How ‘Nature’s fury’ replaced God’s fury

How ‘Nature’s fury’ replaced God’s fury

Evangelist Pat Robertson’s real mistake was to describe the calamity in Haiti as God’s work rather than Gaia’s work.

Pat Robertson, the US Christian evangelist who seeks headlines the way missiles seek heat, has understandably caused outrage with his craven comments on the earthquake in Haiti. That calamity is payback from God, he says, for Haitians who made ‘a pact with the devil’ by allegedly embracing voodoo over Jesus Christ.

Yet the real reason Robertson’s comments are shocking is not because he has misanthropically moralised a natural disaster as punishment for people’s sinful behaviour, but because he has done so in the name of God rather than Gaia. These days it is not acceptable to present terrible acts of nature as manifestations of God’s divine fury, but it is de rigueur to depict them as some kind of climatic payback for our greed and addiction to consumerism.

In keeping with his Good Book – in which ‘The Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth’ and so decided to send floods to punish us – Robertson says that Haiti has been ‘cursed’ for its rejection of Christian values, with poverty, political instability and now a calamitous earthquake (1). This follows his even wackier comments on Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in 2005, which he said was heavenly punishment for legal abortion in the US.

Many are slating his stupidity and backwardness. Yet his real mistake, it seems, was to deploy religious language, rather than pseudo-scientific language, to make his poisonous point. Because today, moralising natural disasters, personifying them, imbuing them with sentience and purpose and vengeance, is a popular pursuit amongst secularists, commentators and climate-change alarmists, for whom everything from flooding to almighty gusts of wind reveals the ‘connections between our unsustainable lifestyles and climate change’ (2).

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PACT WITH GAIA

510 Comments | Permalink Tim Blair Blog
Tim Blair
Friday, January 15, 2010 at 04:59am

Actor Danny Glover believes that the Haitian earthquake was caused by climate change and global warming:

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Says Glover: “When we see what we did at the climate summit in Copenhagen, this is the response, this is what happens, you know what I’m sayin’?” His obscene opinion would be bigger news if Glover had – in the manner of others – idiotically blamed a less-fashionable deity.

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I am surprised that anybody cares about celebrities’ opinions- they are paid to act, not share their opinions with the world.

You know, there is a bit of a difference here. No moral judgment on the victims of the disaster is carried by “Nature’s wrath” or “global warming”. There is one carried by a claim of “God’s fury”.

Pat Robertson makes me so mad when he says this kind of stuff. I think he’s one of the many reasons we Christians get a bad rep. Robertson, keep your mouth shut, you don’t speak for all of us!:mad:

Actually both views are identical insofar as Christianity teaches that famine, flood, earthquake, war, pestilence and disease are all caused by one thing: sin. Of course Rev. Robertson is wrong in trying to impose judgments upon the souls of others, as Christianity teaches that while one person might be suffering because of sin, he or she might be suffering for the sins of another, perhaps a stranger, rather than for their own sins (or for the sins of their fathers as Rev. Robertson implies).

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and how just one explains the Godly people who were also killed in this tragedy? like archbishop and many priests and seminarians, including a lady from brasil who did so much good for the children through out the world. this lady is considedered to be just like mother terese de calcuta.

[quote="wisdomseeker, post:7, topic:183195"]
and how just one explains the Godly people who were also killed in this tragedy? like archbishop and many priests and seminarians, including a lady from brasil who did so much good for the children through out the world. this lady is considedered to be just like mother terese de calcuta.

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It's not clear to me that Mr. Robertson considers the "archbishop and many priests and seminarians" - or any other Catholic for that matter - as "Godly people."

I’ve never been a fan of Pat Robertson, but I just wonder of the multitudes of people attacking him now, how many of them are donating anywhere near the amount of money to relief in Hait that Robertson is ?

I agree with you. he probably thinks that the CC is not Godly. i think that is why he says what he said. because he knows that the nation is 80% Catholic.

It’s not the amount of money that matters. It’s how much you donate compared to how much money you have. He could be donating millions, but those millions could be small change to Pat Robertson. Say all a poor person has is $10 and they donate it all to Hati, wouldn’t that mean so much more than a multi millionaire that donates only a couple hundred thousand dollars? I believe there is a parable in the bible about this. C.S. Lewis said that when you donate to the poor, that if you donate money and still feel comfortable with what you still have, then you have not donated enough. I am not trying to be judgemental, because I have not given any money, but I am just stating the facts.

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