How do you say this in Latin?

I hope that this thread can be used to get those that know and those that want to know together.

For myself I would like to know how one says “Faithful to the Pope”, in Latin.

I’m guessing:

Fidelis ad Papam

But I’m guessing. Paucam latinam cognosco (I know a bit of Latin) but I wouldn’t be able to hold a conversation with an ancient Roman. By far!

Pax vobiscum,
Filius Prodigus

“Fidus Papae” (singular, masculine) “Fidi Papae” (plural)
“Fida Papae” (ingular, feminine) “Fidae Papae” (plural)

(Correct me if I’m wrong, O fellow Latinists.)

(The adjective “fidus, -a” is taking the dative, here)

[quote=Aurelia]“Fidus Papae” (singular, masculine) “Fidi Papae” (plural)
“Fida Papae” (ingular, feminine) “Fidae Papae” (plural)

(Correct me if I’m wrong, O fellow Latinists.)
[/quote]

This is what I would have submitted, if you hadn’t already.

(Have you noticed, if you follow the continental pronunciation, that “Fidus Papae” sort of sounds like “Feed us Popeye”? :p)

(Have you noticed, if you follow the continental pronunciation, that “Fidus Papae” sort of sounds like “Feed us Popeye”? :p)

Yeah, but instead of spinach we get the Bread of Life…:smiley:

-ACEGC

I would render it Papae fidelis, just because I prefer that adjective over fidus.

de gustibus non est disputandum, :twocents:
tee

In case we have a female Pope . . . :ehh:

[quote=JGheen]In case we have a female Pope . . . :ehh:
[/quote]

*Fida, fidae * is feminine.

*Papa, papae, *though a 1st declension noun, is masculine (just like *poeta, poetae *(poet) or *agricola, agricolae *(farmer)).

tee

Faithful is an adjective. In Latin, the adjective takes the ending based off of the gender of the noun or pronoun it describes.

Secondly, in this case you are not saying “to the faithul Pope” which would be “Papae fidelo.” You are saying “I am faithful to the Pope.”

fidelus ad Papam (if you are male)
fidela ad Papam (if you are female)

One other thing.

“Papae fidelo” is using the Pope as the indirect object of the sentence.
“ad Papam fidelum” is the prepositional phrase “to the faithful Pope.”

[quote=bogeyjlg]One other thing.

“Papae fidelo” is using the Pope as the indirect object of the sentence.

[/quote]

*Papae fidelo *certainly could be the indirect object if there were a sentence around it. But “dative” is not always identical with “indirect object”.

Papae fidelis *does indeed (among others) mean “faithful to the pope”. It is an example of the dative with certain adjectives**, as [post=1147939]**Aurelia **indicated above[/post].

(* NB: *Fidelis *works as either masculine or feminine singular. :wink: )

(** If you really want to put *papa *into the accusative for this fragment, you probably want to use *in *or *erga *rather than *ad *as indicated in the section following eg: *fidelis in papam *)

tee

Fidelis papae is correct. Fidelis is the adjective meaning faithful, it is nominative. Papam is dative of reference. You are faithful with reference to the pope.

How do you say “Peace be with you.” in Latin?

[quote=coyote]How do you say “Peace be with you.” in Latin?
[/quote]

pax vobiscum

as my wisecracking dad would say…
you say “Faithful to the Pope”…in Latin."

get it? get it?

For those with an irrepressible urge to croon the Elvis Presley ballad “Love Me Tender,” in Latin, here it is. (Not being a Latinist, I cannot vouch for its accuracy, but it sounds pretty good when sung to the tune.)

Love Me Tender (Tenere me ama)

(1) Tenere me, suaviter
Ama intime.
Me beasti dulciter,
Et nunc amo te.
(Refrain)
Tenere me adama,
Vero somnio;
Amo te, O lux mea:
Fiat unio.

(2) Tenere me longius
Corde fer tuo.
Illic sum haud impius,
Numquam abeo.

(Tenere me adama, . . . )

(3) Tenere me ama, dic
Meam esse te.
Tuus sum per saeculum,
In perpetuum.

(Tenere me adama, . . . )

pax vobiscum
[/quote]

Unless only one person is being addressed, then it is:

pax tecum

tee

[quote=JimG]For those with an irrepressible urge to croon the Elvis Presley ballad “Love Me Tender,” in Latin, here it is. (Not being a Latinist, I cannot vouch for its accuracy, but it sounds pretty good when sung to the tune.)

Love Me Tender (Tenere me ama)

(1) Tenere me, suaviter
Ama intime.
Me beasti dulciter,
Et nunc amo te.
(Refrain)
Tenere me adama,
Vero somnio;
Amo te, O lux mea:
Fiat unio.

(2) Tenere me longius
Corde fer tuo.
Illic sum haud impius,
Numquam abeo.

(Tenere me adama, . . . )

(3) Tenere me ama, dic
Meam esse te.
Tuus sum per saeculum,
In perpetuum.

(Tenere me adama, . . . )
[/quote]

As *ille rex *(the king) would say:

Gratias tibi; Gratias tibi plurimas ago.
Thank you; Thank you very much.

tee

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