Holy day Catch 22 HELP!


#1

Today is a holy day of obligation, and I have tried to see a priest before evening mass since I have to confess a mortal sin, but non are available before mass. SO, technically, I have to abstain from celebrating mass and receiving communion, but since it is a holy day of obligation I am required to participate. What do I do?!


#2

Go to Mass, but abstain from the Eucharist.


#3

Please attend church! Go and listen to the readings and participate in the liturgy. Offer yourself to Christ on the altar with the gifts. But abstain from receiving the Eucharist until you are able to confess your sins. Same with Sunday mass. :slight_smile:


#4

There is no problem.

You are not required to “abstain from celebrating mass”. (And, BTW, it’s the priest who is the “celebrant”). The obligation to attend mass remains the same whether you receive communion at that mass or not.

You are obligated to refrain from communion if you are aware of serious sin, as you have noted.

So, no problem. Go to mass, don’t receive the Eucharist.


#5

I second this. You seem to have some odd ideas about when to attend mass. As for this,

Either we have a new priest on the forum, or you need to update your terminology. :wink:


#6

You need not abstain from attending Mass.
But you should never receive communion with a mortal sin that needs to be confessed and absolved.
My prayers go out to you and for you. :pray:


#7

Though they differ from one another in essence and not only in degree, the common priesthood of the faithful and the ministerial or hierarchical priesthood are nonetheless interrelated: each of them in its own special way is a participation in the one priesthood of Christ. The ministerial priest, by the sacred power he enjoys, teaches and rules the priestly people; acting in the person of Christ, he makes present the Eucharistic sacrifice, and offers it to God in the name of all the people. But the faithful, in virtue of their royal priesthood, join in the offering of the Eucharist. They likewise exercise that priesthood in receiving the sacraments, in prayer and thanksgiving, in the witness of a holy life, and by self-denial and active charity.

That is how it was described 50 years ago in Lumen Gentium at Vatican II. I am not sure Raske is the one who needs to update his terminology.

In any event, offering the Euchatist with the priest is the important part of the service. Normally this culminates in Communion, but if you feel you are alienated from God, refrain from receiving Communion.


#8

You are still bound to attend Mass. During Communion you remain in your pew and offer it up.


#9

I’m going with a bum knee so I’ll be sitting the entire time. I feel terrible about it but it’s better than staying home. There’s not reason not to attend Mass because you haven’t gone to confession. Sure, it’s no fun sitting there while most everyone goes up, but as @thelittlelady said, offer it up. God bless.


#11

Hmm, yeah, but there’s only one celebrant who celebrates the mass.

You join in this act by going, praying and speaking the responses, and perhaps receiving the Eucharist, but you remain a congregant, not a celebrant.

In the same way, you call in a plumber to fix your sink. You join in this repair by calling him and paying him, but it the plumber who fixes the thing.

Why be picky and conflate the two?


#12

Hmm, no. Acts of contriction with intent to confess can indeed remit mortal sin, but, to make sure, one cannot possibly receive communion before confessing, even after making one.


#13

You are fixating on the technical function of the celebrant – the broad term to celebrate or the celebration of the mass applies to all present participating in the liturgy. Participation is inherently celebratory, see below for textual support/evidence.

Paragraph 1140 of the Catechism states, and I quote: "It is the whole community, the Body of Christ united with its Head, that celebrates. “Liturgical services are not private functions but are celebrations of the Church which is ‘the sacrament of unity,’ namely, the holy people united and organized under the authority of the bishops. Therefore, liturgical services pertain to the whole Body of the Church.”

1141 continues: The celebrating assembly is the community of the baptized who, "by regeneration and the anointing of the Holy Spirit, are consecrated to be a spiritual house and a holy priesthood, that through all the works of Christian men they may offer spiritual sacrifices."9 This “common priesthood” is that of Christ the sole priest, in which all his members participate.

So, according to the Catechism, I would be part of the celebrating assembly. Of course the celebrant as “head” performs a specific function within the overall celebration. This does not mean ipso facto that participants are not celebrating as well – on the contrary we are instructed in the Catechism to celebrate. SO, I don’t have to abstain from celebrating, just receiving communion if not in a state of grace.


#14

Thanks for you support!

Catechism back up!

Paragraph 1140 of the Catechism states, and I quote: "It is the whole community, the Body of Christ united with its Head, that celebrates. “Liturgical services are not private functions but are celebrations of the Church which is ‘the sacrament of unity,’ namely, the holy people united and organized under the authority of the bishops. Therefore, liturgical services pertain to the whole Body of the Church.”

1141 continues: The celebrating assembly is the community of the baptized who, "by regeneration and the anointing of the Holy Spirit, are consecrated to be a spiritual house and a holy priesthood, that through all the works of Christian men they may offer spiritual sacrifices."9 This “common priesthood” is that of Christ the sole priest, in which all his members participate.

So, according to the Catechism, I would be part of the celebrating assembly. Of course the celebrant as “head” performs a specific function within the overall celebration. This does not mean ipso facto that participants are not celebrating as well – on the contrary we are instructed in the Catechism to celebrate. SO, I don’t have to abstain from celebrating, just receiving communion if not in a state of grace.

Appreciate the help


#15

What’s the problem? You are required to assist at mass on the HDO, but you are NOT required to receive communion.


#17

I’m perfectly aware of the words of the Catechism. However, you are still incorrect in saying that, every time you attend, you ‘celebrate’ mass. You see, taken out of context, the Catechism does indeed seem to support this interpretation. However, you are conflating two concepts right here.

You are interpreting the words ‘the whole community, the Body of Christ united with its Head’ as meaning ‘the congregation which I am part of.’ That is not what the authors of that most venerable document intended to convey. The mystery is far, far greater than that.

You see, at the heart of the Catholic understanding of the mass is that the Body of Christ- yes, the Church- is present at each Eucharistic sacrifice in its three states: triumphant, penitent and militant. That is, the whole communion of saints, the holy souls, and the congregants join to form this ‘community.’

The priest, meanwhile, acting in persona Christi, leads this celebration by bringing about the eucharistic miracle: he alone is the ‘celebrant’ as an individual presence. And so, whereas each individual works by his prayers as part of the entity that is celebrating, he is not himself the celebrant.

I hope I have made myself clear.


#18

You are welcome to be a congregant attending mass.

I will be there celebrating with all the saints in heaven and on earth.


#19

Please refer to:

Image inclusive, to witness my two-dimensional view of the mass.

Thanks!


#20

The very first of the conditions for such listed in the link you provided is:

In the case of the OP what is the grave reason?


#21

What are you talking about? All I said was

which is correct. What’s your point?

I’d also recommend not posting links that undermine your argument.

Do you want me to quote the Catechism at you? I can and I will.


#22

quit fitzing

i quit, lol


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.