How do you Worship God?


#1

Jewish people worship God on bended knee
Muslims do also. And Catholics get on their knees and worship God as one body. I have never been in a Protestant church. Do you get on your knees together and worship God? All I have seen are the ones on tv and the people all sit and listen to a person talking. I rarely see them with a bible. Is this how they Worship?

If sitting is a sign of learning and standing is a sign of praying, and kneeling is also a sign of prayer and humility before God. I was just wondering as far as Protestants go, how do they worship?

As a Catholic, Mass is a time for Worshipping God. It is the highest form of prayer. We take the time to learn at classes, but on Sunday we pray as one body at Mass.


#2

It varies with denomination. Episcopalians and Lutherans stand, sit and kneel at various points during the service. Presbyterians, Baptists and Methodists generally sit or stand, in my experience. For some churches, it will be done in quiet reverence, in some much more actively and emotionally (depending on the individual church more than the denomination, I believe). Services always include corporate prayer, usually multiple ones.

Every Protestant church I have been in has had a copy of the Bible in the pew alongside the hymnal or prayerbook, and a great many Protestants bring their own Bibles to service each week. The ones I have been in usually followed the format of Sunday school in the morning (which was an hour of study together in classes separated by age/interest) then the hour of worship. Many also had Sunday night services, which may include additional study time as well as a worship service, and Wednesday night study. Additionally there may be study or service groups that meet at various times during the week, but are subsets of the congregation.

Actually I have never seen anyone kneel in the (many) Reform Jewish services I have attended. Sit and stand, yes, but there is no provision for kneeling (no space or kneeling benches in the sanctuary). Likewise there is no provision for kneeling as a group in the Conservative Jewish temple here, so I am not sure how accurate your belief that Jews worship on bended knee is for Judaism as a whole–might be limited to a specific part? I have never been to an Orthodox service or into an Orthodox temple, so I don’t have an experience on which to base a comparison. The Reform temple also has a copy of the Tanakh alongside the prayerbook in the pews.


#3

The only way to worship God is to worship Him in the way that He Himself has commanded His creations to worship Him.

The creations should never change or invent new ways to worship their Creator and then hope that He will accept their prayers or any other form of worship for that matter… I just cannot believe that it works that way.

The creations therefore need to religiously follow the form and manner how the Prophets (pbut) themselves worshiped their Creator in both their movements during and also the ablution that they performed before their prayers.

In a book entitled, “To Pray as a Jew”, a lengthy explanation is given of the Prayers as done by the ancient Jews and a few of the contemporary Jews. In this book the author put diagrams showing the movement and positions during the prayer and one quickly realizes the similarity of the prayers of the Jews then and the Salat as practiced by the Muslims.

http://www.submission.org/jews-1.jpghttp://www.submission.org/jews-2.jpg

In his comment about these positions the author wrote : “In most contemporary congregations very few people keep to the tradition of falling prostrate. Sometimes it is only the Prayer leader and the rabbi who does so. In more traditional congregations, however, some worshipers, men and women, will join the Prayer Leader and rabbi in the act of prostrating themselves. In Israeli synagogues, the practice is more widespread than in synagogues elsewhere. Since this is a position that we are unaccustomed to, one who has never done this before might very well demur. But once accomplished, the experience provides such a spiritual uplift that one looks forward to repeating it. Those willing to try this ancient ritual form on the rare occasions that call for it might welcome the following diagrams of the correct procedure”

It is also interesting to learn from this book that the prayers of the Jews involve wash before the prayers, (like Wuduu or ablution for Muslims), and the call for Prayers (like the Azan for the Muslims).


#4

Just sitting for over an hour, with a prayer at the very beginning, and at the end. Three or four hymns, and some talks. A passing of the sacrament(Bread and water). A lack of a depth of worship it seems, but the music at times can be uplifting, and there are times when the talks can be very spiritual, at other times the talks maybe dry, and the speakers are nervous. No cross in front, and no kneelers. This is LDS(mormon).


#5

** In this book the author put diagrams showing the movement and positions during the prayer and one quickly realizes the similarity of the prayers of the Jews then and the Salat as practiced by the Muslims.**

Interesting, it is also very similar to the Sun Salutation (surya namaskar) in yoga.
yogasite.com/sunsalute.htm

Agreed that it is not universal—after 10 years of association with the local Reform Jewish temple (my husband sang in the choir there), I have never seen or heard of this done here.

It is also interesting to learn from this book that the prayers of the Jews involve wash before the prayers, (like Wuduu or ablution for Muslims), and the call for Prayers (like the Azan for the Muslims).

Washing is not part of the ritual in the temples that I have visited–ie if it is done, it must be being done privately in the bathroom before the service. There is no provision for it in the construction of the temple or in the service itself. Now this may be different in different forms of Judaism.


#6

In the yoga website that you cited, I do not see any form of prostration which is similar to how the Prophets (pbut) prayed i.e. falling on their faces when prostrating to their Creator.

Jesus (pbuh) is described in the Gospels as prostrating during prayer. In Matthew 26:39, the author describes an incident which took place when Jesus went with his disciples to Gethsemane: “And going a little farther he fell on his face and prayed, ‘My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as thou wilt.”

Christians today kneel down, clasping their hands, in a posture which cannot be ascribed to Jesus. The method of prostration in prayer followed by Jesus was not of his own making. It was the mode of prayer of the prophets before him. In the Old Testament, Genesis 17:3, Prophet Abraham is recorded to have fallen on his face in prayer; in Numbers 16:22 & 20:6, both Moses and Aaron are recorded to have fallen on their faces in worship; in Joshua 5:14 & 7:6, Joshua fell on his face to the earth and worshipped; in I Kings 18:42, Elijah bowed down on the ground and put his face between his knees. This was the way of the prophets through whom God chose to convey His word to the world; and it is only by this way that those who claim to follow Jesus will gain the salvation which he preached in his Gospel.

And making ablution before prayer is an act of worship that God Himself commanded Moses (pbuh) to do.

Prior to making formal prayer, Jesus used to wash his limbs according to the teachings of the Torah. Moses and Aaron are recorded as doing the same in Exodus 40:30-31, **“30 And he set the laver between the tent of meeting and the altar, and put water in it for washing, 31with which Moses and Aaron and his sons washed their hands and their feet… as the Lord commanded Moses.” **


#7

We gather in the Meeting House at the specified time, we “center down for worship”. Each of us seeking the Light Within and join to the Living Silence. Out of that Silence we receive ministry from one another as the Spirit leads. We share the Living Presence as Christ becomes “truly present” among us and seek His Instruction through the Silence or through the ministry He would give from those moved to break the Silence either throguh vocal ministry, song, prayer or scripture reading. We have “Communion after the manner of Friends.”

We sit with heads bowed, hand foled on our laps or knees, feet flat on the floor. At the time the Clerk of the Meeting or one of the “elders” chosen to Close Meeting, he turns to the person next to him and shakes his hand usually an hour or so after the first head is bowed…the Meeting turns to the ones sitting next to them and shake hands, everyone then moves about shaking hands and offering greeting. Then the business protion of Meeting begins.

A friend of mine from another Christian church attended a Meeting for Worship with me a few years ago…we were about 15 minutes into Worship when he leaned to me and asked…“When do we start?”…I smiled and said…“About 15 minutes ago.” It then dawned on him why we were all sitting with heads bowed or reading the Bible…no one had yet been moved to offer vocal ministry.


#8

All I have seen are the ones on tv and the people all sit and listen to a person talking. I rarely see them with a bible. Is this how they Worship?

Television is a vast sea of lies and is only misleading … :slight_smile: Protestant churches will (ideally) teach FROM the Scriptures, and are quick to proclaim the sufficiency of the Word. The idea is to build up the believers, help them to understand the Scriptures, and equip them to do every good work.

Do you get on your knees together and worship God?

I have. I know others who have. I must say, honestly, it’s much different, too, than it is in Mass. At least for me … You see, when one drops to his/her knees in a Protestant service, it is not necessary, not a regular motion, it is entirely spontaneous. It is pure worship. I’ve known in our church’s camp in up in Kentucky (I was baptized May 3rd, 2006, and had just therefore surrendered my life to Christ when I saw all this that following summer) kids, including myself, who’ve knelt, cried, embraced, prostrated themselves, rushed the altar and cried out … Mind you, this was not in the spirit of good music. There was none. A cross, a pathetic, rugged wooden cross, nailed together, had been set up. Each of us wrote down our personal sin on a scrap of paper and attached them to the cross. We knelt, sang, cried, embraced, for hours before that thing. The papers were taken sometime that morning (we were there very late) and were burned on a stone altar, reminding us of freedom from sin. Still in our Sunday night service it is not odd for some to remain seated or kneel during the singing part of worship, to confess, to pray for whatever it is they pray for …

So perhaps not all will ever know the joys of true humiliation in prayer, but, yes, for myself, for many of my brothers and sisters, we have experienced it …


#9

In our church kneeling is all up to individual, especially during Praise and Worshipping time (everyone can knee all the way for at least 30-45min if they wanted to) However usually most pple will kneel during their QT, around 30min or so since most pple have their OT for at least an hour or more.


#10

Some times I get on my knees but mostly I sit in my favourite armchair or sit on my bed :slight_smile:


#11

In the book of Ephesians

2:21 In him the whole building is joined together and rises to become a holy temple in the Lord.

3:14For this reason I kneel before the Father

4:4There is one body and one Spirit—just as you were called to one hope when you were called—

4:16From him the whole body, joined and held together by every supporting ligament, grows and builds itself up in love, as each part does its work.

5:30 for we are members of his body.

**Romans 12:5 **
so in Christ we who are many form one body, and each member belongs to all the others.

**1 Corinthians 10:17 **
Because there is one loaf, we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf.

**Corinthians 12:12 **
The body is a unit, though it is made up of many parts; and though all its parts are many, they form one body. So it is with Christ.

[size=]
[size=]So at Mass I see us as one body moving,kneeling,praying,singing and worshipping God in unison.[/size][/size]


#12

fellow Christian posted:

So at Mass I see us as one body moving,kneeling,praying,singing and worshipping God*

Very true fellow Christian and not just in the present but one body in union with the Saints in Heaven and those yet to be born. :slight_smile:


#13

Hi
I think all Christians whatever the denomination must pray as JesusYeshuaIssa used to pray, that would also bring unity in the Christendom.
Muslim prayer includes modes of prayers in usage in different or most of the people the world over, it is a Universal Religion. Peace.
I am an Ahmadi – a peaceful faith in Islam bridging gaps between faiths/denominations/religions/agnostics
The West, as I understand, due to certain disinformation has seen only MullahIslam or MullahShariah; the true face of Muhammad’sIslam and PromisedMessiahImamMahdi’sIslam is yet hidden from their eyes, which is truly speaking only peaceful.


#14

Your missing the point here paarsurrey. Thats quite odd you say the position of prayer will bring unity I do not see this with Ilsam as you claim.


#15

With my whole heart in Spirit and in truth


#16

Acts 20:
34 You yourselves know: for such things as were needful for me and them that are with me, these hands have furnished. 35 I have shewed you all things, how that so labouring you ought to support the weak, and to remember the word of the Lord Jesus, how he said: It is a more blessed thing to give, rather than to receive.

36 And when he had said these things, kneeling down, he prayed with them all. 37 And there was much weeping among them all; and falling on the neck of Paul, they kissed him, 38 Being grieved most of all for the word which he had said, that they should see his face no more. And they brought him on his way to the ship. www.drbo.org


#17

The Bible passage that you have cited is of Paul’s Address to the Ephesian Elders and therefore it is describing the manner of praying that Paul practiced, not how Jesus (pbuh) prayed.


#18

But as you can see the earliest of Christians were praying like this. That is enough. The converts would have prayed like St. Paul and the apostles prayed. And they, particularly the apostles, you would think after being together with Jesus for three years would have learnt from Jesus how to pray such as the Lord’s Prayer.


#19

Hi
I think all Christians whatever the denomination must pray as JesusYeshuaIssa used to pray, that would also bring unity in the Christendom.
Muslim prayer includes modes of prayers in usage in different or most of the people the world over, it is a Universal Religion. Peace.
I am an Ahmadi – a peaceful faith in Islam bridging gaps between faiths/denominations/religions/agnostics
The West, as I understand, due to certain disinformation has seen only MullahIslam or MullahShariah; the true face of Muhammad’sIslam and PromisedMessiahImamMahdi’sIslam is yet hidden from their eyes, which is truly speaking only peaceful.


#20

dear friend,
what is Ahmadi?
how did Jesus pray?
thank you.
governorperez


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