How 911 calls on blacks are a new twist on something old: white flight


#1

#2

Is it “white flight” when black people call 911 on other black people too? I can’t say for sure, but I’m pretty sure black people are inclined to call 911 when being shot at by other black people, as happens often in places like Washington DC, Chicago, Baltimore, Detroit, etc…


#3

It is a pity you don’t see it. Have a good day…


#4

you are going to have to explain this for us non americans


#5

911 is the phone number used in the USA to reach emergency services (police, fire, medical). Usually it is discouraged that this be called for less urgent situations.

There have been many stories over the past few years of 911 being used to report African-Americans for engaging in innocuous and normal activities. A lady called the police on a group of black women as they were packing their car on the last day of their AirBnB rental. A group of black people were having a BBQ in the park. A black man moving his belongings into an apartment. A black man walking on a sidewalk.

The article presents that this is an extension and evolution of older practices to make black people feel unwelcomed and stay out of certain areas. In times passed this included Sundown Towns (towns in which violence and harassment were used against African Americans if they tried to spend the night in the town), the creation of “exclusive” neighborhoods in which only white people were allowed to buy and finance homes, police harassment, and more. From the perspective of the article there is continuity between the old and modern practices.


#6

I actually wasn’t taught that white flight was some big racist thing. I know at least in the case of Detroit and other big cities there were riots and other such scary events. Generally speaking whites had the money to move out of the environment in the city and blacks didn’t.


#7

True, but historically there were regulations and practices to ensure that non-white people could not purchase in certain areas including but not limited to the practice of red-lining.


#8

There were elements of racism because even before the riots, a lot of white people would immediately move from a neighborhood if they saw blacks moving in. The assumption was that the property values as well as the condition of the neighboring properties would decline, so if you wanted to recover your investment as a white homeowner (the home usually being a US person’s biggest asset) then you needed to sell fast. Real estate agents actually had strategies to capitalize on this. It had also happened in past years with Jewish people moving into Christian neighborhoods. There had been some restrictive laws preventing Jewish people and/or nonwhites from moving into certain neighborhoods, but following WWII a series of court cases did away with most of the laws, so you started getting a lot of white flight.

Even in recent years I’ve seen a few of the suburbs around my home city go from predominantly white to predominantly African-American in this manner, usually accompanied by a decrease in the property tax base, a decrease in the quality of the local public schools (which are funded in USA largely by property taxes), and an increase in crime.


#9

#10

Many of the 911 calls were calls about suspicious activity or outright violations of the law. Are Blacks immune from being the subject of such calls?


#11

But it’s only the gap-toothed, inbred, alt-right hillbilly faction, right?


#12

None of the ones mentioned by LbN fall in this category, unless you mean all things are suspicious if the subject is black. Perhaps you can give many examples.


#13

There was a call because an African American man wore socks at the pool.


#14

He wore socks after being asked not to by the property manager. You aren’t supposed to wear non bathing attire in pools. The fabric can clog the system. So it wasn’t that he wore socks. It was that he refused to respect the authority of the property manager.

Had the cops asked him to do it and he refused they would have used any force they felt necessary to get him to comply including hitting, punching, or using a taser or a gun.


#15

Do me a favor, find me a legal statute on the books that say sock are prohibited at the pool.


#16

Why would you think there needs to be a law against it? The issue was misuse of the pool and likely a violation of posted pool rules. It is a property issue. The property manager has control over the pool. I’m sure there are pool rules which state you must wear swim attire and also rules against entering the pool with a sore. For both of those reasons the man would be misusing the facility and liable to be ejected.

If you still aren’t sure go try to wear socks in a government pool. They’ll call the police on you the same as happened here if you refuse to comply with the rules.


#17

#18

Sounds like it’s not a legal matter or an emergency.

Per the article above, the other people wearing non-swimwear in the pool were not addressed. Had such a policy been applied more uniformly (and with a better approach) I think things could have ended more harmoniously.


#19

Government pool?


#20

If he wasn’t breaking any laws then calling the police was unnecessary.


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