Hope in times of coronavirus

Hello!
I have always said that in these times of crises, what we really lack is hope and perspective. I know for sure that I’ll stay at home today, I know I’ll be there tomorrow, but I don’t know when this will end. Planning things in the very near future becomes impossible and so you are stuck in your home, in your mind and in your own universe. The Spe Salvi Encyclical does not speak of this kind of hope that we are lacking today, that is to say the hope that this ilness will be cured, but more precisely, it speaks of a higher kind of hope, in something divine, in a final justice and a fraternal communion that will take place in the so-called times of the past, times we do not know when they will come or if they will come while we are still alive.

The central component of the whole encyclical is the equivalence between the Christian faith and hope. The Bible often uses these words interchangeably. I quote, “Paul reminds the Ephesians that before they knew Christ (the Ephesians) they were hopeless and without God in the world” (Spe Salvi 2 pg 4). Thus, the encounter with Christ represents the true hope, that is, to know the true God.

But what about us, those who consider ourselves Christians? Where is our hope? Where is our perspective? Am I the only one who stays in the house thinking that this lethargy will last forever? Or are there other people who think that we need help from God to strengthen our hope in this time of crises? I can’t wait to see what you think

2 Likes

Thanks for your post :slight_smile:
I’m thinking this has to be the best possible Lent I’ve ever had…if I use it wisely .
God bless us all,and Keep the Faith ! :slight_smile: :pray:

4 Likes

I always wondered what it might be like to live like a hermit. Here I find both support (we are in this together) and expectation (we must, as our individual and collective survival may depend on it).

I must work on my orientation: am I more tuned into what I perceive to be missing, or am I beginning to be open to what I have, that is apart from that, the unchangeable.

1 Like

I agree, It’s all about how we relate to this situation. But what if the situation worsens and the pandemic lasts longer than expected? Our hope must ultimately be Christ and his promise of the eternal life.

4 Likes

We humans live whether we realize it or not, with one foot on earth and one foot in heaven (by the mercy of God).

In these times of pandemic, I think I must be practical in doing what is in my power to remain healthy, as well as doing my part in helping others to remain healthy. I have a responsibility to do that much.

Spiritually, I rely on God to lead me. If I die, I die. :woman_shrugging:t2: Then may God have mercy on my soul.

4 Likes

Philippians 1:20 and following.

1 Like

Any other opinions?

Saint Paul summarizes what could/should/would be the universal Christian mindset. Strongly desiring to leave this earth so as to experience the beatific vision, but resigning oneself to service of the Lord until He calls.

1 Like

A thing that I am very thankful for and feel is providential, is that our Prime Minister of Australia is a practicing Christian and as a leader, is facilitating practical measures against the virus, economic measures to protect people from falling through the cracks during this time… but also he openly speaks about prayer and having faith in God during this time.

1 Like

Faith, Hope, & Love. There has always been massive tragic events throughout time in our world. In those times our Lord raises up great Saints so that the light may shine through the darkness. As long as we see the Light, and as long as we are instruments to shine that light, we all have hope.

I think of all the darkest moments in my life, and there have been many, no matter how bad things seemed at the time, there was always hope. None of us are promised all of today, much less tomorrow here on Earth, but we are ALL promised eternity through Christ our Savior.

Stay focused, keep the faith, share the love, and deliver the hope. Give those around us hope who may not see the Light yet, it’s a great time to live the Gospel.

2 Likes

We are the first generation of humans on planet earth who are willingly submitting ourselves to a daily barrage of bad news. We have the ability (even if not the desire) to know virtually every evil that exists and that has come to pass. We know that things on earth are bad, evil, destructive of peace, but our morbid curiosity impels us to check to see just how badly things are becoming.

Where is peace in all of this?

God never overburdens us, but His permissive will allows us to overburden ourselves so that we may, even out of desperation, turn back to Him. Daily and throughout the day.

2 Likes

Eventually it will end. Nobody likes being told what to do and being locked up in their house and nobody likes the idea of a virus going about. But i try to think of the bigger picture. It’s a great opportunity to pray for others and those who are to suffer the most from this situation, and it’s a good time to get closer to God.

What else is there to do anyway lool. :wink:

1 Like

More bad news, great. :rage:

1 Like

Ah, but we are in control of how much bad news we choose to absorb. Therefore…

Choose wisely.

2 Likes

Our hope is in the Lord. We have human perspective, we cry out, Lord why have you abandoned me!
But we refocus. We meditate on the truth of Jesus Christ and let that be our heartbeat.

1 Like

This topic was automatically closed 14 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.