Historical connections between Vespers and Faspa


#1

I am researching the origin of Faspa, a snack served in the afternoon between lunch and dinner in Mennonite homes. It is a time to relax and visit. Typically pickles, cheese, homemade bread and coffee is served. Although it once was served daily, it usually is now only served on Sundays when guests come to visit. I believe Faspa may date back to the 1500s, but I can’t be sure. I suspect it may have a link to Vespers, the evening prayer, but also am not sure. Does anyone have any information I might be able to use?


#2

The word "vesper" means "evening" (or also "evening star"). Perhaps there is an etymological connection between the names without necessarily a historical connection between the two practices?


#3

[quote="E_Chornoboy, post:1, topic:330674"]
I am researching the origin of Faspa, a snack served in the afternoon between lunch and dinner in Mennonite homes. It is a time to relax and visit. Typically pickles, cheese, homemade bread and coffee is served. Although it once was served daily, it usually is now only served on Sundays when guests come to visit. I believe Faspa may date back to the 1500s, but I can't be sure. I suspect it may have a link to Vespers, the evening prayer, but also am not sure. Does anyone have any information I might be able to use?

[/quote]

Here is someone's blog about Faspa:

judys-front-porch.blogspot.com/2008/12/faspare-visited.html

It seems that the word is a low German word meaning "light meal", and doesn't have anything to do with vespers. It has more to do with keeping Sunday a day of rest by preparing the meal on Saturday, according to the blog. Interesting.


#4

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