How are Anglicans (and other protestants) forgiven of sins?


#1

In Catholicism, you have to confess grave sins to a priest to be given absolution and assurance of forgiveness.

How are others forgiven? Or, are they not?


#2

[quote=Cherub]In Catholicism, you have to confess grave sins to a priest to be given absolution and assurance of forgiveness.

How are others forgiven? Or, are they not?
[/quote]

Greetings, Cherub,

You’re going to get a rather different answer from the RCs on this forum I’d guess, but here’s an answer from an Anglo-Catholic (n.b.: not a Protestant) about Anglicans.

Anglicans are forgiven just the way RCs are, by the grace of God, upon confession, repentance and purpose of amendment, usually through the offices of a priest (remember, Anglican’s consider their Holy Orders perfectly valid), who pronounces absolution after confession. Anglicans do practice auricular confrssion, just as do RCs, but generally the general confession suffices. Private confession (some should, all may, none must) is always available.

As I said, the RC perspective on this is going to be radically different. As on other matters, as well.

As to Protestants, I’m sure one will reply.

GKC

Anglicanus Catholicus


#3

[quote=GKC]Greetings, Cherub,

You’re going to get a rather different answer from the RCs on this forum I’d guess, but here’s an answer from an Anglo-Catholic (n.b.: not a Protestant) about Anglicans.

Anglicans are forgiven just the way RCs are, by the grace of God, upon confession, repentance and purpose of amendment, usually through the offices of a priest (remember, Anglican’s consider their Holy Orders perfectly valid), who pronounces absolution after confession. Anglicans do practice auricular confrssion, just as do RCs, but generally the general confession suffices. Private confession (some should, all may, none must) is always available.

As I said, the RC perspective on this is going to be radically different. As on other matters, as well.

As to Protestants, I’m sure one will reply.

GKC

Anglicanus Catholicus
[/quote]

And in any case, God is not tied to His own sacraments - so forgiveness does not come only by them


#4

[quote=Gottle of Geer]## And in any case, God is not tied to His own sacraments - so forgiveness does not come only by them ##
[/quote]

Greetings, GoG,

Very true, and a gentle answer.

GKC


#5

This is the regular prayer of confession in a United Methodist church:

Merciful God,
we confess that we have not always loved you with our whole heart;
we have failed to be an obedient church.
We have not done your will.
We have broken your law.
We have rebelled against your love.
We have not loved our neighbors, and
we have not heard the cry of the needy.
Forgive us, we pray; free us for joyful obedience,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The word of the presider/pastor
Hear the good news; Christ died for us while we were yet sinners. That proves God’s love toward us. In the name of Jesus Christ, you are forgiven.

The people respond:

In the name of Jesus Christ, you are forgiven.

All: Glory to God. Amen.

Also… church law protects all confidences as inviolate. While there is no formal rite of confession, many people do come to their pastor to confess sins and transgressions.

O+


#6

It is rather interesting to note that in the LDS church there is a policy that certain sins having a ‘public’ aspect–fornication, adultery, civil crimes are examples–must not only confess such sins privately but must present themselves to their ward bishopric (one or more of the leaders of a ward–the ‘head’ of the ward being a bishop, who together with two counselors, consititutes a ‘bishopric’) for confession. If the offense is serious enough it may be referred upward to the stake presidency (again, this consists of a Stake President plus two counselors, a ‘stake’ being roughly equivalent to a diocese).

The consequences of chuch discipline vary from simple counsel, to an informal suspension of a member’s privilege of excercising certain offices within the church, to denyng the member the privilege of receiving the Sacrament, to formal suspension of a member’s rights and privileges, to disfellowshipping of a member, to excommunication. (Disfellowshipping of members is seen to be less serious and usually is an action taken with the assumption that the member will seek or is already seeking full reinstatement after a set ‘term’ of time and after other conditions of repentance are met; excommunication is deemed much more serious and usually seems to assume that the disciplined member is uninterested at the time the action is being taken in being eventually reconciled to the Church).

From the perspective of the LDS Church, it acts in the role of Christ in hearing such confessions, establishing conditions for the pentitent person to meet to display true repentance and to make restitution to any others who suffered harm, and granting the member full retoration to fellowship once all conditions have been met. In this sense the LDS Church sees itself having a role not too dissimilar from that of the Roman Catholic priest. However-- for most sorts of sinful behaviors, the individual Mormon confesses only to God–and, if some other party were injured by the offense, to confess to that person and make restitution as possible.


#7

1 John 1:9 - If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

I believe that God forgives sins through Jesus Christ our Lord. Also the Priest has authority to forgive sins as a in body representative of Christ, (6th week RCIA). I can’t wait to hear with my ears, “my son you’re sins are forgiven”, although Christ has forgiven me. Peace to all.


#8

My understanding of the Catholic position is that , yes, other Christians may be still be forgiven their sins, but only if they drop dead immediately upon baptism.

From the Catechism:*
977 Our Lord tied the forgiveness of sins to faith and Baptism: "Go into all the world and preach the gospel to the whole creation. He who believes and is baptized will be saved."521 Baptism is the first and chief sacrament of forgiveness of sins because it unites us with Christ, who died for our sins and rose for our justification, so that "we too might walk in newness of life."522

978 "When we made our first profession of faith while receiving the holy Baptism that cleansed us, the forgiveness we received then was so full and complete that there remained in us absolutely nothing left to efface, neither original sin nor offenses committed by our own will, nor was there left any penalty to suffer in order to expiate them. .æ.æ. Yet the grace of Baptism delivers no one from all the weakness of nature. On the contrary, we must still combat the movements of concupiscence that never cease leading us into evil "523 *

OS Luke- as far as general confessional formulae go, my favorite is the one used in Rite I of the BCP:

Almighty God,
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
maker of all things, judge of all men:
We acknowledge and bewail our manifold sins
and wickedness,
which we from time to time most grievously have committed,
by thought, word, and deed, against thy divine Majesty,
provoking most justly thy wrath and indignation against us.
We do earnestly repent,
and are heartily sorry for these our misdoings;
the remembrance of them is grievous unto us,
the burden of them is intolerable.
Have mercy upon us,
have mercy upon us, most merciful Father;
for thy Son our Lord Jesus Christ’s sake,
forgive us all that is past;
and grant that we may ever hereafter
serve and please thee in newness of life,
to the honor and glory of thy Name;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.*


#9

[quote=GKC]Greetings, Cherub,

You’re going to get a rather different answer from the RCs on this forum I’d guess, but here’s an answer from an Anglo-Catholic (n.b.: not a Protestant) about Anglicans.

Anglicans are forgiven just the way RCs are, by the grace of God, upon confession, repentance and purpose of amendment, usually through the offices of a priest (remember, Anglican’s consider their Holy Orders perfectly valid), who pronounces absolution after confession. Anglicans do practice auricular confrssion, just as do RCs, but generally the general confession suffices. Private confession (some should, all may, none must) is always available.

As I said, the RC perspective on this is going to be radically different. As on other matters, as well.

As to Protestants, I’m sure one will reply.

GKC

Anglicanus Catholicus
[/quote]

In nomine Jesu I offer you peace,

This appears to be just how the Catholic Church does it to. I’ve been in Mass when they offer a public (i.e. general) confession of sinfulness and ask for forgiveness. This is always right after the Opening Prayer of the Mass. We have Reconcilation but are only required to do that once a year now-a-days. Do you find that the “Luturgical” Churches are actually moving closer together with regard to general practices? I feel this is so ever since Vatican II.

Peace.


#10

Lutheran view…

Repentance first of all, to acknowledge our sins, to be truly sorry for them. This “godly sorrow” comes from the Holy Spirit convicting us with God’s law.

But the Bible also uses the work of repentance in a broader sense to include faith in Jesus our Savior. This faith is produced by the Holy Spirit, who convinces us through the Gospel that our sins are forgiven for the sake of Jesus, who lived, died and rose again for us.

Put those two concepts together and you have repentance in its fullest sense. (Jesus told His disciples in Luke 24:47 that repentance and forgiveness of sins will be preached in His name to all nations.)

According to the Bible, those who are truly sorry for their sins and trust in Jesus as their Savior also want to turn away from their sins, intending with the help of the Holy Spirit not to keep on living a life of sin. If we want to keep on sinning, we need to ask ourselves if we have really repented. However, we are weak human beings and although we do not want to commit the same sins again and again, we may sometimes fall into sin out of weakness.

Whenever we sin, we know (as John says) that “if we confess our sins, [God] is faithful and just and will forgive our sins” for the sake of Jesus our Savior (1 Jn.1:9). If repentance becomes a “game” with God and we don’t really want or intend to stop committing a certain sin (say stealing), and we go on stealing, living always in that sin of stealing, then we place ourselves in grave spiritual danger. We need to ask that God the Holy Spirit to give us the power to stop committing that sin and trust Him to help us fight against it.

Sad to say, the desire to sin may come back at times, for which we will have to repent again. That’s not the same as living in sin. We all commit all kinds of sins daily, for which we have to daily repent. As long as we are sorry for our sins and believe that God forgives our sins for Christ’s sake, we will be forgiven and have eternal life.


#11

[quote=chrisb]In nomine Jesu I offer you peace,

This appears to be just how the Catholic Church does it to. I’ve been in Mass when they offer a public (i.e. general) confession of sinfulness and ask for forgiveness. This is always right after the Opening Prayer of the Mass. We have Reconcilation but are only required to do that once a year now-a-days. Do you find that the “Luturgical” Churches are actually moving closer together with regard to general practices? I feel this is so ever since Vatican II.

Peace.
[/quote]

Greetings, chrisb,

I would not want to appear to speak for the RCC on this, but, to the best of my knowledge, a general confession in the Mass is not a substitute, in the RCC, for individual, auricular confession, except in very rare circumstances. For the absolution of mortal sin, to ensure that one is in a state of grace to receive the Sacrament, I think that the RCC requires an individual, auricular confession (reconciliation). I await correction.

I fear that I see no particular sign of convergence in the liturgical churches. I wish it were otherwise.

GKC

traditional Anglican


#12

[quote=chrisb]In nomine Jesu I offer you peace,

We have Reconcilation but are only required to do that once a year now-a-days.
Peace.
[/quote]

Unless you are aware of having committed mortal sin. Then ya gotta go as soon as you can get there!


#13

[quote=mean_owen]My understanding of the Catholic position is that , yes, other Christians may be still be forgiven their sins, but only if they drop dead immediately upon baptism.

From the Catechism:*
977 Our Lord tied the forgiveness of sins to faith and Baptism: "Go into all the world and preach the gospel to the whole creation. He who believes and is baptized will be saved."521 Baptism is the first and chief sacrament of forgiveness of sins because it unites us with Christ, who died for our sins and rose for our justification, so that "we too might walk in newness of life."522

978 "When we made our first profession of faith while receiving the holy Baptism that cleansed us, the forgiveness we received then was so full and complete that there remained in us absolutely nothing left to efface, neither original sin nor offenses committed by our own will, nor was there left any penalty to suffer in order to expiate them. .æ.æ. Yet the grace of Baptism delivers no one from all the weakness of nature. On the contrary, we must still combat the movements of concupiscence that never cease leading us into evil "523 *

OS Luke- as far as general confessional formulae go, my favorite is the one used in Rite I of the BCP:

Almighty God,
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
maker of all things, judge of all men:
We acknowledge and bewail our manifold sins
and wickedness,
which we from time to time most grievously have committed,
by thought, word, and deed, against thy divine Majesty,
provoking most justly thy wrath and indignation against us.
We do earnestly repent,
and are heartily sorry for these our misdoings;
the remembrance of them is grievous unto us,
the burden of them is intolerable.
Have mercy upon us,
have mercy upon us, most merciful Father;
for thy Son our Lord Jesus Christ’s sake,
forgive us all that is past;
and grant that we may ever hereafter
serve and please thee in newness of life,
to the honor and glory of thy Name;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.*
[/quote]

(For the info of our friends)

To make the picture more complete, the priest, prior to the people making the General Confession, will say:

Ye who do truly and earnestly repent you of your sins, and are in love and charity with your neighbors, and intend to lead a new life, following the commandments of God, and walking from henceforth in his holy ways; Draw near with faith, and take this holy Sacrament to your comfort; and make your humble confession to Almighty God, devoutly kneeling.

And the people, kneeling, will say the confession as above.

After which point (I quote from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer), the priest, making the sign of the cross, pronounces the absolution:

Almighty God, our heavenly Father, who of his great mercy hath promised forgiveness of sins to all those who with hearty repentance and true faith turn unto him; Have mercy upon you; pardon and deliver you from all your sins; confirm and strengthen you in all goodness; and bring you to everlasting life; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

(And all the people said): Amen

The 1979 book has forms for the auricular confession, very appropriate.

GKC

traditional Anglican


#14

GKC- How do y’all do auricular confession, or do you?


#15

[quote=Cherub]In Catholicism, you have to confess grave sins to a priest to be given absolution and assurance of forgiveness.

How are others forgiven? Or, are they not?
[/quote]

You also have forgiveness of sins through contrition of charity. This is a gift from God that is not exclusive to Catholicism.


#16

…and through the shed blood of Jesus Christ…please don’t forget that part -

[quote=GKC] (remember, Anglican’s consider their Holy Orders perfectly valid)
[/quote]

um, yes - we certainly do.

[quote=GKC] through the offices of a priest who pronounces absolution after confession. Anglicans do practice auricular confrssion, just as do RCs, but generally the general confession suffices. Private confession (some should, all may, none must) is always available.
[/quote]

True. Am with ya 100% on that one:

[quote=GKC] As I said, the RC perspective on this is going to be radically different. As on other matters, as well.
[/quote]

I don’t think it’s THAT radical a difference -* unless you go out of your way to** make*** it radical.

As to Protestants, I’m sure one will reply.

Poor things! They don’t even know Latin…

This is the condescending attitude that contantly negates and invalidates the true spirit of Christianity in the eyes of non-Christians - people playing *“MY church is better than YOUR church” *** What else are they to think ?

January 4th + St. Elizabeth Ann Seton +


#17

[quote=mean_owen]GKC- How do y’all do auricular confession, or do you?
[/quote]

Sure we do. You mean how does it work mechanically?

First the priest preaches sermons, seasonally, and exhorts the people to make use of the sacrament, saying the good Anglican formula “ALL CAN, some should, none must”, cites the relevant portion of the 1928 BCP, announces schedules to hear confession, appointments always available, points out that he will prepare those who have not confessed privately before, reminds all that Father X, or Father Y, or Father Z are also available to hear confessions, by appointment, indicates the booklets on how to make a confession, avaliable on the table in the narthex, and in the parish hall. He then hopes for the best. Usually, he hears confessions at the front of the nave, seated in the first pews, with the penitent entering and kneeling behind him. He dearly wishes that he had a requirement for a confessional, but, none must.

That what you meant?

GKC

traditional Anglican


#18

Greetings, jamesclaude,

[quote=jamesclaude]…and through the shed blood of Jesus Christ…please don’t forget that part -

[/quote]

Indeed, you are correct.

I don’t think it’s THAT radical a difference -* unless you go out of your way to** make*** it radical.

Are you familiar with APOSTOLICAE CURAE? I meant that the RCs would not agree that what I said was happening, was happening, with Anglicans.

Poor things! They don’t even know Latin…

Etiam, mostly. (My daughter taught Latin for 5 years).

GKC

traditional Anglican


#19

My understanding of the Catholic position is that , yes, other Christians may be still be forgiven their sins, but only if they drop dead immediately upon baptism.

I disagree.

A baptized Protestant may live in “good faith” their entire lives. If they commit grave sin (such as heresy), they may not necessarily commit such a sin with full advertence and perfect consent of will. In such a case, the grave sin of heresy is merely material sin, not formal sin. Even if they commit grave sin with full advertence and perfect will, they may receive the gift of contrition from God. A contrite heart remits even the gravest of sins, which must always be coupled with the intention to amend one’s life and do as God wills, due to the divine gift of charity.

See CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Good****Faith (1907-1917)

Good Faith
A phrase employed to designate the mental and moral state of honest, even if objectively unfounded, conviction as to the truth or falsehood of a proposition or body of opinion, or as to the rectitude or depravity of a line of conduct. One who is in this condition, so far as the violation of positive law, or even, in certain junctures, of the natural law, is concerned, is said to labour under an invincible error, and hence to be guiltless. This consideration is often invoked in behalf of those who are outside of the visible affiliation of the Catholic Church.

From Pope St. Pius X:

If he is outside the Church through no fault of his, that is, if he is in good faith, and if he has received Baptism, or at least has the implicit desire of Baptism; and if, moreover, he sincerely seeks the truth and does God’s will as best he can, such a man is indeed separated from the body of the Church, but is united to the soul of the Church and consequently is on the way of salvation. (*Catechism of Pius X, *Ninth Article of the Creed)


#20

Here is the first of two Rites for auricular confession (Reconciliation of Penitents) in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer (ECUSA). It is the one I prefer when hearing confessions (the penitent may choose which rite to use).

Form One

The Penitent begins

Bless me, for I have sinned.

The Priest says

The Lord be in your heart and upon your lips that you may
truly and humbly confess your sins: In the Name of the
Father and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Penitent

I confess to almighty God, to his Church, and to you, that
I have sinned by my own fault in thought, word, and deed, in things done and left undone; especially__________. For these and all other sins which I cannot now remember, I am truly sorry. I pray God to have mercy on me. I firmly intend
amendment of life, and I humbly beg forgiveness of God and his Church, and ask you for counsel, direction, and absolution.
**
Here the Priest may offer counsel, direction, and comfort.
**
The Priest then pronounces this absolution

Our Lord Jesus Christ, who has left power to his Church to
absolve all sinners who truly repent and believe in him, of
his great mercy forgive you all your offenses; and by his
authority committed to me, I absolve you from all your sins:
In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy
Spirit. Amen.

or this

Our Lord Jesus Christ, who offered himself to be sacrificed
for us to the Father, and who conferred power on his Church to forgive sins, absolve you through my ministry by the grace of the Holy Spirit, and restore you in the perfect peace of the Church. *Amen. *
**
The Priest adds

The Lord has put away all your sins.

Penitent Thanks be to God.

The Priest concludes

Go (or abide) in peace, and pray for me, a sinner.

*Declaration of Forgiveness *to be used by a Deacon or Lay Person

Our Lord Jesus Christ, who offered himself to be sacrificed
for us to the Father, forgives your sins by the grace of the
Holy Spirit. Amen.


Notice the “absolvo te” (“I absolve you from all your sins:
In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy
Spirit.”)

Hope this helps.


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