How an Arizona grandma's dead body wound up in a Pentagon blast experiment without permission


#1

How an Arizona grandma’s dead body wound up in a Pentagon blast experiment without permission: reut.rs/2hglRmH


#2

Strange. .rs is registered to Serbia.

Ed


#3

Fascinating, but good grief, what a bizarre story. I fear that phrase “body broker” is going to stick in my memory.


#4

The human body is legally not property, so no-one should be allowed to make a profit by trading in them.

That said, science is science, and even if she ended up not becoming part of an Alzheimer cure but helping others survive IEDs, some good came of the situation. It was still wrong though.

ICXC NIKA


#5

I remember a human anatomy class I had in college, and on the very first day the instructor showed up and pulled a human head out of a bucket. :eek: I immediately stood up, spun on my heel, and strolled out of that classroom, never ever to return. I found out much later that that was actually totally illegal. I’m not sure how or why he did it, but it’s apparently 100% against the law to display a deceased person’s face and head like that.


#6

I didn’t click on the link bc of the nation of origin. If true, that’s horrible. May she RIP.

Even if this had occurred in a Gross Anatomy lab it would be inappropriate to have the head in a bucket. Specimens are usually kept in a sealed glass container. When I was in dental school we had 16 cadavers for Gross Anatomy. We were told before going in the first day that the bodies were to be treated with respect. We were to appreciate the fact that the person donated their body so that we could learn from them. On the wall was a list with information on each body. We knew how old the person was, cause of death and their occupation. I prayed for the man that we worked on and his family. I still think about him and the life he had.


#7

maltmom, I thought that was the way “it” works. I know an MD who, many years later, tells me that s/he still remembers the body (a Lady) from whom s/he learned. The Doctor’s demeanor changed from a loving to a very touched and loving person when telling me this.

The son is the one who donated the “Grandmother’s body” for Alzheimer’s research. Is it the next of kin or the person him/herself who may donate his or her own body? In the U.S.A., would that vary from State to State?

From the article:

The body-brokering business is distinct from organ transplantation, in which hearts, livers, eyes and lungs are carefully removed from the dead to extend or enrich the lives of the living.

I thought the person (donor) is kept alive to remove the organs and actually dies when the organ (like the heart) is removed.

I am only asking questions.


#8

In general, it is the person who completes and signs the forms to donate their body. In my state, the next of kin can make the request. Unless some states, if the family requests, their family member’s ashes will be returned to them. Another point is that if a student knew the person while alive, they will immediately remove the body from the lab. One our groups was getting a replacement body. He was a dwarf, about my age. I happened to mention to an instructor that I was friends with dwarf brothers in high school…21 years before. I had to go in before our class to view the body. I didn’t think it was one of them so we proceeded. Turns out they are both alive.

For organ donation the person is actually dead before the organs are removed. Life support, which should be called organ support IMHO, keeps the heart and lungs functioning until the organs can be removed. Legally they are pronounced dead at the end of the surgery. Spiritually, I believe their soul left them when their brains died and could no longer maintain organ function. I’ve been to the ICU to visit three friends. When I walked in to see two of them I knew in my heart and soul that they were gone. Something was missing. The third was still with us. The third is the only one who made it.


#9

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