How do you get copyright permission to quote Latin liturgical texts?


#1

Suppose I wanted to put the Order of Mass in Latin from the current Missale Romanum in my book, how would I get permission for it? I emailed the Libreria Editrice Vaticana but they responded in Italian (I tossed it into Google Translate, but it didn't seem to answer my question...)

I'm looking at some other books that quote the Latin and there's just a copyright acknowledgement in the front, though I don't know if they asked for permission for that. Any help? (And sorry if this is the wrong forum, I don't know who to contact...)

God bless!


#2

[quote="EphelDuath, post:1, topic:329008"]
Suppose I wanted to put the Order of Mass in Latin from the current Missale Romanum in my book, how would I get permission for it? I emailed the Libreria Editrice Vaticana but they responded in Italian (I tossed it into Google Translate, but it didn't seem to answer my question...)

I'm looking at some other books that quote the Latin and there's just a copyright acknowledgement in the front, though I don't know if they asked for permission for that. Any help? (And sorry if this is the wrong forum, I don't know who to contact...)

God bless!

[/quote]

I would think it falls under fair use, so long as you cite from where you got it.


#3

[quote="Cojuanco, post:2, topic:329008"]
I would think it falls under fair use, so long as you cite from where you got it.

[/quote]

I think that might depend on how much material is quoted.


#4

I know for English you contact ICEL (which I have done :)).

For Latin, I would have suggested contacting the Libreria Editrice Vaticana, but you've already done that. (I've done that before, too. :o)

If LEV didn't appear to answer your question the first time, I would try asking again, but in as concise and simple English as you possibly can to minimize any translation issues. Maybe they misunderstood what you were asking.


#5

[quote="Cojuanco, post:2, topic:329008"]
I would think it falls under fair use, so long as you cite from where you got it.

[/quote]

Probably not if you're planning to publish it.

Generally, though, your publisher takes care of getting the rights for you. They have a staff doing precisely this sort of thing. For example, a friend of mine published a book that included certain scripture passages. His publisher said that the translation he used charged a rather high licensing fee and suggested that he use a different translation that charged a lower fee. It was his choice, but ultimately it would make a difference in the royalties he received. Once he made his choice, the publisher took care of the licensing details and fees; the author didn't have anything to do with that aspect of the book.


#6

I highly doubt that text is copywritten and that might explain why you didn’t get a clear response.


#7

You don’t have to “do” anything for a work to be copyrighted. As the Copyright Clearance Center says, “The way in which copyright protection is secured is frequently misunderstood. Copyright is secured automatically when the work is created, and a work is “created” when it is fixed in a tangible form, such as the first time it is written or recorded. Neither publication, registration or other action in the Copyright Office is required to secure copyright, although registration is recommended.”


#8

[quote="SuscipeMeDomine, post:7, topic:329008"]
You don't have to "do" anything for a work to be copyrighted. As the Copyright Clearance Center says, "The way in which copyright protection is secured is frequently misunderstood. Copyright is secured automatically when the work is created, and a work is "created" when it is fixed in a tangible form, such as the first time it is written or recorded. Neither publication, registration or other action in the Copyright Office is required to secure copyright, although registration is recommended."

[/quote]

But copyrights expire after a certain amount of time and those texts become part of the public domain. Also, in order for it to effect other people, copyright has to be claimed by someone. If something is written anonymously, no one knows who created it and copywrite isn't claimed. Also, work can be created in which the creator purposely relinquishes copyrights so that others can use it for free.


#9

[quote="Allegra, post:8, topic:329008"]
But copyrights expire after a certain amount of time and those texts become part of the public domain. Also, in order for it to effect other people, copyright has to be claimed by someone. If something is written anonymously, no one knows who created it and copywrite isn't claimed. Also, work can be created in which the creator purposely relinquishes copyrights so that others can use it for free.

[/quote]

Life of the author plus 70 years or 95 years for corporate works.

And as I said above, no one has to actively claim copyright. It's there.

And yeah, there's a copyright even if it's difficult to know who owns it. This becomes an issue with publishing. In academia, for example, someone may be writing a dissertation. Because dissertations are published (most universities use ProQuest so ProQuest has to make sure the licenses are in place) they need permission to use copyrighted info. It becomes a HUGE problem if the copyright owner is hard to track down.

Again, if the OP is publishing a book, copyright is an issue and fair use doesn't apply the way it would if she/he was writing a paper for a class.

With something like Creative Commons the author still holds the copyright but gives permission for other people to use it without additional licensing or permission. The copyright is still there.


#10

If you don’t seem to have luck with LEV after a second attempt, I would try contacting ICEL or the USCCB. Even though I don’t think they’re the ones who would ultimately grant permission, since they speak English, they might be able to better explain what you need to do to get a positive response.


#11

I called the USCCB and they gave me the following. Contact Francesca Angeletti. She is a fluent English speaker. Her e-mail is angeletti@lev.va

Best,
Ed


#12

Way to be on the ball, Ed! :thumbsup:

There you go, Ephel.


#13

Thanks, Joe.

Ed


#14

There is usually the disclaimer that one can use it for free but not to alter it in any way.


#15

So glad to find this information here. Have you had any response from LEV?


#16

But there are frequently additional caveats that limit the number times the material can be used and require the user to notify the copyright holder about those uses.

One of the main reasons publishers of liturgical texts insist that others respect their copyrights is to preserve and guaranty the integrity of those texts.

(It’s not necessarily about money although that is sometimes an issue too.)


#17

If it's a part of Jubilate Deo, parishes may use it free of charge.

Pope Paul VI gave permission for the selections in Jubilate Deo to be freely reprinted. The booklet was accompanied by a letter in which the Holy Father made this request of the bishops:

“Would you therefore, in collaboration with the competent diocesan and national agencies for the liturgy, sacred music and catechetics, decide on the best ways of teaching the faithful the Latin chants of Jubilate Deo and of having them sing them…. You will thus be performing a new service for the Church in the domain of liturgical renewal” (Voluntati Obsequens).

Jubilate Deo contains simple chant settings in Latin of the parts of the Ordinary of the Mass: Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Memorial Acclamation, Agnus Dei. It also provides musical settings for the dialogues between priest and people, such as before the Preface, and the Ite Missa est, the response to the Prayer of the Faithful, and others.

An, expanded edition of Jubilate Deo was later issued by the Congregation for Divine Worship in 1987.

adoremus.org/JubilateDeo.html


#18

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.