How to confront Catholic antisemitism?

We’re clearly dealing with a global upsurge in antisemitic speech and activity, and recently I’ve become aware of how prevalent antisemitism is among some Catholics on platforms like Twitter. To be frank, it’s horrifying. And I’m not talking here about people who are arguing about Israel or who seek the conversion of the world to Christ. I’m talking about people who claim that Jews are out to destroy Christianity, people who deny basic historical truths about the Holocaust, people who believe Jews control the World Bank, etc.

So my question is this: how can right thinking (as in properly formed thinking) Catholics respond to this? How can we confront and denounce it? What do you think would be most effective? Lay groups? Priests speaking out in homilies? Diocesan efforts? Individual responses to antisemitism when we see it? Something else entirely?

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All of the above.

If we only defend & respect the dignity of people who are the majority, then our virtue is hollow.

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Aren’t these the same folks who subscribe to every fringe conspiracy on the internet?

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I tend to agree about your first statement. Regarding the second, yes! I’ve been told, literally, on Twitter by fellow Catholics that I should be more concerned about attacks against Christians than attacks against Jews. That’s not how Christianity works, though. And certainly there’s enough outrage for members of every faith who are attacked.

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These folks used to be fringe freaks. Thanks to social media and similar platforms, OJ isn’t just for breakfast anymore, if you know what I mean. They’re no longer some small quiet group.

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I imagine the right strategy is to confront it when it is seen, but do is in a corrective manner rather than a PC slamming. Educate and engage rather than shame. We need a change in hearts rather than just hiding their thinking.

I’m not convinced it is growing, I think the internet just helps uncover the sentiment that some families have long held and passed on to the next generation.

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As a somewhat cultural Jew, I don’t have answers but I want to thank you for posting the question! :heart::heart::heart:

The biggest realization I made growing up is that some people, no matter their faith or politics, just have a NEED to hate someone. I imagine it’s a way to place blame elsewhere other than themselves?

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I think that mostly explains any hate group that has ever existed. The human tendency - God forbid - is to look at others in order to avoid looking at ourselves.

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Respectfully, there is a documented jump in antisemitic speech and activity – it’s at its highest level since the Holocaust. This is why I feel desperate to respond to it. If only more had done so in, say, 1933 Germany.

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I honestly can’t understand why this isn’t being talked about by ALL Catholics right now.

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As far as the Catholic Church is concerned, anti semitism is wrong. I would encourage people to read NOSTRA AETATE:

:http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_decl_19651028_nostra-aetate_en.html

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Amen, amen!

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I’m not sure that it is “clear,” to be honest. I don’t condone it by any means, but I think the only thing happening is that more of it is reported. This is just a media attempt to create the illusion of widespread hatred increasing across the world. I don’t buy it. I don’t think the statistics are any different than any other year.

They report what they want to. Several months ago, the news channels made out the “migration camps” to be a huge deal, as if the US was doing things differently than before. They were on the story for a few weeks, then all of the sudden it’s not around anymore. It didn’t get the response they wanted, so they moved on to something else.

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Where is this documented? It is not something I’ve noticed.

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I’d say that our response in speech should be to confront it where we see it. Broad brushes are often counterproductive because they mash people together rather than confront specific ideas.

If you are concerned that it is growing (and I am) the right course of action is not to make statements against hazy groups of people on the internet. Instead be prepared to shield the persecuted when words bubble over into physical violence.

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I’ll be honest, and hopefully respectful: I find your response frightening. I’m not sure how anyone can absorb what’s happening in the world around us and think the upsurge is being exaggerated (and for political reasons – that’s extremely frightening and, frankly, a way to ignore what’s happening and our responsibility to condemn it).

See below for starters:

(Feel free to ask for more – this is the tip of the iceberg.)

Again, it’s just what is reported. Who decides what is reported? Do all countries have the same standards for reporting these things? Who decides what makes the news?

For all we know, the actual cases are less, but they’re just reporting it more.

Yep, and it seems like, for some, the only way to feel big is to make someone else feel small.

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One incident is too many.

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They (the media) can create these narratives. They can create victims and heroes. There are probably hundreds of high school climate change activists, but one of them gets all of the attention. How did this happen? Who decides to make someone “the voice” and “the face” of certain movements?

I don’t believe these stories. Confronting it is not a concern to me, because all hatred should be despised, not just what is directed at certain groups.

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