Hindus worshiping Jesus Christ

Hindus are worshiping Jesus Christ without knowing that. Hindu`s Holy Book Veda says some thing about Christ, and it was written in Sanskrit. The langauge not known by most of the Hindus. Please read it.
Om Sri Brahma Puthraya Nama reads as ‘I worship Jesus, who came to the world as God’s son (John 3:16.17)’. Om Shri Dakshina Murthaya Nama reads ‘I worship Jesus who is sitting on the right of his father (John (1:18)’. 'Om Sri Panchakaya Nama refers to Jesus, the one with five wounds (John 20:25.27). Om Sri Ummathiya Nama is translated as ‘I hail one born to the holy spirit’ (Mathew 1:18).
In Christ,
selvaraj

I didn´t know that, it´s awesome.

[quote=selvaraj]Hindus are worshiping Jesus Christ without knowing that. Hindu`s Holy Book Veda says some thing about Christ, and it was written in Sanskrit. The langauge not known by most of the Hindus. Please read it.
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So how old is this “Veda” exactly? I thought Hinduism was probably the oldest religion on earth right now.

[quote=exoflare]So how old is this “Veda” exactly? I thought Hinduism was probably the oldest religion on earth right now.
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Vedas were written 3500 years back.
In Christ,
selvaraj

Grace & Peace!

Selvaraj, I’m not quite sure one can make these one-to-one connections to the Vedic mantras you quote. I’m no expert by any stretch of the imagination, but it looks like the first mantra is a reference to Brahma, the Creator in the Trimurti (Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva), Dakshina Murthaya is a name for Shiva as the Great Teacher, Panchaka(n)ya seems to refer to five women from the great Indian epics…it looks like one must do a lot of theological twisting and turning to make the Vedic mantra fit the “Christian” interpretation.

In fact, doing such a thing is actually dishonorable–it disrespects Hinduism and debases the Christian message my resorting to untruths. There are a lot of similarities to be found between Hinduism and Christianity–Dom Bede Griffiths did a lot of work in this regard. But they are not the same religion. Hinduism is very beautiful, but it is not Christianity, nor does it harbor a secret Christian influence (except, perhaps, in certain interpretations of the final avatar of Vishnu to come, Kalki–but we must remember that an avatar is not an incarnation).

With regard to these mantras being so misinterpreted, look at christianaggression.org/features_hijack.php for more information. Hindu communities are incensed. And you cannot blame them. I would not want a Brahmin coming into church and saying that the Lord’s prayer actually refers to Indra, king of the gods.

There is a lot of wisdom in Hinduism, and there is much, in this way, that points to Christ. For instance, one can see the Risen Lord in the beautiful image of Shiva Nataraj, dancing the dance of life on the imp of ignorance, holding the beginnings and the ends of the worlds in his hands (the drum of creation, the fire of destruction), surrounded by a ring of divine power–but it remains an image of Shiva Nataraj. This deliberate mistranslation of these mantras is very wrongheaded.

–Mark

Deo Gratias!

Where did you find these translations?

I have been told that Jesus to them is simply one out of the many “gods” and other important figures that Hindus believe in. Jesus is in no way front and center to Hindus.

[quote=Catholic Dude]I have been told that Jesus to them is simply one out of the many “gods” and other important figures that Hindus believe in. Jesus is in no way front and center to Hindus.
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True.
Hindus embrace everything that they find sacred and good. they have great devotion to our lady as well

[quote=Andrew_11]Where did you find these translations?
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Max Muller translated this. For more please visit:dharmaavenue.com/faces-lives/max-muller.htm
In Christ,
selvaraj

What litle I’ve heard about Hindus is that they believe there have been many manifestations of God, and Jesus may be just another one.

I have a couple of co-workers who are hindu, maybe I’ll ask them what they think about Jesus. My guess is that they have no opinion one way or the other.

Have to be careful though, discussing religion can be viewed as an imposition on their religious freedoms.

[quote=radhika]True.
Hindus embrace everything that they find sacred and good. they have great devotion to our lady as well
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The Blessed Trinity is to be worshipped exclusively - there is no room for false gods, but only for the One Unique God: not for any others. To worship Jesus Christ alongside others is not to worship Him at all.

Devotion to Mary is not devotion to Mary outside an orthodox POV which never forgets that she is not a goddess but a human being. Apart from that, it is, objectively, an example of false worship - subjectively good as it may be (if God were gracious to us only if we were faultless in doctrine, we would be comprehensively ignored.)

So all this about Hindus honouring her at Fatima is in no sense what the Church does: the theological foundations of this practice in Catholicism are utterly different from, and contradict, whatever the Hindu principles for so doing are. ##

Talks like this make me wonder how do you teach someone who believes in many gods that there is one God? It just sounds so hard to get across and not to mention the Trinity which should keep them spinning.

[quote=Catholic Dude]Talks like this make me wonder how do you teach someone who believes in many gods that there is one God?
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Hindus believe in one God, who appears nevertheless in many different forms. In a sense, one could say that whereas Christianity has a Trinity of Three, Hinduism has an Infinity of Infinity: God not in three persons, but in infinite persons. Hindus don’t find the Trinity hard to understand; for them, it makes a lot of sense, but it doesn’t go far enough.

I guess the beauty of polytheism is that there is always room for one more

[quote=Steve Andersen]I guess the beauty of polytheism is that there is always room for one more
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Just because someone believes that God is in all things and persons doesn’t make her into a polytheist. Didn’t St. Thomas Aquinas argue that God is in all things?

[quote=Ahimsa]Hindus believe in one God, who appears nevertheless in many different forms. In a sense, one could say that whereas Christianity has a Trinity of Three, Hinduism has an Infinity of Infinity: God not in three persons, but in infinite persons. Hindus don’t find the Trinity hard to understand; for them, it makes a lot of sense, but it doesn’t go far enough.
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I didnt know that. Every time I hear about them I hear of all these many many gods who do different things, with some being more important than others. At the same time are you sure that they are strict monotheists? Something doesnt sound right with the term “infinity persons” and in the end just one god.

[quote=Catholic Dude]I didnt know that. Every time I hear about them I hear of all these many many gods who do different things, with some being more important than others. At the same time are you sure that they are strict monotheists? Something doesnt sound right with the term “infinity persons” and in the end just one god.
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It depends on what you mean by “strict monotheist”. In any case, in the earliest Hindu scripture, the Rig Veda, it’s written:

They call Him Indra, Mitra, Varuna, Agni,
and even the swift winged celestial bird Garutaman.
The learned speak of the One Reality in many ways.
They call Him Agni, Yama and Matarisvan. (Rig Veda I. 164.46)

(Indra, Mitra, Varuna, Agni, Yama, etc., being different deities, or different names, of that One Reality.)

It seems that just like Muslims find it hard to understand how Christians can be Trinitarian and Monotheistic at the same time, non-Hindus often find it hard (or impossible!!:)) to understand how Hindus can acknowledge one God/Truth Who appears in many different manifestations or deities.

Another text from the Upanishads, which are part of the Vedas:
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[font=Book Antiqua] Then Vidaghdha, son of Shakala, asked him, “How many gods are there, Yajnavalkya?” Yajnavalkya, ascertaining the number through a group of mantras known as the Nivid, replied, “As many as are mentioned in the Nivid of the gods: three hundred and three, and three thousand and three.”
“Very good,” said the son of Shakala, “and how many gods are there, Yajnavalkya?”
“Thirty-three.”
“Very good, and how many gods are there, Yajnavalkya?”
“Six.”
“Very good, and how many gods are there, Yajnavalkya?”
“Three.”
“Very good, and how many gods are there, Yajnavalkya?”
“Two.”
“Very good, and how many gods are there, Yajnavalkya?”
“One and a half.”
“Very good, and how many gods are there, Yajnavalkya?”
“One.”
(Brihadaranyaka Upanishad 3.9.1)

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Beliefnet article: I was a Hindu-Christian baby.

The Bible says that all humanity was created in the image and likeness of God, therefore all people reflect this image to a greater or lesser degree. The Catechism states that all have the capacity to know God. However, this knowledge of God comes from natural reason and does not reflect divine revelation. It is more of a preparation for revelation.

I have read the Bagavad Gita, and I find the philosophy behind it very reasonable. Many philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle discovered the oneness of God within a polytheistic context. However, this knowledge does not make them Christian. It is the Christian revelation which makes Christianity what it is.

So the way I see the question is this: are Hindu revelations interchangeable with Christian revelations? Are they compatible? Can you reduce one to the other?

I myself don’t think so. The Catholic church certainly doesn’t teach this.

As for the Hindu quotes that were sited claiming to prophesy the coming of Jesus…in theory this seems great. Virgil, a pagan writer who lived 70 years before Jesus, was considered by many early Christians as prophesying the coming of Christ. However, I’ve researched the quotes mentioned and found a lot of Hindu sites very angry about the whole thing. Are you sure about your sources?

God Bless.

The Hindu quotes that started this thread do not mention “Jesus Christ”. Instead, certain Sanskrit words and names were taken out of context to make it appear as if the quotes refer to Jesus Christ. For instance, the word “Dakshina” means “the right side” (as opposed to “the left side”); it has nothing to do with Jesus sitting on the “right side” of the Father.

Having said that, I think what the quotes indicate is that similar ideas appear in different religions. The importance and auspiciousness of the “right side”, for instance, pops up across many different cultures and religions.

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