High School Latin

Is the Latin you take in high school differant then the latin you would need to know as a priest? I was thinking about taking it but heard they were differant. Should i take it? Would it help me at all in learning the priest kind?

My son takes Latin in a Catholic High School…it is the same latin that the priests know and use…

According to my son, the pronunciation was made up based on Greek pronunciation, instead of on the Romance languages. It sounds horrible to anyone used to the pronunciation used liturgically, even if it’s friendlier to English-speaking sensibilities…

:blessyou:

Most highschool Latin today is taught as Classical Latin which is pronounced differently (soft V’s, hard C’s, et cetera, plus lots of Ancient Roman cultural stuff) and is strung together somewhat differently than Ecclesiastical Latin, but it is not hard to switch from the former to the latter.

I’ve never tried to make the switch the other way, but I imagine it is a bit more difficult :twocents:

tee

Is the Latin you take in high school differant then the latin you would need to know as a priest?

Not substantially, but in a lot of little ways. One way is the pronunciation. But learning 2 types of pronunciation is not hard.

I was thinking about taking it but heard they were differant. Should i take it? Would it help me at all in learning the priest kind?

Yes. You should take it. It will be incredibly helpful in learning ecclesiastical latin. You’ll need to learn some new technical vocab used in church writings, but they are essentially the same language. You should not have to “re-learn” anything.

I’ve never tried to make the switch the other way, but I imagine it is a bit more difficult

Yes, probably, because Ecclesiastical Latin is a whole lot easier than Classical Latin.

Same language, except Ecclesiastical is written as “vulgate” Latin (ie, the latin the common people spoke…sort of weird to think in this day and age) and so it is very simple. The constructions are straightforward usually, word order is logical, sentences don’t get too complex with additional clauses.

Classical Latin can be a killer with some of the complicated constructions used by the upper-class literary types to show off. Coming to an old missal or breviary after reading Cicero or Vergil…is really easy.

I’m currently studying Classical Latin at university, and hope to enter the seminary afterwards.

It’s essentially the same, the pronunciation switch is pretty easy - just like speaking in two different accents of english.

Another difference is the vocabulary used in prayers etc, which is pretty easy to pick up. (in prayers there’s a bit less ‘savage bloodshed’ and a bit more ‘deign to grant, we beseech’!)

Discussion re Latin also ocurring here:

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=121562

Semper Ubi Sub Ubi!

Brutus et erat forti,
Caesar et sum iam,
Brutus sic in omnibus,
Caesar sic intram.:smiley:

I guess it depends on where you go.

I took 2 years of Latin at an archdiocesan high school seminary, so we were exposed to both.

Did you have Fr. Sheridan for Latin and ever give a wrong answer??? (now I’m bringing back Quigley memories)

Slaps Norseman HARD on the back. “Make sure Chicago gets things right from now on!”

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