How does a Protestant repent after Baptism and after being "saved"?


#1

Matthew Chapter 11 - "Woe to you, Chora’zin! woe to you, Beth-sa’ida! for if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have** repent**ed long ago in sackcloth and ashes.

This is just one example of showing repentance. As a Catholic, the sacrament of reconciliation is one way of repenting. Because of preparing for going to confession with an examination of conscience, it also helps with the internal change needed for repentance.

I just wonder how a Protestant repents if he is already baptized and saved. Would a Protestant like to comment? If so, please tell me if you method of repenting helps you stay on the narrow path or do you fall into the same sin easily even after repentance?

I’d prefer to avoid the argument about mediators and there being no need to confess to a priest, but instead, please tell me how a Protestant repents. Is it all internally, quietly telling God you are sorry for your sins or is there anything physically that you do to at least symbolize your change of heart or repentance?


#2

Matthew Chapter 11 - "Woe to you, Chora’zin! woe to you, Beth-sa’ida! for if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have** repent**ed long ago in sackcloth and ashes.

This is just one example of showing repentance. As a Catholic, the sacrament of reconciliation is one way of repenting. Because of preparing for going to confession with an examination of conscience, it also helps with the internal change needed for repentance.

I just wonder how a Protestant repents if he is already baptized and saved. Would a Protestant like to comment? If so, please tell me if you method of repenting helps you stay on the narrow path or do you fall into the same sin easily even after repentance?

I was born into a protestant family and have spanned the various denominations from the quite liberal to the ultra-fundamentalist. What I was always told and practiced is that repentance is the inward act towards God of turning away from sin and choosing to sin no more.

This in combination with truly apologizing from the heart is what I have always considered repentance. The act is all conducted internally without need of confession simply calling on Christ’s sacrifice for redemption.

With regards to staying on the path, being forgiven is a help but the moment by moment walk in the Lord is a better method for staying on course.

I’d prefer to avoid the argument about mediators and there being no need to confess to a priest, but instead, please tell me how a Protestant repents. Is it all internally, quietly telling God you are sorry for your sins or is there anything physically that you do to at least symbolize your change of heart or repentance?

I am curious about confession at this point and am leaning towards the Catholic faith. I have literally spent the better part of my Christian life under the assumption that the Catholic faith is incorrect in its teachings. I have also openly slammed the Catholic Church a thousand times.

I recently visited a chapel of adoration and I had a massive revelation in regards to God’s ‘literal’ presence in the Eucharist. I have felt the Lord on every occasion I have been exposed to Christ in the Eucharist and will certainly trust that confession is right after what I have been shown by God in the Catholic Church.

I must say that I have experienced Christ without being Catholic. The thing I find amazing in the Catholic Church is that you don’t need to merely search internally for Christ through meditation and prayer. You can simply go to him at any time and he is there without a doubt.

I feel that protestants myself included (until recently) are missing out on a great gift and resource from the lord by not understanding his literal presence in the Eucharist. It’s like going to the to an atomic reactor to fuel up in stead of running on spiritual fumes.

(sorry for going off topic)

-D


#3

I have felt the Lord on every occasion I have been exposed to Christ in the Eucharist and will certainly trust that confession is right after what I have been shown by God in the Catholic Church.

From this quote you have just about hit the nail on the head when trying to explain to a non Catholic about the Eucharist! For me this has been the most challenging part of trying to explain the REAL presence of Christ in the Eucharist!

Also I too experience Christ in the Eucharist everytime I attend Mass! Its amazing! I always go home feeling happy and at peace! So ppl do need to attend mass to be refueled in their Faith and to learn and hear the Word of GOd each week and everyday if ppl can go everyday! So once again you are right about the Eucharist!

sorry to go off topic here but Darrell has just blown me out of the water with what he/she has said!

Back to the topic, from what I"ve heard and from what Non Caths proclaim in Yahoo Chat is that you only pray to God by yourself! I find this a very lonely way but hey, And if you need further help this one person was telling me that you should go to a Shrink cos it’s just the same as going to a Priest! But he/she seemed to missed the point of graces and absolution etc!


#4

I haven’t been here too many times, but it seems like there is as much overgeneralization and misinformation about Protestants as there is overgeneralization and misinformation about Catholics.

Where repentance, forgiveness of sins, Real Presence, and other aspects of the faith are concerned, you’re going to get different answers depending on which “line” of the Protestant faith you are talking about. Are you talking about the Lutheran line, the Calvinist line, the Anabaptist line, or the Anglican line?

I’m of the Anglican line (United Methodist), and repentance is part of individual and corporate piety, as we sin as individuals and as a church/society. Baptism addresses original sin and is the initiation into the faith (we baptize infants, btw), but baptism is only the beginning - not the end.

Some make repentance part of their daily prayer. I pray the daily office, which includes confession and repentance. Confession and repentance is also a part of the corporate worship service each week. My tradition also embraces Real Presence; during eucharistic celebrations, however, many prefer to kneel while receiving the sacrament, and remain kneeling afterwards in a time of penitence, reflection, and prayer, to examine themselves, to give thanks to God for His sacrifice, and to prepare their hearts to go into the world in Christian service.

My tradition sees baptism much like the Catholic/E.O. Church. Not all Protestants understand baptism that way - many Protestant traditions do not even see baptism as a sacrament. So you may have to narrow the focus of your question.

O+


#5

Have you read the Catechism of the Catholic Church? I think this website has a link to it and I know www.salvationhistory.com does. I can almost promise you that what you’ve heard of the Catholic Church is wrong or at least very twisted. Don’t trust me though. Get the Catechism and find your nearest RCIA group (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) by calling the Catholic Church nearest your house. After what you’ve experienced in adoration, you will so much love the Catholic Church. As with all denominatioins, the people are sinners and will do wrong, but The Church and her teachings are so wonderful that I can’t imagine you not falling in love with the Catholic faith and it provides all that you need for a continuing growth in your personal relationship with our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Why do Catholics Geneflect is also a short book that deals with common misunderstanding of the Catholic Church? I will pray for you to continue to follow God’s will on your journey, hopefully into the Catholic Church.


#6

[quote=O.S. Luke]I haven’t been here too many times, but it seems like there is as much overgeneralization and misinformation about Protestants as there is overgeneralization and misinformation about Catholics.

Where repentance, forgiveness of sins, Real Presence, and other aspects of the faith are concerned, you’re going to get different answers depending on which “line” of the Protestant faith you are talking about. Are you talking about the Lutheran line, the Calvinist line, the Anabaptist line, or the Anglican line?

I’m of the Anglican line (United Methodist), and repentance is part of individual and corporate piety, as we sin as individuals and as a church/society. Baptism addresses original sin and is the initiation into the faith (we baptize infants, btw), but baptism is only the beginning - not the end.

Some make repentance part of their daily prayer. I pray the daily office, which includes confession and repentance. Confession and repentance is also a part of the corporate worship service each week. My tradition also embraces Real Presence; during eucharistic celebrations, however, many prefer to kneel while receiving the sacrament, and remain kneeling afterwards in a time of penitence, reflection, and prayer, to examine themselves, to give thanks to God for His sacrifice, and to prepare their hearts to go into the world in Christian service.

My tradition sees baptism much like the Catholic/E.O. Church. Not all Protestants understand baptism that way - many Protestant traditions do not even see baptism as a sacrament. So you may have to narrow the focus of your question.

O+
[/quote]

Thank you for your detail. I think I will leave it general in the hopes that I will learn about different denominations. I hope the responders will mention their denomination.


#7

A non catholic repents the same way a catholic does,the difference being we have a direct line and not an operator,thus the conversation is not interrupted. :wink:


#8

[quote=WhatIf]Have you read the Catechism of the Catholic Church? I think this website has a link to it and I know www.salvationhistory.com does. I can almost promise you that what you’ve heard of the Catholic Church is wrong or at least very twisted. Don’t trust me though. Get the Catechism and find your nearest RCIA group (Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) by calling the Catholic Church nearest your house. After what you’ve experienced in adoration, you will so much love the Catholic Church. As with all denominatioins, the people are sinners and will do wrong, but The Church and her teachings are so wonderful that I can’t imagine you not falling in love with the Catholic faith and it provides all that you need for a continuing growth in your personal relationship with our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Why do Catholics Geneflect is also a short book that deals with common misunderstanding of the Catholic Church? I will pray for you to continue to follow God’s will on your journey, hopefully into the Catholic Church.
[/quote]

Thank you for the information and prayers.

-D


#9

[quote=SPOKENWORD]A non catholic repents the same way a catholic does,the difference being we have a direct line and not an operator,thus the conversation is not interrupted. :wink:
[/quote]

If I had a dollar for every time I have said the above quote I could retire. I realize that the prospect of actual spiritual presence in an object is a tough pill to swallow for a protestant.

The Eucharist is the most direct line there is in my experience. It is virtual Christ presence and not symbolism in the slightest. I simply went in and prayed in a manor that was more listening to the spirit then speaking and I walked out with a sun tan saying to myself “I can’t believe that just happened”.

The system that God has set in place in the Catholic Church makes perfect sense to me now. I have lost nothing in regards to my ability to pray to God without a building or an object. The church provides a gift from God in regards to additional resources that is a full spiritual program.

When I went to Church in the past it was a place for fellowship and prayer. Now when I go to Church it feels more like a spiritual source in the most literal sense.

God can put himself anyplace he chooses, he has chosen to place himself in the Eucharist for his children to come and be filled. I would not believe any of this in a million years if it were not shown to me in an overwhelming and doubtless manor from the Lord.

-D


#10

[quote=SPOKENWORD]A non catholic repents the same way a catholic does,the difference being we have a direct line and not an operator,thus the conversation is not interrupted. :wink:
[/quote]

You are mistaken. We do have a direct line of conversation/communication as a Protestant does. Just because we have confession with a Priest, does not been we are not directly communicating to Jesus Christ. You misunderstand Catholic confession and repentance. We have many ways that we pray and ask for forgiveness and repent. Having a priest present is just one.

Protestants on the other hand seem to be left on their own with very little support or encouragement from their Church to be penitent. I don’t know though. I’ve never been Protestant which is why I wanted to hear from Protestants. I just wanted to clear things up if you think we think we need an “operator” or that we even use an “operator”. We don’t. Confession is often misunderstood.


#11

[quote=Darrel]If I had a dollar for every time I have said the above quote I could retire. I realize that the prospect of actual spiritual presence in an object is a tough pill to swallow for a protestant.

The Eucharist is the most direct line there is in my experience. It is virtual Christ presence and not symbolism in the slightest. I simply went in and prayed in a manor that was more listening to the spirit then speaking and I walked out with a sun tan saying to myself “I can’t believe that just happened”.

The system that God has set in place in the Catholic Church makes perfect sense to me now. I have lost nothing in regards to my ability to pray to God without a building or an object. The church provides a gift from God in regards to additional resources that is a full spiritual program.

When I went to Church in the past it was a place for fellowship and prayer. Now when I go to Church it feels more like a spiritual source in the most literal sense.

God can put himself anyplace he chooses, he has chosen to place himself in the Eucharist for his children to come and be filled. I would not believe any of this in a million years if it were not shown to me in an overwhelming and doubtless manor from the Lord.

-D
[/quote]

Very well said. I agree.


#12

[quote=SPOKENWORD]A non catholic repents the same way a catholic does,the difference being we have a direct line and not an operator,thus the conversation is not interrupted. :wink:
[/quote]

Then you miss out on the counselling that comes with the operator. It is so much better to be able to talk things over and there are huge benefits. For one thing there are many people who have a guilty conscience and end up spending a lot of money on visiting a therapist when a moment of quiet reflection, confession of sin and being absolved for that sin brings peace of soul.

MaggieOH


#13

[quote=WhatIf]You are mistaken. We do have a direct line of conversation/communication as a Protestant does. Just because we have confession with a Priest, does not been we are not directly communicating to Jesus Christ. You misunderstand Catholic confession and repentance. We have many ways that we pray and ask for forgiveness and repent. Having a priest present is just one.

Protestants on the other hand seem to be left on their own with very little support or encouragement from their Church to be penitent. I don’t know though. I’ve never been Protestant which is why I wanted to hear from Protestants. I just wanted to clear things up if you think we think we need an “operator” or that we even use an “operator”. We don’t. Confession is often misunderstood.
[/quote]

Which is more direct? Through Man or through God? :confused:


#14

[quote=Darrel]If I had a dollar for every time I have said the above quote I could retire. I realize that the prospect of actual spiritual presence in an object is a tough pill to swallow for a protestant.

The Eucharist is the most direct line there is in my experience. It is virtual Christ presence and not symbolism in the slightest. I simply went in and prayed in a manor that was more listening to the spirit then speaking and I walked out with a sun tan saying to myself “I can’t believe that just happened”.

The system that God has set in place in the Catholic Church makes perfect sense to me now. I have lost nothing in regards to my ability to pray to God without a building or an object. The church provides a gift from God in regards to additional resources that is a full spiritual program.

When I went to Church in the past it was a place for fellowship and prayer. Now when I go to Church it feels more like a spiritual source in the most literal sense.

God can put himself anyplace he chooses, he has chosen to place himself in the Eucharist for his children to come and be filled. I would not believe any of this in a million years if it were not shown to me in an overwhelming and doubtless manor from the Lord.

-D
[/quote]

I doubt that this was your intent but you should really repent before you take the Eucharist.


#15

[quote=MaggieOH]Then you miss out on the counselling that comes with the operator. It is so much better to be able to talk things over and there are huge benefits. For one thing there are many people who have a guilty conscience and end up spending a lot of money on visiting a therapist when a moment of quiet reflection, confession of sin and being absolved for that sin brings peace of soul.

MaggieOH
[/quote]

Hi Maggie,BUT I thought Jesus is our wonderful counsellor. :confused: God Bless


#16

#17

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Which is more direct? Through Man or through God? :confused:
[/quote]

Um…did you actually read the post…?

You are mistaken. We do have a direct line of conversation/communication as a Protestant does. Just because we have confession with a Priest, does not been we are not directly communicating to Jesus Christ. You misunderstand Catholic confession and repentance. We have many ways that we pray and ask for forgiveness and repent. Having a priest present is just one.

We pray privately, we pray with a priest, directly to Jesus (and God and the Holy Spirit), for intercession from other members of the Body of Christ (on earth or in heaven)…

God Bless,

Robert.


#18

#19

[quote=rlg94086]Um…did you actually read the post…?

We pray privately, we pray with a priest, directly to Jesus (and God and the Holy Spirit), for intercession from other members of the Body of Christ (on earth or in heaven)…

God Bless,

Robert.
[/quote]

Are you praying WITH or are you praying TO a priest[man] or both? :confused: .


#20

[quote=WhatIf]You are mistaken. We do have a direct line of conversation/communication as a Protestant does. Just because we have confession with a Priest, does not been we are not directly communicating to Jesus Christ. You misunderstand Catholic confession and repentance. We have many ways that we pray and ask for forgiveness and repent. Having a priest present is just one.

Protestants on the other hand seem to be left on their own with very little support or encouragement from their Church to be penitent. I don’t know though. I’ve never been Protestant which is why I wanted to hear from Protestants. I just wanted to clear things up if you think we think we need an “operator” or that we even use an “operator”. We don’t. Confession is often misunderstood.
[/quote]

I am most certainly not left on my own as a Protestant seeking to confess my sin and turn away from it. I have an entire congregation to pray with me and provide accountability in my struggle against sin. I can ask any Christian to pray for me, as well.

Certain sins provide their own penance, as we suffer the earthly consequences of them.


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