History of RCC in the US


#1

After reading another thread, it strikes me that other than a few passages in US history books telling about a few intrepid priests here and there, I learned nothing at all about the Roman Catholic Church in the early years of the US (pre-revolution). Lots about Puritans, though.

Do I need to look for sources relating to specific areas that were settled (New Orleans, areas of Spanish influence, etc) or is there a more general book telling the story? I have a pretty good handle on the earliest Lutherans (my Dad's family descends from the Palatine refugees of 1709 in New York, and Mom's family were from the Old Lutheran migration from Saxony).

Thanks!


#2

Well, in addition to the missionaries who ventured into what later became the US in the days of the Spanish Conquistadores, research the Ark and the Dove. they were 2 ships that came over a few years after the mayflower bringing Catholics to Virginia and Maryland. some of those intrepid pioneers ventured as far as central KY (which was then part of Virginia.)

I had an ancestor on one of those ships who set up a farm and an Inn in KY. he had a "proclivity to the drink," as my genealogist says, and ended up killing a guy in a card game...


#3

[quote="Stilldreamn, post:1, topic:313682"]
After reading another thread, it strikes me that other than a few passages in US history books telling about a few intrepid priests here and there, I learned nothing at all about the Roman Catholic Church in the early years of the US (pre-revolution). Lots about Puritans, though.

Do I need to look for sources relating to specific areas that were settled (New Orleans, areas of Spanish influence, etc) or is there a more general book telling the story? I have a pretty good handle on the earliest Lutherans (my Dad's family descends from the Palatine refugees of 1709 in New York, and Mom's family were from the Old Lutheran migration from Saxony).

Thanks!

[/quote]

Franciscan priests established the mission (later a Cathedral) in Santa Fe, New Mexico in the 1500's. Wonderful history there.


#4

Over here in California, prior to California becoming a state, Franciscans, led by Fr. Junipero Serra, started missions that led Catholicism gain a foothold in California, starting in 1769. You may want to look into California Missions, a string of 21 missions stretching from San Diego to San Francisco.


#5

From an undergrad college history course I had, I learned that all but three of the oringal 13 American colonies had various penal acts that denied Catholics the same rights as other residences of those colonies, in one way or another. For example, Colonial Massachusetts banned priests from living in the colony, the penalty for violating this law was death.

"I did verily believe, as I do still, that much more is to be dreaded from the growth of popery in America, than from the Stamp Act, or any other acts destructive of civil rights." Samuel Adams, 1768

If you look to regions that were settled by English enemies, Spain and France (who were Catholic), you'll find a more vibrant Catholic history. The English settlers had a deep anti-Catholic background, that they brought with them and perpetrated, until the Revolutionary era when penalties against Catholics were relaxed.


#6

I note here that no one has posted any "TITLES" of books which I find most interesting...

So I did a search and here is the results. Looks like some interesting stuff might be found there.

Peace
James


#7

=Stilldreamn;10317155]After reading another thread, it strikes me that other than a few passages in US history books telling about a few intrepid priests here and there, I learned nothing at all about the Roman Catholic Church in the early years of the US (pre-revolution). Lots about Puritans, though.

Do I need to look for sources relating to specific areas that were settled (New Orleans, areas of Spanish influence, etc) or is there a more general book telling the story? I have a pretty good handle on the earliest Lutherans (my Dad's family descends from the Palatine refugees of 1709 in New York, and Mom's family were from the Old Lutheran migration from Saxony).

Thanks!

Have you tried GOOGLING "Old History of the American CC?"


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.