History buffs most likely to become Catholic?


#1

I like to study how the Bible was cannonized, what books were included, and how the early Catholic Church debated the cannon till 397.
I tell this to my friends and they tell me: “Just accept it as God’s Word, and don’t question anything about it.”

I do accept the Bible as the inerrant word of God, but I still like to dig into the history of it.

Some of my evangelical friends find it almost heresy to even study how the Bible came about!
I get blank stares when I start talking about Cannon disputes and pre Bible Christianity. Almost like, "you better not go any further, Jason, you just might lose your salvation!
:eek:

Which leads me to my point. The history of the Bible would lead someone to become Roman Catholic, because early Church fathers gave us the final lists, and by separating from that Church we are disobeying them, and most importantly, Christ.

As a Protestant I’m looking into joining the RCC, but cradle Catholics must realize it’s not as easy as you think. Many of us have been immersed in Protestant/fundamentalist beliefs our whole lives, and feel uncertain about some Catholic theology. Also, we have family members who would really lose it if we joined the RCC.
I know, excuses are like earholes, everybody has em! :wink:

Praise to King Jesus Christ :thumbsup:


#2

yeah, everyone has earholes…

but, when you convert, people feel like you are saying
their earholes are not quite… good enough…

lol

:slight_smile:


#3

[quote=se~orcampana]I like to study how the Bible was cannonized, what books were included, and how the early Catholic Church debated the cannon till 397.
I tell this to my friends and they tell me: “Just accept it as God’s Word, and don’t question anything about it.”

I do accept the Bible as the inerrant word of God, but I still like to dig into the history of it.

Some of my evangelical friends find it almost heresy to even study how the Bible came about!
I get blank stares when I start talking about Cannon disputes and pre Bible Christianity. Almost like, "you better not go any further, Jason, you just might lose your salvation!
:eek:

Which leads me to my point. The history of the Bible would lead someone to become Roman Catholic, because early Church fathers gave us the final lists, and by separating from that Church we are disobeying them, and most importantly, Christ.

As a Protestant I’m looking into joining the RCC, but cradle Catholics must realize it’s not as easy as you think. Many of us have been immersed in Protestant/fundamentalist beliefs our whole lives, and feel uncertain about some Catholic theology. Also, we have family members who would really lose it if we joined the RCC.
I know, excuses are like earholes, everybody has em! :wink:

Praise to King Jesus Christ :thumbsup:
[/quote]

Also add to it that without the early saints there is no way to know what scripture is. If there was no record of the councils in the early church and the writings of the saints, who is to say that the writings of Paul are nothing more than fiction? Simply because they are in the bible is not a good reason to call them scripture.

I am sure it is very difficult. I don’t know if I could do it, therefore I am glad I am already there.


#4

and yeah, i agree with your thread title… if you study
history, you are going to become very… catholic…

then if you open your heart and mind, you are very
likely to become Catholic…

happened to me… lol

:slight_smile:


#5

The day I realized that the Church gave the Bible to the world and not vice versa was the day I could no longer be a Protestant.

But, I agree. It isn’t easy to set aside what you were taught for years and years–what you grew up believing. Of course, no one who becomes Catholic totally rejects all they were taught as Protestants because most Protestant churches teach many of the same things as the Catholic Church. Because they came out of the Catholic Church they accept without question some things that weren’t all that clear to the early Church, such as the nature of Christ, the Trinity, and other such thorny issues.


#6

Just like Cardinal Newman said, to be deep in history is to cease to be protestant. :thumbsup:


#7

[quote=Della]The day I realized that the Church gave the Bible to the world and not vice versa was the day I could no longer be a Protestant.

[/quote]

Me, too. But that isn’t the same as saying I was ready to be Catholic! A lot of us converts go through a no-man’s-land phase where we are Catholic in our head but can’t quite move it to the heart. It is a horrible place to be.


#8

[quote=se~orcampana]I like to study how the Bible was cannonized, what books were included, and how the early Catholic Church debated the cannon till 397.
I tell this to my friends and they tell me: “Just accept it as God’s Word, and don’t question anything about it.”

I do accept the Bible as the inerrant word of God, but I still like to dig into the history of it.

Some of my evangelical friends find it almost heresy to even study how the Bible came about!
I get blank stares when I start talking about Cannon disputes and pre Bible Christianity. Almost like, "you better not go any further, Jason, you just might lose your salvation!
:eek:

Which leads me to my point. The history of the Bible would lead someone to become Roman Catholic, because early Church fathers gave us the final lists, and by separating from that Church we are disobeying them, and most importantly, Christ.

As a Protestant I’m looking into joining the RCC, but cradle Catholics must realize it’s not as easy as you think. Many of us have been immersed in Protestant/fundamentalist beliefs our whole lives, and feel uncertain about some Catholic theology. Also, we have family members who would really lose it if we joined the RCC.
I know, excuses are like earholes, everybody has em! :wink:

Praise to King Jesus Christ :thumbsup:
[/quote]

I guess you couldn’t consider me a “cradle Catholic” but since I was little I always went to the Catholic church across the street. I always wanted to make the sign of the cross, I always wanted to read the bible and was constantly scared that I should go to confession. But my mother (who was Catholic) did not baptize me at all and never took me to church on her own so I never got what I wanted. So I went after it on my own! It was the best day of my life! The water was kinda cold, but it was worth it! I have never regretted it.


#9

[quote=jimmy]I am sure it is very difficult. I don’t know if I could do it, therefore I am glad I am already there.
[/quote]

When I realized the Church is the one true church, no matter what family or friends said (although I lost a few good friends) - I converted – then, without even trying, brought into the church most of my immediate family! Some are still in the process (RCIA).

God’s grace is really something. It’s like a chain-reaction thing without even trying.


#10

[quote=CindyGia]When I realized the Church is the one true church, no matter what family or friends said (although I lost a few good friends) - I converted – then, without even trying, brought into the church most of my immediate family! Some are still in the process (RCIA).

God’s grace is really something. It’s like a chain-reaction thing without even trying.
[/quote]

We have to be willing to say yes to that grace though. I don’t know if I could do it. It would be a tough situation. I would know what I would have to do but I might not be willing to give in. I respect any protestant who has converted due to this. I am glad I am not in that situation.


#11

[quote=jimmy]We have to be willing to say yes to that grace though.
[/quote]

Once you come to realize what the Eucharist is - HOW IN THE WORLD can you pass up receiving Jesus in the Eucharist?

I cannot understand Protestants who when they come to realize that the Eucharist is the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ, that they still will pass it up because their friends and family disapprove. How and why in the world would any Christian not want to receive Jesus in the Eucharist?

It’s unfathomable to me. I just don’t get it.


#12

God could have sit a hundred chimpanzees at a table to decide the canon and we would still have the Bible today.


#13

[quote=allischalmers]God could have sit a hundred chimpanzees at a table to decide the canon and we would still have the Bible today.
[/quote]

I wonder if people would feel the same about it if that happened? Hmmm…


#14

[quote=allischalmers]God could have sit a hundred chimpanzees at a table to decide the canon and we would still have the Bible today.
[/quote]

No we wouldn’t, the bible is a fourth century book. Christ never told anyone to write a book. If the early Church never canonized the books of the bible you would have no knowledge of what scripture is.


#15

I like history :smiley: particularly the interpretation of scripture throughout history.


#16

[quote=CindyGia]Once you come to realize what the Eucharist is - HOW IN THE WORLD can you pass up receiving Jesus in the Eucharist?

I cannot understand Protestants who when they come to realize that the Eucharist is the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ, that they still will pass it up because their friends and family disapprove. How and why in the world would any Christian not want to receive Jesus in the Eucharist?

It’s unfathomable to me. I just don’t get it.
[/quote]

I am sure that those who have come to this conclusion but still are struggling on making the leap want the Eucharist. It is still a tough decision for these people.


#17

[quote=jimmy]I am sure that those who have come to this conclusion but still are struggling on making the leap want the Eucharist. It is still a tough decision for these people.
[/quote]

One thing I have also learned from school is that simply knowing about something might not change how you feel about it and does not necessarily make you understand it completely.

For example: Simply knowing that you are depressed or happy does not necessarily change that fact. If protestants are constantly told that it is a symbol and nothing more, its hard to come out of that thinking even after knowing that it is so much more than that. It just doesn’t happen that fast…it takes time.


#18

[quote=zachattack05]One thing I have also learned from school is that simply knowing about something might not change how you feel about it and does not necessarily make you understand it completely.

For example: Simply knowing that you are depressed or happy does not necessarily change that fact. If protestants are constantly told that it is a symbol and nothing more, its hard to come out of that thinking even after knowing that it is so much more than that. It just doesn’t happen that fast…it takes time.
[/quote]

You are wise beyond your years.


#19

[quote=jimmy]No we wouldn’t, the bible is a fourth century book. Christ never told anyone to write a book. If the early Church never canonized the books of the bible you would have no knowledge of what scripture is.
[/quote]

the Church did canonize the bible… but, it was lead by the
Holy Spirit… God…

so, the bible was the result of God’s will being done…

i think that’s all he was saying…

:slight_smile:


#20

[quote=johnshelby]the Church did canonize the bible… but, it was lead by the
Holy Spirit… God…

so, the bible was the result of God’s will being done…

i think that’s all he was saying…

:slight_smile:
[/quote]

I would agree with that.


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