How do clerics and Prelates adress each other?


#1

Through Mary, Queen of the Holy Papacy,

I'm writing a book which has alot of Cardinals and Priests and Bishops spekaing with each other yet, I do not know what is the most polite way in which they speak for each other. I want to know:

-how a Priests adresses a Priest,
-how a Bishop adresses a Bishop,
-how an ArchBishop/Primate, Patriarach/Pope/Priest, deacon adresses somebody with a rank lower than his,
-how the Pope adresses His Cardinals,

I don't know whether Bishops call other Bishops 'your excellency', seeing as they are of equal rank. I don't know whether Priests adress other Priests as Father George or Father Damian. I also want to know how a Bishop could possibly adress the Mother Superior of a convent. He definitely will not call her 'Vincenza' but somewhere similiar to Mother Vincenza.

This is not spam. And this is not asking somebody to write my book for me. I'm doing research and this information is a bit vital. Thanks.


#2

[quote="philipmarie, post:1, topic:218621"]
Through Mary, Queen of the Holy Papacy,

I'm writing a book which has alot of Cardinals and Priests and Bishops spekaing with each other yet, I do not know what is the most polite way in which they speak for each other. I want to know:

-how a Priests adresses a Priest,
-how a Bishop adresses a Bishop,
-how an ArchBishop/Primate, Patriarach/Pope/Priest, deacon adresses somebody with a rank lower than his,
-how the Pope adresses His Cardinals,

I don't know whether Bishops call other Bishops 'your excellency', seeing as they are of equal rank. I don't know whether Priests adress other Priests as Father George or Father Damian. I also want to know how a Bishop could possibly adress the Mother Superior of a convent. He definitely will not call her 'Vincenza' but somewhere similiar to Mother Vincenza.

This is not spam. And this is not asking somebody to write my book for me. I'm doing research and this information is a bit vital. Thanks.

[/quote]

I know that priests who have personal relationships with one another usually call each other by first names just like any friends would. However when they are talking to others about something they did with their friend they will generally add the title Father in front of it. Thats all I know for sure though.


#3

In the case of clergy addressing other clergy, if they are familiar with one another they will typically address one another simply by their first names, if they are of an equal rank. So two priests from the same diocese, in conversation, will typically call each other "Dave" and "John", or what have you. Same with two bishops or two cardinals or two monsignori, and so on, provided they are familiar with one another.

It's when clergy are not familiar with each other, or when they are addressing clergy of higher ranks than their own, that greater formality will come into play. Two priests meeting each other for the first time will probably address one another as "Father X" to begin with.

A priest addressing his bishop will usually call him "bishop" and not "excellency", although a priest might call a bishop who is not his own "excellency", particularly upon meeting him for the first time, or if the bishop is perceived to be of a culture in which greater formality is generally expected (for example, a bishop visiting from Rome). "Your Excellency" is seldom used conversationally anymore in the United States, however. Formally it is, when making an introduction or on an invitation or program, but not usually in simple conversation.

Now, a cardinal, due to the augustness of his rank, will almost always be addressed as "Your Eminence" by anyone beneath his rank. They aren't typically ever addressed in conversation as "cardinal" in the way that bishops are typically addressed as "bishop".

But these reflections pertain to the norm in the United States. As I say, in certain other cultures, greater formality is expected. It all depends upon the situation, the culture, and the level of familiarity between any two individual clergymen.


#4

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