How to talk to liberal friends


#1

Some of my friends I have found out are quite liberal, and while I dont like their views, I dont want to just say they aren’t my friends anymore. How do you all think I should talk to them and try to convince them that their views maybe aren’t in line with those of Jesus?


#2

As Saint Francis once said Preach often and sometimes use words. So just by living an example you are saying all that needs to be said. And if you need to use words use them with love.


#3

[quote=sanpablo]Some of my friends I have found out are quite liberal, and while I dont like their views, I dont want to just say they aren’t my friends anymore. How do you all think I should talk to them and try to convince them that their views maybe aren’t in line with those of Jesus?
[/quote]

When you say “liberal,” do you mean they are politically liberal but still call themselves “Catholic” or “Christian?” If not, you will have a hard time convincing them they ought to aspire to be like Christ in their views, since they haven’t chosen to follow him in their spirits.

On the other hand, if they are “liberal Christians,” you can take them, when the timing is appropriate and in love, back to the words of Jesus and the teachings of the Church. The extreme difficulty with people like this, as you are probably well aware by now, is that they are bound and determined to hold onto what they believe, regardless of what proof you show them that they’re wrong.

I find that no matter what the case, prayer and fasting has the greatest effect. :thumbsup:


#4

As surinpure notes, it matters what you mean by liberal, as that determines your approach. Personally, I think it comes down to keeping yourself as well-informed as possible and then being able to talk in a way that’s relevant to the person you talk with. For instance, the other day I got into conversation with an LDS (mormon) missionary. We avoided politics (I’m politically to the left, though moderately so, and it’s a safe bet most LDS people are politically right), but instead just talked about our respective faiths. I asked him specific questions about his, and encouraged him to ask me about mine. I was able to explain things like purgatory, and the centrality and meaning of the sacaraments to him. I think we both learned a lot.

On the other hand, living in Manhattan, I interact with a lot of people who are not only politically liberal, but often outright hostile to religion as well. With them I prefer to talk politics, such as health care and peace, topics which we share in common, and then bring in the fact that it’s because of my faith, not in spite of it, that I hold these positions (other issues such as abortion are trickier - a lot of emotion involved, and it’s difficult to find a common language, but I’m working on it).

Of course it helps if they’re actively seeking dialog. People who already know all the answers are, by and large, not interested in what you have to say.


#5

[quote=MonicaC]As Saint Francis once said Preach often and sometimes use words. So just by living an example you are saying all that needs to be said. And if you need to use words use them with love.
[/quote]

…great post…thanks!


#6

I talk to them realllll slooooowwwwww

No, I am just friendly with them. Encourage them by my actions. I never make a big deal of my faith. I just try to be kind and helpful.


#7

[quote=sanpablo]Some of my friends I have found out are quite liberal, and while I dont like their views, I dont want to just say they aren’t my friends anymore. How do you all think I should talk to them and try to convince them that their views maybe aren’t in line with those of Jesus?
[/quote]

Well…My husband is both liberal politically and in his beliefs regarding the Catholic Church…:eek:
We are in a constant struggle… but as some others have previously
stated…lead by example…
BTW, pray for me.:slight_smile:


#8

[quote=MonicaC]As Saint Francis once said Preach often and sometimes use words. So just by living an example you are saying all that needs to be said. And if you need to use words use them with love.
[/quote]

Just what I was thinking!! I had to learn the hard way. Now I Pray:gopray2: and Pray:gopray2: and Pray:gopray2: and Pray:gopray2: and Pray.:gopray2:

Only when asked (they are seeking) do I offer the church teachings and I try to actually find something written (in catholic answers or new advent, the bible or our catechism) so I don’t screw up the answer. And then I pray some more.

Finally - I try hard to live my life as God would have me so I am always an example of God.

May we all be filled with God’s Grace so that all we meet will meet God through our actions and words,

God Bless,
Donna


#9

[quote=Annunciata]Well…My husband is both liberal politically and in his beliefs regarding the Catholic Church…:eek:
We are in a constant struggle… but as some others have previously
stated…lead by example…
BTW, pray for me.:slight_smile:
[/quote]

…something tells me that I would like your husband… sounds like my kinda guy…politically speaking anywayhttp://img.shopping.com/images1/di/61/65/54/33/71/6e7a5056497176746b68394b66424f6367-100x100.jpg.:thumbsup:


#10

Hello all,

i would like to start a new political party called Remocrats. I find that I am very Democratic on “social” issues like the environment and caring for the needy and very Republican on moral issues like abortion and culture of life issues.

It just amazes me that people are opposed to the death penalty but support abortion. I find that with culture of life issues a lot of liberals are informed. Many have never seen the end result of an abortion. I have swayed many minds by simply explaining the process and sometimes showing pictures. With birth control I have discussed the “prophecies” given in Humane (sp?) Vitae and many of my women friends agree about how since they started using pills etc. they feel more objectified. So sometime information helps.


#11

[quote=space ghost]…something tells me that I would like your husband… sounds like my kinda guy…politically speaking anywayhttp://img.shopping.com/images1/di/61/65/54/33/71/6e7a5056497176746b68394b66424f6367-100x100.jpg.:thumbsup:
[/quote]

Why thank you SG! Maybe that’s why I like you so much…:wink:
Are you sure you’re not him in disguise???:eek:


#12

It’s OK to have ‘liberal’ friends. I have some atheist and agnostic friends who are yet politically conservative. Just because we disagree on religious or political issues doesn’t mean we have to argue all the time. Sometimes we can just have a beer together.


#13

i would like to start a new political party called Remocrats. I find that I am very Democratic on “social” issues like the environment and caring for the needy and very Republican on moral issues like abortion and culture of life issues.

I would so happily join your new political party! I call myself a “bleeding heart liberal” but in my own life I’m actually quite conservative – I am staunchly pro-life (for every kind of human!) yet love the environment, think there is a need for some kinds of “welfare” that so many conservative rail against, I hate the thought of this “pre-emptive” war, the deconstruction of social security and so on – I just try to live as I feel Jesus instructed me to – I love my neighbors: poor mothers, homeless, Iraqis, Koreans, Chinese, minimum wage earners, and the wealthy as well – and if someone were to ask for my coat I’d give them my sweater also politically speaking; it’s why I consider myself a liberal.

Please – when talking to your “liberal” friends do not try to make it about faith – I am a very faith-filled person but it makes me vote differently than it makes you vote – and I don’t sit around thinking about how “conservatives” are going against the church because I don’t think any of us are, it’s politics – not faith –

Now if they’re liberal in their FAITH that’s different. In that case be kind and gentle and answer questions when asked with as much grace as you can muster – be the understanding, encouraging voice of Jesus – not the judgmental voice that might pop into ones head – we all have such a voice but we should try to keep it as internal as possible!


#14

If they are Catholic, then according to Ben Douglass:

"
[font=Arial]First off, you can quote official Church documents and canon law, where they define heresy and schism, and discuss worthiness for the reception of Communion. Then, make it clear to this person the absurdity of what he/she is doing. The Catholic Church teaches that when your friend recieves Communion, he is eating and drinking judgment on himself, that what he does is repugnant to God, and that every time he recieves he digs himself deeper and deeper into hell. Now, it is patently absurd to insist that one is a member of an institution which teaches such a thing about oneself. I for one would never want to belong to an institution that taught such a thing about me! Much less would I want to participate in its most sacred ritual. It’s simply a matter of common decency.

Also, some of the mystics give some extremely explicit descriptions of hell. The Dialogue of St. Catherine of Sienna (available from TAN) is a good example of this. Perhaps your friend could benefit from learning about “the four principal torments of the damned.”"
[/font]


#15

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