How Long Should We Pray For Pour Souls?


#1

Since this is the month of All Souls, I have been praying for the souls of my loved ones and have been strugglign with some things. I was wondering, how long should we pray for our loved ones who have died? Is it pointless for example to pray for my great-grandfather who died 70 years ago? The entire span of his life was 70 years–could it really be possible that he could STILL be in Purgatory? And I have been struggling with something else too–since they’re no longer on this earth, does time even apply to them? It seems like they would exist outside time and space. Do the prayers lessen their “time” in Purgatory? Or do they lessen their pain temporarily? What do the prayers do for them?


#2

[quote=PiusXIII]Since this is the month of All Souls, I have been praying for the souls of my loved ones and have been strugglign with some things. I was wondering, how long should we pray for our loved ones who have died? Is it pointless for example to pray for my great-grandfather who died 70 years ago? The entire span of his life was 70 years–could it really be possible that he could STILL be in Purgatory? And I have been struggling with something else too–since they’re no longer on this earth, does time even apply to them? It seems like they would exist outside time and space. Do the prayers lessen their “time” in Purgatory? Or do they lessen their pain temporarily? What do the prayers do for them?
[/quote]

Because we can’t know, aside from those the Church has beatified or canonized, who is already in Heaven, who is in Purgatory for a time, or who is damned, **we pray for the dead for the rest of our lives – assuming they are in Purgatory, while hoping they are in Heaven and not damned. **

That some souls stay long in Purgatory is implied by the fact that the Church puts no limit to the offering of Masses for the dead; some foundtions have been going on for centuries, offered for the repose of certain souls. St. Augustine believes that those stay longest in purgatory who have loved the goods of earth more. Some saints have held that certain holy souls in purgatory suffer no pain except their exclusion from the vision of God. Practiallly all are agreed that in purgatory the souls suffer most in those things in which they sinned most; as the “Imitation of Christ” says: “In what things a man hath most sinned, in those things shall he be most grievously tormented.”

The poor souls, however, have much to console them. They are certain of salvation and the love of God. They are free from temptation; they cannot commit the slightest sin, even of impatience.

They have no worry, anxiety, or distress of mind, for they are sure of deliverance. They are comforted by the prayers of the angels and saints, and of the people on earth.

All the souls in Purgatory will go to Heaven some day; they will stay in Purgatory only as long as they have not atoned for all their sins.


#3

Until we are one. :wink:


#4

Say–I just noticed I wrote “Pour Souls” instead of “Poor Souls.” You know what I mean—but sorry for the spelling error.

Stupid me.


#5

If you pray for someone who has already been released from Purgatory then the merits of your prayers are applied to some other soul. Time does not exist in Purgatory; it is a state of being. I can’t remember where I read that and didn’t see it in the Catechism, but I also looked very quickly.


#6

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