How to dispose of a *very poorly translated* bible?


#1

Several weeks ago I asked about disposing of a rosary, this time around it’s about disposing of a bible. I would dispose of it like anything holy, yet this particular bible translation bothers me very much.

I was at my childhood home cleaning out some things and came across a bible my brother gave me when I was 13(27 now), I was looking for a smaller easier to carry bible anyway so I thought I would look at it again. I don’t know if this matters at all but my brother is one of those ‘catholics are evil’ types (I pray often to forgive him for all the conflict we have).

Anyway whenever I look at a translation I always go to John chapter 2 to see how the translation depicts the verbal exchange between Mary and Jesus. This particular translation floored me in shock. It actually said his response was ‘‘Mother don’t tell me what to do!’’

How disrespectful that sounds, maybe I am interpreting it wrong but that just doesn’t sit right with me at all.

I don’t know if I should burn it or just throw it in the garbage, any advice? Or am I just interpreting it wrong? The translation btw is (Stand in the Gap New Testament; 1997. Promise Keepers/American Bible Society. Commemorative Edition New Testament - Contemporary English Version.)


#2

Barbeque.

-Tim-


#3

Amen.


#4

Oh man, I would keep it just because of that line alone! How hilarious. Got any other gems from that Bible?:rotfl::rotfl:


#5

HAHAHAHA Hey I saw the title and thought, how dare you dispose of a bible even if its not catholic, keep it! But after hearing that…lol wow. Its VERY poorly translated indeed. Id read more from it to be honest, see what other funny things in it are, make a good judgement. If it is truly like that in the rest of the book, i like the barbaque idea. Oh can you tell us what translation it is, I want one! Or send it to me lol ill do the devotional of daily jokes.


#6

I’m sure the OP has other examples but I have one that particularly stands out. Both the Contemporary English Version and The Message are awful “modern-day” translations. It’s supposed to be a way to make the Bible more accessible to people today, specifically people who have a lesser reading ability. All well and good but what’s bad is that the translator has a specific agenda in mind, specifically for the “anti-religious but pro-Jesus” crowd. Compare the translations for Matthew 11:28-30:

“Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest in your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” (NRSV)

vs.

“Are you tired? Worn out? Burned out on religion? Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life. I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me–watch how I do it. Learn the unforced rhythms of grace. I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly.” (The Message, emphasis mine)

My old evangelical-type Protestant church used the Message version of Matthew 11:28-30 for a whole sermon series. And it made me cringe every time he quoted it. “Burned out on religion?” That translation just makes me want to :banghead:

Catholic translations are so much more reliable. Even a lot of my more intellectually minded Protestant friends agree.


#7

Stand-in-the-Gap-a-Sacred-Assembly-of-Men-1997-Commemorative-Ed-New-Testament I would provide the link, but am afraid of it being against forum rules


#8

No, that one verse had me so shocked I almost threw the book on the floor in disgust. I just put it back where I had it to begin with until I could decide. It’s at my fathers house when I visit him again I will take it home and gladly burn it.


#9

Well now I wanna bang my head on bricks as well…wow…I had a fb friend who loved Jesus and praised God…AND ranted about “religious people”. WHAT? JESUS WAS THE ULTIMATE RELIGIOUS PERSON!


#10

Flame-thrower target ! ? :smiley: :bounce:


#11

I know pretty much everyone in this sub-forum hates the CEV. Regardless of whatever we think of it, this translation does have an Imprimatur, or at least the Catholic NT version of it does. It is not a perfect translation (no translation is, no matter what anyone says) but it was the first Bible translation I actually read myself.

I wouldn’t throw it in the garbage, maybe throw it in the recycling bin, give it to someone, or leave it somewhere in public where perhaps, a curious individual will read it and become interested in Jesus.

The verse you stated is John 2:4, where it actually says “You must not tell me what to do,” in which Jesus also says before that “Mother, my time has not yet come.”


#12

I have searched through many different translations, and I have yet to find one that says, "Mother you must not tell me what to do. " For one thing he always addresses Mary as “woman” and the gist of what he says is, this is not our/my concern.

Here are a few translations:

"Dear woman, that’s not our problem,” Jesus replied. “My time has not yet come.”

Jesus said, ‘Woman, what do you want from me? My hour has not come yet.’

Jesus said to her, “Woman, what does your concern have to do with Me? My hour has not yet come.”


#13

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