How to have true contrition for your sins


#1

I fear that I do not have a good enough contrition for my sins.
How do you get your contrition?
Some repentance often comes to me if I look at Jesus on the Cross or a picture from the Passion of the Christ. Then there is imperfect contrition gained by fearing punishment, but
I wish I could always have perfect contrition.
I guess I have started to realize in my weekly Confessions that I don't have a perfect contrition. I don't feel sorrowful enough over my sinfulness.
There's just so much to work on I don't know where to start and it seems like an enormous task, this is where I think I am being called to rely on God much more for everything and to help me repent.
Any tips?


#2

I found this which is interesting
truecatholic.us/contrition.htm


#3

[quote="Christine85, post:1, topic:313559"]

There's just so much to work on I don't know where to start and it seems like an enormous task, this is where I think I am being called to rely on God much more for everything and to help me repent.

[/quote]

You have answered your question yourself..May be a small heartfelt prayer everyday for a few mins to ask God to give true and perfect repentance for our sins.I think it can be a start

I too had the same question so many times.


#4

As human beings we seldom attan perfection.

These words from St Therese of Lisieux

“This desire [to be holy] could certainly appear daring if one were to consider how weak and imperfect I was, and how after seven years in the religious life, I am still weak and imperfect. I always feel, however, the same bold confidence of becoming a great saint because I do not count on my own merits since I have none, but I trust in God who is Virtue and Holiness. God alone, content with my weak efforts, will raise me to Himself and make me a saint, clothing me in His infinite merits. I didn’t think then that one had to suffer very much to reach sanctity, but God was not long in showing me this was so and in sending me the trials I have already mentioned.” Therese remarked that such holiness may “not be evident to the eyes of mortals.”

“Walk with simplicity in the way of the Lord and do not torment your spirit.
Learn to hate your faults but to hate them calmly.” Saint [Padre] Pio

God bless

Praying for some soaking but reasonable rain for your city…a bit parched there lately, unlike some areas of our country that are inundated with flood-waters. .


#5

There is a beautiful claim that while the Roman Missal has no official prayers for the Gift of Miracles it does have them for the Gift of Tears.

For the Gift of Tears.

COLLECT.—O Almighty and most merciful God, who, to quench the thirst of thy people, madest water spring out of a rock; draw from our stony hearts the tears of compunction, that effectually bewailing our sins, we may, through thy mercy, obtain pardon for them. Thro'.

SECRET.—Mercifully look down, O Lord, on the offerings we make to thy majesty; and draw from our eyes such torrents of tears, as they extinguish the burning flames we deserve for our sins. Thro'.

P. COMM.—Mercifully pour forth into our hearts, O Lord God, the grace of thy holy Spirit: which, by sighs and tears, may make us wash away the stains of our sins, and obtain for us the desired pardon. Thro'.


#6

As someone who struggles off and on with this same problem, I can offer two suggestions:

  1. Don't let a perceived lack of contrition (or feeling that you don't have enough contrition) stop you from going to confession for even one day. We're not required to have perfect contrition to receive forgiveness through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. The desire to make an honest confession, whether it comes from fear, guilt, a sense of duty, or some other reason is enough. Keep in mind that God gives us graces as well as forgiveness through this sacrament. One of the graces He offers is a deeper hatred for sin and over time the deeper feeling of contrition that you seek. But in the end, God doesn't judge us on our emotions...He judges us on our decisions. So decide to go to confession when you know that you're in a state of mortal sin and don't worry too much about how you feel emotionally.

  2. Work on your prayer life. I'm reading a book right now called Fire Within by Fr. Thomas Dubay which I would highly recommend to anyone interested in understanding how deep prayer can solve all of our other problems. The book is an examination of the teachings of St. Teresa of Avila and St. John of the Cross, and it's really opening my eyes to the truth that constant prayer and a life of virtue go hand in hand. We can't have one without the other, and to the degree that one is lacking the other will suffer as well.

So instead of directing seeking the emotional side of contrition, try to develop a deeper love for God by striving for infused prayer.


#7

The act of contrition says:

“And I detest all my sins because I dread the loss of heaven and the pains of hell, BUT MOST OF ALL BECAUSE THEY HAVE OFFENDED THEE MY GOD WHO ART ALL GOOD AND DESERVING OF ALL MY LOVE . . .”

We show true contrition not merely by fearing the punishment but because we love God so much that any time we’re unfaithful it causes us true pain and remorse.

Beg God for the grace to love him more.


#8

You can always pray for a more sincere and authentic contrition. I sometimes do.


#9

[quote="mgoforth, post:6, topic:313559"]
As someone who struggles off and on with this same problem, I can offer two suggestions:

  1. Don't let a perceived lack of contrition (or feeling that you don't have enough contrition) stop you from going to confession for even one day. We're not required to have perfect contrition to receive forgiveness through the Sacrament of Reconciliation. The desire to make an honest confession, whether it comes from fear, guilt, a sense of duty, or some other reason is enough. Keep in mind that God gives us graces as well as forgiveness through this sacrament. One of the graces He offers is a deeper hatred for sin and over time the deeper feeling of contrition that you seek. But in the end, God doesn't judge us on our emotions...He judges us on our decisions. So decide to go to confession when you know that you're in a state of mortal sin and don't worry too much about how you feel emotionally.

  2. Work on your prayer life. I'm reading a book right now called Fire Within by Fr. Thomas Dubay which I would highly recommend to anyone interested in understanding

how deep prayer can solve all of our other problems. The book is an examination of the teachings of St. Teresa of Avila and St. John of the Cross, and it's really opening my eyes to the truth that constant prayer and a life of virtue go hand in hand. We can't have one without the other, and to the degree that one is lacking the other will suffer as well.

So instead of directing seeking the emotional side of contrition, try to develop a deeper love for God by striving for infused prayer.

[/quote]

Hey thanks for the advice interesting that you should have mentioned that book as I have that one on loan from the Carmelite library. It takes so long to read though as there's so many words on each page... But I know what you mean about contemplative prayer. I try to make time most days for contemplative prayer. Though have not been doing it all that much lately. Maybe it's time to devote myself to it


#10

Thankyou all for your replies. Yes I should beg God that I may love Him more.
And beg for true contrition also.


#11

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