How often does your Priest teach about sin in Homilies?


#1

How often does your Priest teach about about sin in his Homilies? Does he often give you insights into your failings and shortcomings and are in need of repentance, or does he give you the I’m ok, your ok, feel good fluff?


#2

Well in addition to our pastor, we have a lot of visiting priests including several Jesuits, and between all of them I would say we hear quite a bit about how we all fall short, and how we are all in need of God’s forgiveness, and suggestions for how to live a more holy life. I don’t think I’ve ever heard an “I’m ok, you’re ok” homily.


#3

depends on what you mean by “sin.” If you just mean the general term sin, then every homily at my parish touches on it. If you mean specific sins, like gossip, greed, pride, lust, etc then not very often. I wish priests would preach on specific sins because that is what confronts me with my need for forgiveness head on. General homilies about sin don’t move me as much; I have to still examine my own conscience and I don’t always do a really good job of that.


#4

when specific sins are mentioned they are usually “hot button” issues like abortion. This is fine and good, Catholics should proclaim from the rooftops what an evil abortion is. But the people who support abortion aren’t very likely to be in Mass on Sunday morning to begin with. Often the homily has an unintended bad effect on me - I become smug thinking how glad I am that I’m not evil like “those pro abortion people.”

I wish more homilies would address the sins all of us struggle with, especially church-going “good” Catholics, since those are the people that are usually at Mass. Things like gossip, pride, greed, laziness, etc. Give us concrete examples of a prideful attitude, or a greedy use of money! Make us really look at ourselves and make us realize that we might be heading down the same broad road as the abortionists.


#5

My uncle, who is a priest living in zambia, was in town this summer. We had Mass at our family reunion and he gave one heck of a good homily regarding contraception and Catholic teaching about being open to life. He didn’t mince words either! There were definitely many in my Catholic family who unfortunately needed to hear it.

I’ve never seen a priest so outspoken about the sin in our culture as he is. He has been in Zambia most of his life so when he comes back here to visit, he’s in shock at the way our society lives in the US. It definitely inspires many good homilies from him!


#6

We hear a lot about peace, love, and social justice in my parish. I haven’t heard the word “sin” during a homily in a long time, I think…


#7

I would find it helpful if our priest would mention it more often. Just because we KNOW what sin is, we still need to be reminded from time to time. Also, a little mentioning of Reconciliation every now and then would also be nice.


#8

I agree that sin must be addressed in homilies. But, if the faithful never hear about the love of God and how each individual exists due to the tremendous love of God, then it could have the same effect as not preaching about sin. Many of the faithful that come to Mass are at the brink of dispair due to life’s crosses that we all must carry. The Good News each week is that the Lord speaks to them to reassure them to trust in his love and mercy and to be patient in their struggles.

Deacon Tony


#9

I don’t think we have sin anymore, do we? :banghead: Last I heard it went out with VII.


#10

My parish priest touches upon sin once in a great while and I can’t ever remember him speaking of the evil of abortion…

When he first came to our parish, in his first homily, he wanted to make sure that all homosexuals and lesbians knew that they were most welcome in our parish…he didn’t say non-practicing either… and this was at the Childrens’ Mass…:frowning: He needs a lot of prayers …
I know he was just trying to make everyone feel accepted, but I think this was a little overboard since we are a small parish and everyone knows everyone else.


#11

Yes, and he admits that he sins, too! Not surprising, since our pastor is a great advocate of confession. What impresses me is that he speaks in specific terms, mentions a broad enough range of related sins that he is fairly likely to have tagged everybody, and always presents all of this within the context of turning around, coming back, and letting God and His graces back in.

I have never heard so many homilies that are both a challenge and an invitation at the same time.


#12

The only time I heard sin this year was THAT THE CHURCH is Sinful!


#13

[quote=Deacon Tony560]I agree that sin must be addressed in homilies. But, if the faithful never hear about the love of God and how each individual exists due to the tremendous love of God, then it could have the same effect as not preaching about sin. Many of the faithful that come to Mass are at the brink of dispair due to life’s crosses that we all must carry. The Good News each week is that the Lord speaks to them to reassure them to trust in his love and mercy and to be patient in their struggles.

Deacon Tony
[/quote]


I think my pastor does both very well, too well. He does express the love of God also but not in the Barney-style kinda thing. 'H love you, you love Him, etc etc.

I think I am quite blessed in experiencing a homily where I can do my examination of consicence! And every Sunday! He is surely a gifted homilist, no doubt. Although he can tend to be very negative which has sent parishioners away to go tip-toe in the tulips in some other parish, I must admit I admire his tenacity. His community skills is lacking, but no one is perfect.

Blesisngs,
Shoshana


#14

There is a Sunday morning radio show on WABC in New York hosted by a Catholic priest and a rabbi. This morning, a twice divorced caller who recently came back to the Church after years of being away called to ask if the rules had changed in her absence since she invariably was the only one in Church who didn’t receive Communion. The priest, who happens to be a relatively weak defender of the faith especially in comparison to the rabbi, refused to address the issue. Instead of using the call for a teaching moment about blaspheming Jesus when receiving Him when not in the state of grace, he told her not to worry about other people. I guess we’re all OK


#15

Now that I started going to the TLM sin is weekly thing. Every week a new sin to talk about. The older priest gives very long homilies. I don’t mind they are all relevant to today.
Kathy


#16

[quote=Catholic29]How often does your Priest teach about about sin in his Homilies? Does he often give you insights into your failings and shortcomings and are in need of repentance, or does he give you the I’m ok, your ok, feel good fluff?
[/quote]

I hope these poll results make their way to the Vatican. 60% with no mention of sin whatsoever.


#17

[quote=RBushlow]I hope these poll results make their way to the Vatican. 60% with no mention of sin whatsoever.
[/quote]

That is probably true, but I believe our priests say a lot about sin without actually using the word “sin”. There is certainly a call to holyness and what that entails. I definitely realize that I often fall short of what God desires from me so while the message is positive and encouraging I know I need to ask forgiveness every day and strive to follow Jesus ever more closely. One of the more recent was on the good things available to those who seek the sacrament of penance. Time to “hit the box” boy! I have been reading a lot of the stuff in these forums and it saddens me a great deal to hear of all the problems and abuses that appear to be endemic in our Church.


#18

[quote=rwoehmke]That is probably true, but I believe our priests say a lot about sin without actually using the word “sin”. .
[/quote]


I beg to differ. A lot tip toe through the tulips singing a Spiritual Barney song. And that is the whole problem. People have no idea what is sin and what isn’t. They figure if it is consensual and it doesn’t hurt anybody (all positive stuff, right?), it is okay. The popular thing now is menage a trois (amongst family and friends).

I do not mean that everything needs to be negative but I am sick and tired of EVERYTHING having to be positive. It is almost like a cult. There is nothing positive about sin. Mel Gibson portrayed that quite efficiently. One saint once said that if we were able to see our soul, how horrid it would be. And he was talking about ‘good’ Catholics. Not grave sinners. This needs to be brought home…

Blessings,
Shoshnaa


#19

I tend to agree with the above post. All the saints that I have read about had no misconceptions about sin and their own sinfulness. Sermons delivered with kid gloves on do me no favor. I prefer to know explicitly the straight and narrow way of Chrisitian discipleship; at least then I will know when I have strayed or stepped into sin/my own sinfulness. My soul needs this conviction and clarity. Of course, always dosed and balanced with God’s love and infinite forgiveness.

Unfortunately, I have come to not expect to be fed solid food in the mass sermons, more the milk for infant digestion, or a few crumbs to nibble on. Most sermons are too vague and global or feel good for much personal application. My adaptation has been to take more responsibility to seek out and feed my self. Especially at mass where the Eucharist has become my substantial food. I am not trying to be cynical here, just conditioned by the lack of cutting edge, challenge in the vast majority of sermons for too many years.


#20

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