Hinduism and String theory


#1

I just saw on old movie on YouTube called “NIght Monster” from way back in 1942. In the movie, there was a Hindu that stated that according to his religion, the universe is made up of vibrations, and that reality can be controlled if one can learn to control these vibrations,

I was thinking how similar the concept is to String Theory.

Does anyone know if this is really part of the Hindu religion, or was this just another Hollywood invention?

If it is just another Hollywood invention, it’s fascinating how the String Theory could be so elucidated in fiction several decades even before it was conceived among scientists.:smiley:

I know that alot of what is science now may have been considered “magic” back then, but this is sort of revelatory in a most entertaining sense to me.

Blessings,
Marduk


#2

For Hindus Multiverses never came to be at some particular point, but always has been, always will be, but is perpetually in flux. Space and time are of cyclical nature. This universe is simply the current one, which is in flux and constantly changing, when it finally ceases to manifest, a new one will arise.

Some Hindus believe that the first thing that ever was and will be is 'Shabda' or sound. This energy is produced by vibrations in energy produced by the powers of the Trinity (Lord Brahma, Lord Vishnu and Lord Shiva). Although at a very high level, this resembles the multidimensional vibrations of the 'Gunas' or strings, which are said to be the basis of all creation. WIKIPEDIA


#3

Sounds like Hollywood's trying to recreate the force!!

:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

Escape!


#4

Wait a sec! if I remember correctly Shiva is the god of destruction while Vishnu is the god of preservation while Brahma is the god of creation.
So not quite a trinity there :cool:


#5

Just ask them , in which part of your scriptures it says like that… Probably no. Because they are experts to tie up their scriptures to new ideologies by giving them new explanation to its verses…


#6

Hmm… What religions does that sound like?


#7

[quote="Samson33, post:6, topic:304706"]
Hmm... What religions does that sound like?

[/quote]

Term Hindu is no where used in their scriptures. Actually it is the British people given the name , in 19 nth century. To denote those who are living in the territories of India other than Buddhist,Sikh, Parsi, Jain, Muslim and Christian.

"According to the New Encyclopedia Britannica 20:581, 'Hinduism' was a name given in English language in the Nineteenth Century by the English people to the multiplicity of the beliefs and faiths of the people of the Indus land. The British writers in 1830 gave the word 'Hinduism' to be used as the common name for all the beliefs of the people of India excluding the Muslims and converted Christians."

Faith and religious books are actually of Brahmanism a very ancient faith. It is successful mingling of Brahmanism with the other regional faiths in India.

Their main theologies (Eg: Advaita Vedanta, 8th Century AD ) was developed for giving philosophical out look to Hinduism by coining the teachings of their scriptures for opposing Buddhism and Jainism. When philosophical religions (Godless) such as Buddhism and Jainism started gaining converts, even from brahmins, Adi Sankara in 8th AD century developed this theology. He was very successful in his mission.

swamij.com/hindu-word.htm


#8

Founding of Theosophical society also accelerated the unification of these regional faiths in India with Brahmanism under the term Hinduism.

acns.com/~mm9n/articles/emergence/11.htm


#9

http://www.acns.com/~mm9n/articles/emergence/11.htm1.jpg


#10

http://www.acns.com/~mm9n/articles/emergence/11.htm2.jpg


#11

Once seperated from the Historic Christianity, the gnostic Christians underwent syncretic amalgamation with other religions. In that process, both Buddhism and Jainism practically vanished from India except in certain pockets. Since gnosticism by its nature does not have a specific theological system, a single system of morality, or a central religious organization Hinduism is not a single religion. . It consists of "thousands of different religious groups that have evolved in India since 1500 BCE."

The Hindus are divided into three main classes, viz., Vaishnavas who worship Vishnu; Saivas who worship Siva; and Saktas who worship Devi or the Mother . In addition, there are the Sauras, who worship the Sun-God; Ganapatyas who worship Ganesa; and Kaumaras who worship Skanda. In addition there are other groups that worship other gods and spirits – some good and some evil. These groups were never united and were constantly fighting with each other.

The word Hinduism came into existence as the name of a religion only with the coming of the British. The British classified the religions into three classes: Christians, Muslims and all the others. “All the others“ were called Hindus – which simply meant “of India”. When the people of India began to struggle for independence these religious denominations found a common enemy and that is what united them and the name Hinduism became meaningful symbol of national unity and the name got stuck. In that sense, Hinduism was the product of the British ignorance. Anything that is not Christian or Muslim came to mean Hindu. Dropping out the idols, the witchcraft and other practices what is exported as Hinduism is essentially the Gnostic Christianity.


#12

I honestly don’t know and I come from a Hindu family. Everybody seems to believe in something different, yet they all identify as Hindus. It seemed very contradictory to me. Mutually exclusive propositions are accepted as true.


#13

[quote="InJesusItrust, post:12, topic:304706"]
I honestly don't know and I come from a Hindu family. Everybody seems to believe in something different, yet they all identify as Hindus. It seemed very contradictory to me. Mutually exclusive propositions are accepted as true.

[/quote]

                Can you show me any reference books which mentions term Hinduism as a religion before 19nth century. ?. It is an unified form of all regional faith in the indian subcontinent with the Brahmin religion. It is happened in 19nth century.

         As far as from my knowledge and belief, the term is derived from the word Sindhu , which relates to Indus valley civilization. Arabs and Persians used to call these geographical area as Hind and its residents were called as Hindus or Hindis. It is a home land to variety of philosophical thoughts and birth place of non theistic religions such as Buddhism and Jainism. Sikhism a monotheistic region also originated in this great country. 

                It is the British People, who used to denote all the people of India except Chrisitans and muslims as Hindus.

"According to the New Encyclopedia Britannica 20:581, 'Hinduism' was a name given in English language in the Nineteenth Century by the English people to the multiplicity of the beliefs and faiths of the people of the Indus land. The British writers in 1830 gave the word 'Hinduism' to be used as the common name for all the beliefs of the people of India excluding the Muslims and converted Christians."


#14

Just because Hinduism isn't an organized religion doesn't mean it isn't the oldest. Yes there is no single organization or list of dogmas that tie them together, but that does not mean just because there is no word to describe something it does not exist. Many Christians are under the false assumption that the Hindus are polytheist and therefore are primitives who worship anything they can think of. The Hindu religion could be considered a form of Polymorphic Monotheism. The worship on supreme god under many different names. The only argument is what the name of the supreme God actually is Vishnu, Shiva, Krishna. And even If you don't want to admit the possibility that they are monotheists they are at least henotheist and believe that the other gods are an extension of the one they worship. Hinduism is in fact older than Judaism, unless you believe in Adam and Eve.


#15

The correct name for what is commonly called “Hinduism” is “Sanatana Dharma” (eternal righteousness). I recently read a book by Paramahansa Yogananda where he talked about God manifesting Himself as vibrations to bring things into existence, or keep them in existence.

You can probably learn more accurate information about it by Googling “Sanatana Dharma” than by looking up “Hinduism.”

Xuan


#16

[quote="mardukm, post:1, topic:304706"]
I just saw on old movie on YouTube called "NIght Monster" from way back in 1942. In the movie, there was a Hindu that stated that according to his religion, the universe is made up of vibrations, and that reality can be controlled if one can learn to control these vibrations,

I was thinking how similar the concept is to String Theory.

Does anyone know if this is really part of the Hindu religion, or was this just another Hollywood invention?

[/quote]

Actually, at least from what you've stated, the movie is spot on.

Vibrations and intonations play a very significant role in ancient Brahmanism. I believe its due to the high regard they have for the rituals and verses within the Vedas.

Somewhere in the hoary ancient past, the Brahmins (the priestly caste) came to regard the rituals within their texts to be of higher importance than the deities that the rituals were addressed to.....save 1 exception of course. The rituals were seen as a means by which reality was manipulated and the cosmos renewed - not unlike the religious rituals carried out in other cultures.

But what was of great significance was the emphasis they placed on carrying out the procedure - especially with the chanting/prayers/songs etc.

For instance, you know the sound "Om?" "Om" doesn't "stand" for anything - its not a designator or a referrant in the same manner that the word "cat" refers to actual felines we know and love.

Om is supposed to encompass all of reality.

Just because Hinduism isn't an organized religion doesn't mean it isn't the oldest. Yes there is no single organization or list of dogmas that tie them together, but that does not mean just because there is no word to describe something it does not exist. Many Christians are under the false assumption that the Hindus are polytheist and therefore are primitives who worship anything they can think of. The Hindu religion could be considered a form of Polymorphic Monotheism. The worship on supreme god under many different names. The only argument is what the name of the supreme God actually is Vishnu, Shiva, Krishna. And even If you don't want to admit the possibility that they are monotheists they are at least henotheist and believe that the other gods are an extension of the one they worship. Hinduism is in fact older than Judaism, unless you believe in Adam and Eve.

Part of the problem is our attempts to classify each others social actions.

Best way to indicate this would be a story I heard from one of my own Hindu friends from Tamil Nadu.

One of his friends, an evangelical christian (unsure as to the sect), found it bizzare and odd that he could find Sikhs, Hindus, and many other sectarians showing up at each others places of worship and feverently praying to God(s).

"This would be an offense in my own religion. It would be an insult and betrayal of God." he said. He then went about inquiring via my friend as to why these various sectarians were worshipping at another group's place when they visited.

The translated response he got back from one of the revelers was, "To not pay respects to God, regardless of his manifestation, would be an insult to him."

Do you see the point? ;)

The two civilizations concepts of what constitutes religion or God diverge wildly.

Because Western civilization got the upper hand on India, China, et al. their defintiions and categories were predominate for a time.

When analyzing something as complicated as the religious life of India, all they could do was make reference to their own experiences and label accordingly.

Hinduism sorta looks like Graeco-Roman/Semitic Polytheism to them....even though a close examination of it reveals otherwise.


#17

[quote="Xuan, post:15, topic:304706"]
The correct name for what is commonly called "Hinduism" is "Sanatana Dharma" (eternal righteousness). I recently read a book by Paramahansa Yogananda where he talked about God manifesting Himself as vibrations to bring things into existence, or keep them in existence.

You can probably learn more accurate information about it by Googling "Sanatana Dharma" than by looking up "Hinduism."

Xuan

[/quote]

That term "Sanathana Dharma" was also a 19nth century invention. This term was first used by Swami Vivekananda in 19nth century.


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