How many quotes should I limet myself to


#1

I am writing a letter to someone over various items (baptism, the eucharist, the papacy ect.) and I noticed all the early church fathers and others quotes that www.catholic.com has and I was going to use them (giveing credit to where I got them of course) but, I was wondering how many quotes should I limit myself to on anygiven subject? I don’t want to kill him with bordom but, I want to use enought to beat the point across. Any advice?


#2

I usually give two, perhaps three- and let them know if they want to read more it is availible. Then, if they ask, I can look it up, or they can.


#3

[quote=Montie Claunch]I am writing a letter to someone over various items (baptism, the eucharist, the papacy ect.) and I noticed all the early church fathers and others quotes that www.catholic.com has and I was going to use them (giveing credit to where I got them of course) but, I was wondering how many quotes should I limit myself to on anygiven subject? I don’t want to kill him with bordom but, I want to use enought to beat the point across. Any advice?
[/quote]

My advice: be sure to use spell-check. It is really annoying to see misspelling after misspelling, with no apparent effort made to look up the right way.


#4

I vote for one…maybe two quotes at a time. Reason being that when large numbers of quotes are copied and pasted I myself usually read the first two…sometimes three…and skip the rest because I already have a feel for where the conversation is headed.

A plus is also the fact that you are not firing off all of your ammunition in one round…saving other relevant quotes for dissention!


#5

[quote=Sherlock]My advice: be sure to use spell-check. It is really annoying to see misspelling after misspelling, with no apparent effort made to look up the right way.
[/quote]

Not very charitable!


#6

[quote=thistle]Not very charitable!
[/quote]

To the contrary. People do judge a book by its cover. If you tried to argue with someone in person, and you were disheveled, dirty and unkempt, I would think they might disregard what you have to say based first on their bad impression. If they see that your work is thorough and well crafted, they’ll be more likely to listen to your arguments. Never give anyone any reason to disagree with you except with argument.

but, I was wondering how many quotes should I limit myself to on anygiven subject?

As in any ‘proof’ of various positions, go heaviest on Scripture, illuminate with the teaching of the Fathers (more sparingly) and perhaps use one quote from the Catechism, if you think it is applicable. (Especially if this person is a Protestant-- Scripture *must *be the first priority.)


#7

Yes, I know. I plan to use as much scripture as sanly possible but, I figured that I should use the Early Church fathers and such to say, “You see. This is how the Early Church beleived and intepreted the scriptures (if it was written at the time)”. A sort of historical precident. And I wanted to keep it well balanced. And I hope that the spell cheack on Microsoft Word never fails me. But, two or three quotes on a topic is about where I should hold things to?


#8

[quote=Montie Claunch]Yes, I know. I plan to use as much scripture as sanly possible but, I figured that I should use the Early Church fathers and such to say, “You see. This is how the Early Church beleived and intepreted the scriptures (if it was written at the time)”. A sort of historical precident. And I wanted to keep it well balanced. And I hope that the spell cheack on Microsoft Word never fails me. But, two or three quotes on a topic is about where I should hold things to?
[/quote]

Well, it depends. Take it on a case by case basis. Perhaps you can show say, three verses, and then list several other verses as reference so they can look on their own. Sometimes you’ll need a longer excursion. For the issue of the Eucharist, you can’t neglect large portions of John 6 as well as the institution at the Last Supper, and of course, it would also be helpful to tie it in with the Passover, being as these passages all occur in the context of the Passover (the eating of the lamb) and Jesus as the Lamb of God (all over Revelation). So, realize that you have topics which whole books can be and have been written on, and try to get a wide enough picture to convince someone basically and to inspire awe in them.

I do agree with using the Fathers and then the Catechism-- show the continuity-- the Bible says it, the Fathers believed it, the Church holds it. And BAM, it’s nailed shut.


#9

True, True but, I have the tendency to either go over board and do too much or not do it at all. And I want to kind of put a little monitor in the back of my mind to tell me, “Montie, You’re doing to much. Stop it.” I realize that a lot of dogmas will just take scripture and a little explaining in clear words (Euchrist, Purgatory) while some thing need the ECF (The Papacy and all its various components, confession, confirmation) and I think that fifteen pages is a tad excessive (though if one can make it through such a long thing on such a topic one would be hard pressed to argue but, then again not many people can sit through that many quotes)(well I can but, I find it really interesting and don’t start off hating Catholicism go figure).


#10

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