How should a Catholic resign from work?


#1

I was offered a new job and have accepted it I now need to hand in my notice from my current job.

:smiley:

Initially I wanted to send in a scathing attack as they have been nasty to me but thought as a Catholic I should write a lovely one instead but that wouldn’t really be true. I guess a basic and short letter would be best but should I put anything into it really?

Thanks.


#2

Be as gracious as you can you never know when that reference will be needed


#3

I would be careful to protect myself, if I needed them as a reference. However, if I didn’t need such a thing, I would be objective and honest about what has occurred. If they are legitimate failings in the workplace, they should want to know so that errors can be fixed. When I retire in a few years, this is the kind of letter I may write. Meanwhile, I do what I can now to work for change.


#4

Just resign in the same manner as if they had been nice to work for. Congratulations on the new job. Just be glad you are leaving and leave all of the negative there with them.


#5

No. All you need to write is that effective on such and such a date, you will no longer be able to continue in their employ for personal reasons. That’s true and all they need to know, and want to know.

And NEVER badmouth a previous employer in the presence of your new employer or coworkers. That can seriously backfire.


#6

Go through the motions - blah blah -
How long you have worked there…,
How many friendships you made - and the high quality of fun coworkers - etc
How much you have learned - from job and people
How challenging it sometimes was -
And how you wish everyone good luck in the future -
Give a email that people can reach you at, if so interested - ( set up phony yahoo email )

People usually send out an email - reaches 50 or so people.


#7

That’s about it. If you don’t have anything nice to say, just smile and say adios.

You never know when you are going to run into these people again and want their cooperation, perhaps outside of their business altogether.


#8

Congratulations on the new job!!! I hope you’ll be immensely happier at this one.


#9

You know about the spiritual works of mercy.


#10

Keep your resignation letter short and to the point. If there is an exit interview you might want to mention some of the ways you felt disrespected but keep it short and civil. I am assuming that the treatment you’ve received is why you are leaving. Some companies don’t really care about turnover though in my opinion. Then, write a scathing, bare your soul, angry missive which will never be sent. It’s very cathartic!


#11

That’s wonderful news! I know you’ve been unhappy in your current job.

As a long-time HR person, I strongly suggest you keep it short and professional. You have accepted another position, and your last day here will be (date). If there are any projects you need to wrap up before leaving, mention that you will do so.

And as has already been said, don’t talk about their problems at your new job. Shake the dust off your feet and move on.


#12

Catholic or not; keep it short, simple, and civil. That is not the place for opinion, or inflammatory statements (even if they are totally true). Provide a reason only if it is or you think it is necessary. Follow the employers policy on time frame (two weeks, for weeks, etc.).

If there is a HR department separate from your one up, you can request an exit interview. Even there, I would only present the reasons for leaving, work situation, and facts to support the issues you have had.

Edited to add: Congratulations on a new job. I do hope it is rewarding and meets your expectations!


#13

Congats on the new job.


#14

Congratulations! I hope you’re happier at your new job.

Basic and short is best. If you do want to write something scathing you can always do so and then burn it or rip it up. Throw away the bad memories and start fresh at your new place.


#15

I wouldn’t go to that length. Just inform them you’ll be quitting and the effective date of your last day. I would make sure to give them the amount of notice they require - usually where I’ve worked that’s been 2 weeks - and not go into any detail.


#16

Why put yourself into a box. As a Christian you can also be nice about it!..


#17

Anytime someone wants to do something dramatic or make a strong statement I suggest they ask themselves,“What do you want the outcome to be,” basically, what is your goal here? Then to ask themselves if what they are planning will achieve that goal. When it comes to writing letters once it’s out of your hands it’s out of your control; it could be sent to your new employer, supervisor. Never talk badly about your former employer to your new one or your coworkers; not once. You want to make a good impression on them and grumbling will only make you look petty.

I’ve left jobs in which I was bullied and also rode out the bullying until the bully was fired or put on notice. I encourage you to process this with someone or someone, like a priest and a therapist. I’m not thinking this would be a long term thing, but you will process the anger and the feeling of helplessness faster with the help of a professional.

You have an opportunity for a fresh start so keep it positive.

I wish you the best at your new job.


#18

This cannot be emphasized enough. Professionalism is the best course.

Never burn bridges, no matter how certain you are done with them.


#19

To whom it may concern,

This is my two week notice prior to my resignation from your employment, thank you for the opportunity to work at company name, if there’s anything I can do in these two weeks to help with the transition I would be happy to assist.

Sincerely,
Your name.


#20

Burn as many bridges as possible after your last paycheck.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.