How far does participating in sin go?

So I have a question about participating in sins. I know that there are nine ways: counsel, command, consent, provocation, praise, concealment, partaking, silence, and defense, but I have a question about counsel, consent and provocation.
For provocation: does offering a person something which may cause sin (e.g. offering cake to someone who is overweight), count as provocation or counsel, since it is an opportunity if misused, or does it not, since whether or not something like that is sinful depends on how the other person uses it.

For consent: does implicit consent count? If I know someone is doing something wrong, but also that I can’t dissuade them, does not pointing it out or arguing against it count as consent?

Here the Catechism can make things clearer:

1868 Sin is a personal act. Moreover, we have a responsibility for the sins committed by others when we cooperate in them:

  • by participating directly and voluntarily in them;

  • by ordering, advising, praising, or approving them;

  • by not disclosing or not hindering them when we have an obligation to do so;

  • by protecting evil-doers.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s1c1a8.htm#V

Now does offering a piece of cake to a person who is overweight a sin? No I would not normally say that - one does not know their health. Persons who are overweight are permitted to eat cake too :slight_smile:

Some examples:

  • by participating directly and voluntarily in them; --(knowingly and willingly buying a person intending to get drunk a case of alcohol)

  • by ordering, advising, praising, or approving them; (saying to a couple attempting a invalid wedding - I am so glad your getting married -or to saying to a person who is planning to steel from his work - that is a great idea - or suggesting ways to to it!)

  • by not disclosing or not hindering them when we have an obligation to do so; (a parent who has a kid who is engaging in gravely wrong actions - or a brother who knows his brother is doing such and knows he is to tell his parents and does not)

  • by protecting evil-doers. (hiding the highway sniper in ones house…)

By “consent” in your question is meant “willing that the sinful thing happen” - in terms of another person doing the action. I want him to get drunk.

Can implicit consent happen? Yes. See above.

But* simply *not arguing against something or not saying something - may not involve any consent …any sin. Sometimes one must prudently judge not to say something (while of course avoiding approving of the sin or appearing to do so). For one know it will not do anything but only make matters worse.

Do I have to say something to everyone who is objectively sinning? no.

Should I say something say to a friend who wants to get an abortion? Yes most certainly!

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.