How to not be afraid to give some items to the homeless?


#1

I am female and have some new blankets that I would like to give to some homeless people however I’m a bit afraid in approaching as some have some severe mental illnesses/can sometimes respond with anger (not their fault of course).

I could just “do it the easy way” and give to the Christian charity in the area who would them distribute the blankets but I would rather have courage and love and give them directly myself.

Would anyone have any advice on how to think about it?:slightly_smiling_face:
Thanks


#2

If you gave them to s shelter, Catholic Charities, or to a battered woman’s home, you would be sure that they go to someone who needs them.

If you do it yourself, just ask the person if they need a blanket. Bring a friend if you are intimidated. Don’t put yourself in a situation that is dangerous just to prove you are open minded

Most homeless people are regular people who have had some hard times or made some bad choices. They are not out to get you.


#3

I’m intrigued by your wanting to eliminate the middle man.
Could you volunteer for a charity like a homeless shelter or outreach?
Then you’ll be with other people and feel safer?


#4

give them to st vinnies to distribute


#5

I would not - give an item - directly to them.
Plus - a tougher homeless guy - will come along -
and beats up that fellow homeless guy - for the item.

I heard that no good deed goes unpunished - it’s not scriptural -
but there is some grains of truth - to that saying.


#6

It’s not less loving to give them to a reputable charity. You’re still sharing them with people who need them.


#7

I am just being realistic.
Unfortunately near my area,most of the people who are homeless usually do have severe mental illnesses and it is very sad that they are excluded from society or ignored:(


#8

I agree.I think in my case though I would like to do it personally at least this time because it would seem to me that it would be nice for them to have contact with a wide variety of people and not just charity workers just for "dignity sake if nothing else?


#9

What would be the risk please as I want to be cautious?

At the same time,whether I give it directly or Vinnies etc gives it,because it’s a blanket a “tougher” homeless person could take it off them either way I would think?


#10

Well then go in the daytime, perhaps with a friend, and give only in public areas where someone can call the police if nessecary.

Maybe get some Mace/pepper spray, just in case


#11

Where I go to the bank here there is usually a beggar nearby. A woman in her thirties used to be there a lot. She was alone and out in the open where people are passing.

It felt okay for me to have a conversation with her and give her a bit of money. I saw her about once a month. I asked her if she could use pillows and she said yes. I had an excess of bed pillows at home and put two in my trunk. When she got them she gave me a big hug of thanks.

It depends on the situation and how you feel about approaching a beggar.


#12

Here in Aus the fastest growing homeless group is women over 50. Mental illness is not a factor in it

btw mace is illegal here


#13

Sometimes, if you give money, they don’t think it’s enough - and give you a look.
If they see you again - they expect the same treatment too -
so…they might be offended at a blanket…instead of receiving cash.
Then they may just try to sell the blanket - for a few nips of cheap whiskey…etc


#14

The Good Samaritan did not give a bag of money and items to the man in need. The Good Samaritan knew where there was a shelter who could best address the needs of the man.

The Good Samaritan then donated to that facility.

Be like the Good Samaritan.


#15

I keep vouchers for a franchise takeaway (enough for fries and water) and hand them out. Most accept but I have had ‘Just give me change’. I consider it rude and if able to identify the person would never offer them anything again.


#16

I think it’s important to give wisely rather than just giving for the sake of it.


#17

I remember cashing in my federal taxes check -
and seeing a tough older guy outside, near the liquor store -
I approached him - he looked at me afraid -
I asked him - do you need any money ?
He immediately smiled - when he saw a twenty in my hand -
and let out a sigh of relief - and shared with me his troubles - very sincere.
He looked like a biker - honest though -
so I gave him - two more twenties and told him to say a prayer for me -
well, 10 hours later - I swear - there was this fun vibe - over the town -
this guy must of bought booze for all his friends or something -
like the shade had been lifted over that part of town.


#18

Sadly, at least in my city, many homeless people I encounter on the street do seem to be struggling with mental illness. They often act aggressive or ramble incoherently. I would be concerned for my own safety approaching many of them, so I understand the OP’s concern. There is a whole other group of homeless people around here who live in their vehicles, and these are possibly the ones who have lost jobs and have fallen on hard times. Many of these people are wary of strangers too, also concerned for their own safety. I really do think the homeless shelter, food pantry or donation center is the way to go for helping the homeless, especially if you are not confident in unpredictable situations.


#19

This is true and unfortunate but it is more the case referring to the city CBD.
Where I am would still be considered Metro but not the city and thankfully there aren’t too many homeless people,but the few that there are do often have severe mental illness (not their fault of course).
They are usually males here too.I haven’t seen females thankfully, but I have seen females who were homeless asking for money in the city cbd.


#20

Because of them having a mental illness is an even more reason why I would like to give the blankets myself as opposed to giving to a charity.
I think a lot of these people are neglected or not loved/have friendship/social contact and I think they are included in the “least of thee” that Jesus spoke of.
The blanket is helpful in the winter,but it is just material-the social contact and the thought that someone cares might mean even more to a person in this situation.

At the same time,I want to be cautious because there can be risks involved like you mentioned.


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