Liturgy of the Hours Morning Prayer, Evening Prayer, and Night Prayer, and 1/2 hour of meditation daily.)

I get up early enough, so that enables me to also include the Office of Readings. Being a widow and empty-nester, I can attend Mass every morning, except Saturday morning as my parish does not have a Mass at that time.

Next to Scripture, "Divine Intimacy" is my favorite spiritual book to meditate with.

Every Monday afternoon I have about six lady friends over for an hour of prayer that consists of the Scriptural Rosary, and other prayers, then a song from CD with quiet time. After that we have coffee and some time to share.

There is another, larger Scriptural Rosary group that meets at a lady friend's home, and she can accommodate up to twenty women.

About once a week I invite about four friends over for a pot luck lunch, and then we watch a movie about a saint and discuss it. I do not care to watch TV at all.

Recently at our Friday morning Reflection Time group that meets after Mass, we just completed watching the ten one-hour presentations by Father Robert Barron called "Catholicism". Everyone loved it!

Every Wednesday after morning Mass there is a group of us who go out to Denny's for breakfast. We have been doing that for many years.....we call it the "breakfast of holy obligation". :) During that time we get to discuss what is going on at the parish, CCD, who needs a call or visit at the hospital, and what we can donate to the homeless (clothes, shoes, snacks, backpacks) that several of the group go to assist every Monday morning at a local St. Vincent de Paul outreach that provides showers, laundry facilities, and sandwiches.

Occasionally I pray a Scriptural Rosary with a friend while walking up and down near an abortion clinic.

Working in my garden gives me physical exercise.

Fortunately, my youngest daughter lives in town, and I get to see her, her husband and my two grandsons often.
My home is always open for my other visiting children and grandchildren, and it is great to have them when they can come.

I bet this is longer than what you expected, and although I may not be an authentic "hermit", I do have a lot of silent, alone time to study and pray, and a nice balance of Christian community.

[/quote]

Dorothy, I envy the life you have. In a good way, It's a great thing to fill your time with things of the Lord and in encouraging the brethren.

I just purchased Divine Intimacy by the way. :)


#10

[quote="christofirst, post:3, topic:278430"]
Lots of links here:

dwellingalone.org/?page_id=6

Lots to sift through, too. Not all of them Catholic or even Christian, but interesting.

Raven's Bread (second link) is good. Stillsong Hermitage is a good site too. She is a Canon 603 hermit, not in a cloister.

notesfromstillsong.blogspot.com

[/quote]

Thank you!!!

I was looking for links like this.


#11

[quote="FriarDon, post:7, topic:278430"]
This is becoming MORE common these days as more Bishops are accepting Diocesan Hermits again, but as a rule isn't available in many Dioceses yet. The practice is attempting to make a come back though!

Friar Don, OBR

[/quote]

Friar Don, you say they are accepting them again. Was there a time this was common and at some point was stopped for some reason?


#12

[quote="TrueLight, post:10, topic:278430"]
Thank you!!!

I was looking for links like this.

[/quote]

Sister Laurel at Stillsong Hermitage is a wonderful spiritual person. I "knew" her from another forum I posted on years ago.


#13

[quote="TrueLight, post:9, topic:278430"]
Dorothy, I envy the life you have. In a good way, It's a great thing to fill your time with things of the Lord and in encouraging the brethren.

I just purchased Divine Intimacy by the way. :)

[/quote]

"Divine Intimacy" is an excellent book! It has been a few weeks that I have been using it daily for meditation, in place of other books I had been using.


#14

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