hot cross buns..


#1

At the conclusion of Good Friday mass, the priest tell us there are hot cross buns for sale in the foyer, at only one dollar, proceeds to the poor.
My sister is dissillusioned at this, and tells me, this is exactly what made Jesus angry in his temple where he went to pray 2 days before his execution people selling their wares, and using the temple as a market place. Was this wrong of the catholic church I attend?

shae


#2

(Gee, I hope I don’t come across as too liberal for this ;))
One of the differences perhaps is that the moneychangers were exploiting the faithful, while the money from your church goes to a good cause. Perhaps they should have sold them outside of the church, if possible. And perhaps that particular food should not have been sold on Good Friday.


#3

What Danny said except for the part about a different food.

Hot Cross Buns are very catholic in tradiition and is perfect as Good Friday is a day of Fast and Absintence, which means one meal and one snack and no meat.

catholic.org/clife/lent/friday.php

** Hot Cross Buns.** The familiar hot cross buns are sweet rolls with the sign of the cross cut into it, and they are one of several traditional European breads marked with a cross for Good Friday. According to tradition, these buns originated at St Alban’s Abbey in 1361, where the monks gave them to the poor people who came there. (You may have your own recipe for sweet-rolls to which you can add currants or raisins before shaping and cut a cross in the top before baking; or you can buy them.) These Good Friday buns were very popular, and were sold by vendors who cried,

Hot cross buns, Hot cross buns! One a-penny two a-penny, Hot cross buns! If you have no daughters, give 'em to your sons! One a-penny two a-penny, Hot cross buns!


#4

[quote=gelsbern]What Danny said except for the part about a different food.

Hot Cross Buns are very catholic in tradiition and is perfect as Good Friday is a day of Fast and Absintence, which means one meal and one snack and no meat.

catholic.org/clife/lent/friday.php
[/quote]

My bad, I didn’t recall that. I was expecting I might have to correct some part of that post, lol… it just seemed kind of on the ‘sweeter’ side of things to me. Should’ve recalled that song from the early school days…


#5

[quote=Shae]At the conclusion of Good Friday mass, the priest tell us there are hot cross buns for sale in the foyer, at only one dollar, proceeds to the poor.
My sister is dissillusioned at this, and tells me, this is exactly what made Jesus angry in his temple where he went to pray 2 days before his execution people selling their wares, and using the temple as a market place. Was this wrong of the catholic church I attend?

shae
[/quote]

These days I feel like I say much less about what I think is wrong or right. I do understand how your sister might have felt though. Good Friday is such a solemn day and to have an interuption of any kind of an announcement at the end of the service must have simply felt terrible. I think the feelings that were aroused in your sister had everything to do with the stark contrast in thoughts in her heart and mind when the interuption was made. Perhaps Jesus was angry in part because he went to the temple to pray and was disturbed by the interruption of business dealings. Jesus is Divine but he is also human. He understands exactly how we feel.

These days I am very annoyed by the number of announcements at the end of Mass on any given Sunday. They have become too lengthy and frankly I don’t want to hear it. Isn’t that what bulletins are for? In the ‘old days’ we never had to tolerate such nasty business. Business it is.

I believe the GIRM permits announcements but they are to be kept to a minimum.
What is minimum for me? No announcements.
What is minimum for the next guy? Perhaps several pages.


#6

Just tell your sister to chill out. As Catholics we tend to get a little kooky about the hot cross bun deal. Many of us give up sweets and deserts during lent and when we’ve almost made it to Easter, out come the hot cross buns to spoil our record. It’s been a while for treats so some of us practically make pigs of ourselves devouring them and don’t even feel guilty about it because it’s “tradition”. I think it’s the perfect symbol of human nature, we strive to be perfect but when it gets close to the wire we fall. Tell your sister we’ll be perfect once we reach heaven.


#7

Home-baked cross buns have been a Good Friday tradition in our family for years.


#8

I have nothing against selling things in the church foyer. In fact I always support the bake sales, … as they are for a good cause and my son gets a homemade treat.

As for hot cross buns- growing up we always had them on Holy Thursday for tea time ( Good Friday) is fasting. But my Husband grew up having then for breakfast on Good Friday, so that is what we have done for since we got married. But this year, I did not make it to the store in time to buy them so we had hot cross buns on Saturday for tea.


#9

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