History doesn't lie


#1

It was a real struggle to accept my Catholic faith. For I was a stubborn evangelical for many years. I had tons of evangelical doctrine books, software and study bibles as well. Believe me I DIDN’T WANT TO BECOME A CATHOLIC. But history doesn’t lie, especially early church history.

                           Two things really won me over and that was the new birth found in water baptism and the real presence of our Lord in the blessed Eucharist. Before my acceptance I read every evangelical book I could to find, for reasons enough to explain away the truths of these things. I read where baptism was just a sign of an inward grace and communion was a solemn occasion of remembrance of what our Lord did. But when I examined the OVERWHELMING writings of the church fathers NONE of them believed such a thing! They ALL held to baptism BEING the new birth and our Lord really being real IN the hosts of the Eucharist. Evangelical writers totally ignore these truths.

                                 So here I was in a dilemma. I had to choose and be honest with myself and with real church history. Now I have peace, because I have accepted these blessed sacraments of baptism and the Eucharist as the Catholic church all along has taught. I wanted to tell you about this, because maybe some of you are straddling the fence with some issues as I did. If you are post it here. I love to hear your testimony.

#2

Sounds like you put a lot of work into your research. Welcome home!

It’s true that history doesn’t lie. But history can be distorted, and so few people are familiar with real historical methods that they easily come to believe historical lies, which have become more abundant in the last half century.


#3

Wow! May God bless you, and keep you always in His hands.

I just have to ask you, as a convert: what was your experience with confession? I ask because the more I grow in my faith, the more I love the sacrament of confession.


#4

I’m a revert. About a decade ago I came to a crisis of faith. I then went about studying other religions to see if they were for me.

After a few years of study, I found, mostly through histroy and critical thinking, that the Church was His Church.

It has taken me a few more years to come back into the fold. I have never really “Left the Church”, I just sort of avoided the whole thing to work through what I had to work through.

Last spring I attended mass for the first time in over 5 years. This last summer I took communion for the first time in over a decade.

The feelings are indescribable. I have just recently met a good Catholic woman, and it appears that the Lord has put me through these trials so that I could find her and find myself.

I am very happy that you have also found this wonderful thing in your life.

Pax Tecum Mei Amicus.


#5

[quote=buflineks]I’m a revert. About a decade ago I came to a crisis of faith. I then went about studying other religions to see if they were for me.

After a few years of study, I found, mostly through histroy and critical thinking, that the Church was His Church.
[/quote]

Me too, although after I decided I had to make an honest search it took me less than a year to “come home”.

Although my search made me choose the RCC through Reason and conviction, it took a while longer to make the “heart” connection.

PS It was actually a couple of Mormon missionaries who started me on the journey home. :rotfl:


#6

sherlock

             Confession to a priest is awkward for me, because you have to do the right thing when entering and memorize a repentant prayer of sorts. I keep forgetting the proper procedure and proper words. It would be nice if I could just go into the confessional room, cross myself. Let Father start and then confess my sin and just tell God I'm sorry in my own words. I can't remember the prepared response at all. So I get tongue tied and nervous.

#7

[quote=kyleforu]sherlock

             Confession to a priest is awkward for me, because you have to do the right thing when entering and memorize a repentant prayer of sorts. I keep forgetting the proper procedure and proper words. It would be nice if I could just go into the confessional room, cross myself. Let Father start and then confess my sin and just tell God I'm sorry in my own words. I can't remember the prepared response at all. So I get tongue tied and nervous.

[/quote]

After the first 1000 confessions, it becomes second nature. :slight_smile:


#8

[quote=kyleforu]sherlock

             Confession to a priest is awkward for me, because you have to do the right thing when entering and memorize a repentant prayer of sorts. I keep forgetting the proper procedure and proper words. It would be nice if I could just go into the confessional room, cross myself. Let Father start and then confess my sin and just tell God I'm sorry in my own words. I can't remember the prepared response at all. So I get tongue tied and nervous.

[/quote]

I had the same problem! But, I have a couple of tips for you. First, you can ask your parish to do what my parish now does…put a cheet sheet in the confessional that has a few of the responses on it. Helps a lot.

The other thing that you need to know is that there is no doctrine on the prepared response. You can wing it as long as you come up with words that express that you are sorry down to the depths of your soul for your sin. Keep that in mind. I have done it a few times and I have not had a priest yell at me yet! :thumbsup:


#9

[quote=JimG]After the first 1000 confessions, it becomes second nature. :slight_smile:
[/quote]

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: Oh man that is funny, but really why do I still feel nervous then. :smiley:


#10

Well, I still get nervous, and I’ve lost count of how many thousands now, and sometimes I forget what to say as well. If that happens, just say, “I forgot what comes next.”


#11

Hi Kyleforu!

Yep, history does point to the Catholic Church. As someone who was raised Baptist, History had a 1400 year gap between the Apostiles and the Reformation.:rolleyes:

(Saw your post on the DCF - welcomne there too! :D)


#12

In regards to history being ‘rewritten’ I dont think its very blantent (or even realized by those teaching it. I went to a talk with afirend once about the history of the bible. The ‘pastor’ was asked, wasn’t it catholic monks that spent large portions of their lives copying the bible by hand? His response…

Well, a few church PASTORS did that as well.However, Mostly it was jsut by people who loved the word.

Subtle, so amazingly subtle, and on this one pointmay not be worth countering. but over time, this quite contradictions keep being added and taught until finally the catholci church wasnt around, the bible was compiled by noncatholics, and the catholic church as it is known today didnt even exist until about 1200 AD.

I dot think anyone intentionally does it, but people are so quick to discredit the Church, that they dummy down the truth untill over time the opposite is what is believed.

Just my thoughts

In Christ


#13

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.