How can we offer the Body and Blood of Christ?


#1

For those of you who are familiar with The Chaplet of Divine Mercy, you will know the opening prayer for each decade

Eternal Father,
I offer you the Body and Blood,
Soul and Divinity of Your Dearly Beloved Son,
Our Lord, Jesus Christ,
in atonement for our sins
and those of the whole world.

How can we offer the Body and Blood of Christ? If God offered up the Body and Blood of Jesus for our sins, how is it that we can do the same, I thought that we could only accept Christ not offer him to God.

I’m totally confused
Can someone please explain this for me
Thanks


#2

Anthony, when I pray this prayer, I think of the Holy Mass where Jesus continually offers Himself to the Father on our behalf. In praying this prayer, I am spiritually joining my soul with the Holy Sacrifice wherever it is being offered at that moment. I am saying I truly believe in the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your Dearly Beloved Son, Please Lord, accept this most perfect sacrifice on behalf of me and the people I love and pray for.

It is one of the deepest mysteries of our Faith that we believe that the perfect sacrifice of Jesus is in some sense on going. This prayer is a very profound statement of that belief and we humbly ask God for His infinite Mercy.

When I am feeling totally confused by aspects of the faith, I try to pray to the Holy Spirit for the gift of understanding–sometimes we can’t quite explain it, but we can understand in our hearts.


#3

“Lord accept the sacrifice at your hands…”

That passage from mass shows that we are indeed offering the body, blood, soul, and divinity of Christ to God. This is possible because Christ allows us to offer this sacrifice. The same is true for all of the sacraments. We are not capable of doing them if not for the will of Christ.


#4

[quote=anthony flavell]For those of you who are familiar with The Chaplet of Divine Mercy, you will know the opening prayer for each decade

Eternal Father,
I offer you the Body and Blood,
Soul and Divinity of Your Dearly Beloved Son,
Our Lord, Jesus Christ,
in atonement for our sins
and those of the whole world.

How can we offer the Body and Blood of Christ? If God offered up the Body and Blood of Jesus for our sins, how is it that we can do the same, I thought that we could only accept Christ not offer him to God.

I’m totally confused
Can someone please explain this for me
Thanks
[/quote]

What are we able to offer to God for the remission of our sins?
Of ourselves, nothing. However we can say to God, " I have nothing to offer to you but what you alone have provided in your great mercy: your dearly beloved Son, our Lord Jesus Christ." I believe that is the context for understanding what it means to say, “I offer you…”

You don’t feel worthy to make such an offering, do you? Good - you shouldn’t! You aren’t worthy except that by the Grace of God He has made it so! And so you are! Turn that feeing of unworthiness into praise of Thanksgiving for this incredible gift!

Phil


#5

[quote=Philthy]What are we able to offer to God for the remission of our sins?
Of ourselves, nothing. However we can say to God, " I have nothing to offer to you but what you alone have provided in your great mercy: your dearly beloved Son, our Lord Jesus Christ." I believe that is the context for understanding what it means to say, “I offer you…”

You don’t feel worthy to make such an offering, do you? Good - you shouldn’t! You aren’t worthy except that by the Grace of God He has made it so! And so you are! Turn that feeing of unworthiness into praise of Thanksgiving for this incredible gift!

Phil
[/quote]

Doesn,t Christ ask us to offer up ourselves as living sacrifices?( romans 12;1) :confused: God Bless.


#6

Offering Christ and ourselves to God in a united fashion is made possible by the Sacrament of the Most Holy Eucharist. During the offertory, the wine and bread are brought forth…this is the sum or the total of all of our love, work, play, sacrifices, thanks etc. We are asked to spiritually attach all of the aspects of our lives in the offering of the bread and the wine. And then upon consecration, our offering is mingled with the offering of Christ in Calvary/Last Supper. At this point, His and our sacrifices are one.

in XT.


#7

[quote=AquinasXVI]Offering Christ and ourselves to God in a united fashion is made possible by the Sacrament of the Most Holy Eucharist. During the offertory, the wine and bread are brought forth…this is the sum or the total of all of our love, work, play, sacrifices, thanks etc. We are asked to spiritually attach all of the aspects of our lives in the offering of the bread and the wine. And then upon consecration, our offering is mingled with the offering of Christ in Calvary/Last Supper. At this point, His and our sacrifices are one.

in XT.
[/quote]

Again Christ asks us to offer up ourselves as living sacrifices.(romans 12;1) Christ does not need to offer sacrifices day after day. Christ sacrificed for our sins once for all when he offered Himself. (Hebrews 7;27) God Bless


#8

How can we ever offer anything? Everything belongs to the divine. We offer back to the divine the best that has been provided for our use. The sacrafice of Jesus was His gift to us, we offer it back to show our gratitude, devotion and recognition of the greatness and generosity of the divine and our perceived unworthiness.

cheddar


#9

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Again Christ asks us to offer up ourselves as living sacrifices.(romans 12;1) Christ does not need to offer sacrifices day after day. Christ sacrificed for our sins once for all when he offered Himself. (Hebrews 7;27) God Bless
[/quote]

I guess you must be a Protestant who thinks Christ died and we are saved no matter how often since then we commit sins. We must remain free from sin and do good works out of faith in hope for salvation.


#10

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Doesn,t Christ ask us to offer up ourselves as living sacrifices?( romans 12;1) :confused: God Bless.
[/quote]

Absolutely! We (as Christians) do this as the body of Christ of course, which remains valid as a sacrifice with merit only through the redemptive work of Christs Crucifixion. Got it?
Hey - be careful spoken. When you start pointing at verses which indicate a sacrifice recommended by an Apostle AFTER the Crucifixion which is described as “holy and pleasing to God” you will quickly discover that IN SOME SENSE although Christs work was finished on Calvary, IN ANOTHER SENSE there remains additional unfinished sacrifice still pleasing to God which “makes up for what is lacking” in Christs sacrifice. And when that happens you really start to understand from a Catholic perspective…

Phil


#11

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Again Christ asks us to offer up ourselves as living sacrifices.(romans 12;1) Christ does not need to offer sacrifices day after day. Christ sacrificed for our sins once for all when he offered Himself. (Hebrews 7;27) God Bless
[/quote]

You are confused. Christ needs nothing, and has needed nothing from all eternity. But as eternal, Christs sacrifice is APPLICABLE for all time, and at any time. And needs do develop in TIME. Think in terms of your own theology of salvation: When did Christ accomplish the forgiveness of sins for us? At the crucifixion, right? It was finished then, right? But when does the APPLICATION of that act take effect? You would say at the time one comes to faith in Christ, right? Salvation is by Grace through Faith, and faith occurs at different times for different people. The eternal sacrifice is made applicable at various times, in time as it applies to our needs.
Another example? I commit sins often enough, unfortunately. Scripture tells us that if we confess our sins we will be forgiven and cleansed. When we confess, we are forgiven. But what is the basis for that forgiveness? Is it not because Christ paid the penalty for our sins 2000 years ago? And although He finished that work, it’s APPLICATION is throughout all time, and in this case, when I confess my sin. Right?

Phil


#12

Frankly I think that is a presumptuous prayer. Yes, we join with Christ in offering His Sacrifice to the Father at Mass, but the prayer you cite does not occur in the Mass, and does not even speak of the fact that Christ offers Himself to the Father, and that we are simply invited to join with His Sacrifice.


#13

Of all of the gifts God give us, which is the greatest gift? His body, blood, soul, and divnity. There is no greater gift on earth. So when we pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, we’re sort of saying, “the most precious thing I have is this gift that Christ gave to me. I treasure it. I need it. It is the most important thing in my life. Yet despite all of that I offer to you my Lord that which I value the greatest, not because you need it, but because I love you.”

Presumptuous? On the contrary. It is a form of humility and dying to self. It is saying all that I have I give to my Lord including His most precious gift to me.

Then too, Christ revealed this prayer to St. Faustina in a private revelation. Pope John Paul II approved and prayed this prayer himself. If it’s good enough for those two…it’s good enough for me.


#14

[quote=StCsDavid]Of all of the gifts God give us, which is the greatest gift? His body, blood, soul, and divnity. There is no greater gift on earth. So when we pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, we’re sort of saying, “the most precious thing I have is this gift that Christ gave to me. I treasure it. I need it. It is the most important thing in my life. Yet despite all of that I offer to you my Lord that which I value the greatest, not because you need it, but because I love you.”

Presumptuous? On the contrary. It is a form of humility and dying to self. It is saying all that I have I give to my Lord including His most precious gift to me.

Then too, Christ revealed this prayer to St. Faustina in a private revelation. Pope John Paul II approved and prayed this prayer himself. If it’s good enough for those two…it’s good enough for me.
[/quote]

StC’sDavid

I think you’ve summed it up perfectly, it makes perfect sense now, I think my problem was that I never considered the possibility that we possess or share in these divine qualities (body and blood, soul and divinity). However I’m still a bit unsure that these qualities are ours to offer, does our connection with Christ really mean we , at least in part, share these divine qualities?


#15

Here’s a link that might help:

ewtn.com/vexperts/showresult.asp?RecNum=443323&Forums=0&Experts=0&Days=2005&Author=&Keyword=Divine+Mercy&pgnu=1&groupnum=0&record_bookmark=21&ORDER_BY_TXT=ORDER+BY+ReplyDate+DESC&start_at=

I recommend reading the sections on Baptism (1213, 1241, 1268) and Holy Orders (1544-1547) of the Catechism and article 10 of Lumen Gentium:
scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c1a1.htm
scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c3a6.htm
vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_const_19641121_lumen-gentium_en.html


#16

[quote=StCsDavid]Then too, Christ revealed this prayer to St. Faustina in a private revelation. Pope John Paul II approved and prayed this prayer himself. If it’s good enough for those two…it’s good enough for me.
[/quote]

Yes, I had thought about that fact, and I readily admit that my perception may be at fault, and not the prayer.


#17

[quote=Philthy]You are confused. Christ needs nothing, and has needed nothing from all eternity. But as eternal, Christs sacrifice is APPLICABLE for all time, and at any time. And needs do develop in TIME. Think in terms of your own theology of salvation: When did Christ accomplish the forgiveness of sins for us? At the crucifixion, right? It was finished then, right? But when does the APPLICATION of that act take effect? You would say at the time one comes to faith in Christ, right? Salvation is by Grace through Faith, and faith occurs at different times for different people. The eternal sacrifice is made applicable at various times, in time as it applies to our needs.
Another example? I commit sins often enough, unfortunately. Scripture tells us that if we confess our sins we will be forgiven and cleansed. When we confess, we are forgiven. But what is the basis for that forgiveness? Is it not because Christ paid the penalty for our sins 2000 years ago? And although He finished that work, it’s APPLICATION is throughout all time, and in this case, when I confess my sin. Right?

Phil
[/quote]

How can I be confused? God is not an author of confusion. I was quoting what scripture is saying. :confused: God Bless


#18

[quote=thistle]I guess you must be a Protestant who thinks Christ died and we are saved no matter how often since then we commit sins. We must remain free from sin and do good works out of faith in hope for salvation.
[/quote]

:thumbsup: I,m with you on this one. Im not a believer of OSAS.God Bless


#19

Because you are not God.

Correct - God is not man that he should speak falsely

One can quote Scripture, and one can express what they believe Scripture to be saying, but it is impossible to “quote what Scripture is saying” You aren’t really quoting Scripture - you are paraphrasing it and expressing what you understand it to mean, which is not “authored” by God. Here take a look:

Again Christ asks us to offer up ourselves as living sacrifices.(romans 12;1) Christ does not need to offer sacrifices day after day. Christ sacrificed for our sins once for all when he offered Himself. (Hebrews 7;27)

Romans 12:1 isn’t really there and neither is Hebrews - its mostly your interpretations. That is where your confusion lies. Got it?

Phil


#20

[quote=SPOKENWORD]How can I be confused? God is not an author of confusion. I was quoting what scripture is saying. :confused: God Bless
[/quote]

Can’t help it…but so did Satan…quoting scriptures to Christ. :smiley:

God bless


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