Holy Water


#1

I read on Fisheaters.com that it is permissible to add a few drops of Holy Water to food, is this true? For example, if I wanted to add a few drops to my water (plain, bottled drinking water.) that I drink, is this alright? Is it considered a Holy practice? Thank you.


#2

You can drink it straight if you want.

You might want to look into 'blessed salt' as well.

May I add, that saying grace before eating or drinking is an essential practice in general. :) You should make a habit of it, every single time. There are great benefits.


#3

Definitely say grace :). And thank you! I add it to my water now, just in case ha.:)

What about Blessed Salt, do you add it to food as well?


#4

Yes, or you simply sprinkle it around the house.


#5

Thank you very much! :)


#6

You’re welcome!

It’s amazing how these simple practices of devotion with blessed salt and holy water can change and improve lives. :slight_smile:

Words do not suffice. Deo gratias.

Holy water, and blessed salt, for holy life. :slight_smile:


#7

Perhaps someone from an Orthodox Church will clarify, but I’m quite sure that it is common practice in Orthodox traditions to drink holy water. As for Catholics, while I don’t know personally of anyone who drinks holy water on a regular basis, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with it. On a practical and safety note, make sure that the water is fresh if you choose to drink it - just like unblessed water it becomes stagnant and algae will start to grow: I imagine you could potentially become quite ill if you’re not careful. For myself, I would be more inclined to use it externally - I bless myself with holy water frequently, especially when I’m leaving the house.


#8

I have been a practicing Catholic all my (long) life and had worked for the church for many years before retirement, and now as a volunteer in 2 parishes. I have never seen blessed salt, nor have I ever known of anyone using it. Is it a “local” practice? By that, I mean, is it more common in certain parts of the country or with certain ethnic groups?

This is very interesting as many posters have mentioned it in various topic threads.

Must add: I’m familiar with the salt used in the ceremony of Baptism. I’m just curious about using it in daily life as mentioned here.


#9

[quote="kujayhawk, post:8, topic:177048"]
I have been a practicing Catholic all my (long) life and had worked for the church for many years before retirement, and now as a volunteer in 2 parishes. I have never seen blessed salt, nor have I ever known of anyone using it. Is it a "local" practice? By that, I mean, is it more common in certain parts of the country or with certain ethnic groups?

This is very interesting as many posters have mentioned it in various topic threads.

Must add: I'm familiar with the salt used in the ceremony of Baptism. I'm just curious about using it in daily life as mentioned here.

[/quote]

Blessed salt is what is used to make holy water, part of it. There's also of course, the water.

The older ritual books contain the proper blessings for these. A priest who doesn't use these won't be giving you quite as helpful a sacramental, so one should go to a traditional parish for the proper blessings. It is more than just a sign of the cross. :D


#10

It certainly is more than just a sign of the cross, but the current ritual books may be regarded as also containing the proper blessings for holy water, since they have been set down and approved by the Church. As long as the rite of blessing is carried out according to what is set out in the books - whether pre- or post-1984, then the water will be “properly” blessed.


#11

When my sister was diagnosed with stage three throat cancer in April 2009… the first specialists she saw gave her very little hope for treatment-except drastic and mutilating surgery-they did not think she would survive chemo-as she was very fragile healthwise with four previous heartattacks and extremely low weight at 95 lbs…and if she didn’t have immediate surgery- they felt the tumor would cut off her air in a matter of weeks… her daughter managed to find a doctor at Vanderbilt that would treat her in her fragile state with low dose chemo to try to shrink the tumor enough to remove without losing her vocal chords etc in the process-before they left to go to Nashville I was given in prayer the impression to have her drink HolyWater- she thought I was nuts- but humored me because I was very insistent…I had people all over the world praying for her… by July the tumor had not only shrunk- it had completely disappeared!..(thank you Jesus)…The radiologist said he wouldn’t even be able to tell them where to operate…I’ve offered this to several who were facing somewhat hopeless situations- and all have been helped physically and spiritually…how special is that- Holy water-chicken soup from above for body and soul:…:thumbsup:::):smiley:


#12

No actually, the words matter. If a priest blesses something with a few words, that indicate one type of blessing – that is the type it gets. If the words are changed to be another type, it gains another type.

If you read the prayers for the older blessings and the newer ones, you will see the newer is hardly of the same signficance at all and indeed, explicitly less of effect.

So, no, just because it’s in one book that the Church puts out doesn’t mean it’s of the same level as a different book the Church put out.


#13

[quote="Jacob21, post:1, topic:177048"]
I read on Fisheaters.com that it is permissible to add a few drops of Holy Water to food, is this true? For example, if I wanted to add a few drops to my water (plain, bottled drinking water.) that I drink, is this alright? Is it considered a Holy practice? Thank you.

[/quote]

Frankly I would not recommend that. One Church I attended uses collected rainwater for Holy Water and some parishioners who drank it got sick.

If you want something in your food stick to Blessed Salt.


#14

Well, if that’s where they get their water from I wouldn’t recommend it either. I believe it’s more normal to take more care that it is fresh. If in doubt… ask a priest how fresh it is.


#15

For drinking and eating purposes- it is perfectly ok-it worked for my sister… to take bottled spring water and sea salt and ask the Priest to Bless it… no need to risk possibly contaminated water or salt…God knows your heart:)


#16

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