How often Does a Priest Read the Sunday Gospel


#1

We have quite a few deacons at my parish so it is a rare Sunday Mass when we don’t have a deacon (who is not also a priest) present. As a result it is a unusual for a priest to actually read the Gospel.

(Weekdays are different story.)

What about at your parish? Who reads the Gospel on Sundays?


#2

We have two priests and one deacon.

I have only seen the deacon read occasionally.


#3

It’s about half-and-half. Sometimes the deacon proclaims and delivers the homily, sometimes the priest.


#4

We have a small church, no deacon, so our priest proclaims and gives a homily.

I have attended large churches where the deacon proclaims the gospel, but the priest always gave the homily, Is it “legal” for the deacon to give a homily?


#5

Yes a deacon may give the homily. Our deacons generally preach about once a month. But I’m not sure if those homilies are always for Sunday liturgies.


#6

We don’t have a deacon, so our priest always reads the gospel. I believe that it is the job of the deacon to read the gospel, if one is present.


#7

About 50/50 at our Church. We have two priests and two deacons. If there is a deacon present than he reads the gospel. The priest always gives the homily at our church.


#8

Two Priests, two Deacons. Deacons get one Sunday a Month to give the Homily. Deacons will however read the Gospel, when in attendance, though the presiding Priest gives the Homily.


#9

It is the responsibility of the deacon to read the gospel if one is present. Since we began living in Rome, we have had the privilege of attending several papal masses. A deacon always reads the gospel (no shortage of deacons here!), or in some cases chants it. Very impressive.


#10

4 priests and 6 deacons. There is always a deacon present during Mass and they read the Gospel. The priest will do the homily.


#11

Two priests, two deacons. Five Sunday Masses.

It all depends on which Mass you attend. Saturday night? 90% of the time you hear the priest. Mid morning Sunday? 90% you hear a deacon. :shrug:


#12

I go to a small parish. There are no deacons so the pastor reads the Sunday Gospel every week.


#13

This is my understanding also. We have our deacon 1 or 2 times a month. He gives a homily once a month. When we had a seminarian intern, Father has him read the Gospel when the deacon was not there. Otherwise, it is always our pastor.


#14

Are the Deacons in Rome Deacons in the traditional sense( studying for the Priesthood) or are they permanent Deacons?


#15

A deacon is a deacon is a deacon. In the traditional sense, a deacon is a man who has received the sacrament of Holy Orders to the diaconate. In the traditional sense, a deacon is ordained for service to the Christian community. St. Stephen, St. Lawrence, St. Ephrem and St. Francis come to mind immediately.


#16

It is the role of the deacon to proclaim the gospel wgen he serves at a mass in accordance with the GIRM. How often he preaches depends on the pastor.

Deacon Frank


#17

Even if the pope were present, it is the privilege of the deacon to proclaim the Gospel – as can be seen when a papal Mass is televised from Rome. Preaching the homily at all Masses once a month is average in our diocese for deacons.


#18

One priest and one deacon. The deacon always reads the gospel, but never preaches.


#19

We have a priest and three deacons. The priest preaches at most every Mass. The deacons preach at the early morning 7 a.m. Mass and the Spanish 11 a.m . Mass one or twice a month.

The weekend that the deacons were off on retreat, the priest commented about how spoiled he had gotten with three good deacons.

Things might change as we now have a priest “in residence.” His main ministry is to the two hospitals in town. However, he has agreed to say one or two Masses on the weekends.


#20

Lucky ducks! :smiley:

Large parish - no deacons, 1 priest.

Though we have had two of our parishioners ordained in the last few years :slight_smile:


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