HuffPost Interview with a Young Woman Who Is Becoming a Discalced Carmelite Nun


#26

The Browns have as much a chance of winning a single game as they do the Super Bowl.


#28

I wouldn’t be surprised if she will be living a more meaningful life than most other young people tbh.


#29

I think it is very very sad that you think these things about the cloistered life.

Cloistered religious life is the oldest form of religious life and has been treasured for centuries. Many, if not most of the saints were cloistered away for most of their lives. This sort of cloistered religious life goes back to even the Old Testament! Moses was cloistered away and was considered so holy that his face would glow with the magnificence God would leave behind. Even Jesus was cloistered away in the desert for 40 days. Why? In order to prepare Himself for His public ministry. Cloistered religious do it in order to prepare for Heaven.

The Desert Fathers were the original religious (if I’m correct) and marked this way of living in history. They knew that the world is your enemy. The world has nothing to offer. But you can offer the world something: prayer.

As Jesus told St. Faustina,

“My daughter, I want to instruct you on how you are to rescue souls through sacrifice and prayer. You will save more souls through prayer and suffering than will a missionary through his teachings and sermons alone. I want to see you as a sacrifice of living love, which only then carries weight before Me."

One desires to become cloistered in order to hear the voice of God because you cannot hear God in the busyness of this world. One also desires to become cloistered so that they can cultivate a perfect relationship with God, so that through prayer, God gives them peace and happiness being with Him. It is much easier to reach the last Interior Castle by being a cloistered religious, which is the Mystical Marriage.


#31

:face_with_raised_eyebrow:

I think your “brimming with possibilities” is really, really odd.

No matter what I did or how long I lived with my background, my education, my ability to earn money, I never would have earned enough to travel extensively or do crazy things that are so often considered “possibility.”

Now that I have a family I give them everything. My “possibilities” include poopy diaper, poopy dog poo, and an overall chance of spit up, throw up or pee messes on a regular basis.

I chose this life and I dare anyone to pity me for it. I love being a mom. I even love my part-time job. My life isn’t easy, but it’s my choice…and I’m happy.

If you think that most people are anything more than irrelevent or meaningless to most of society, you must not get out much.


#32

Well, considering that, according to statistics, the average age of a U S nun is 74, it’s probably good that these Orders still have some young women interested in joining. Also, statistically speaking, there are about 50,000 nuns in the U.S. (down from 180,000 in the early 1960’s) with about 2,500 leaving the convent every year for a normal life. So, again, it’s good for these groups that at least some people are still interested in signing on. I just hope their is someone keeping this young woman company in the convent when she gets into her 70’s and 80’s. Hopefully, they will have not shut off the lights or turned the place into a museum. Perhaps they will have moved to Africa where the Catholic business seems to be booming!


#34

But you continue to talk in circles. You keep lamenting for her things she does not want for herself.

It’s bizarre.

Just because you don’t agree with her, you seem to find it easy to see everything else as really great…that she’s somehow throwing away opportunity.

But here’s the thing. She’s not.

You seem to be fixated on the idea of being able to pass this off as her cheating herself somehow.

Perhaps this is a case of “the lady doth protest too much?”


#35

Please see next response.


#36

FJ20002m
I think you are misreading this person’s (TrBe21) comments. He thinks she may someday regret her decision to enter a cloistered convent, but still wishes her well. Sort of like the father who may not like the unemployed, tattooed, 300 pound, long haired, biker-type that his daughter is marrying, but has the good sense to keep his mouth shut and still hope for the best!


#37

But the poster doesn’t know the woman in the Huff Post article.

She’s making assumptions, mostly based on misinformation and her own prejudices.

She’s basically trying to indicate that the lifestyle that the woman is choosing has no valid place in society…except for maybe with some crazy wierdos.

That’s not the case at all. There is nothing that is odd about it.

Heck, there were Shakers 100 years ago. They were basically a “Secular” somewhat cloistered community that took up residence in faraway mountains, were celibate and dedicated themselves to a craft.

The notion of “going away to prayer” is only bizarre in the context of our modern society. In many others it’s to be admired to the point where protestants/secularists copied it!!!


#38

Well, I agree with you about the Shakers. They were/are (only a few left) a noble religious sect.


#39

OK this is my take on this:

We are MADE to know, love and serve The Lord. We are MADE for Heaven. We cannot really rest and be at peace until we are with Him.

Now when someone chooses a cloistered life (NOT criticizing the active religious life at all, needed very much) they have NO worries but how they are serving God—no bills, no clock to punch, no spouse or children to worry about, no worry about what you will eat or wear or anything worldly, usually no possessions to accumulate or have to worry about, no worry about having insurance or retirement or a bank account of any kind. Imagine how FREEING that is. You just live without the burden of the world’s worries. Imagine your life being spent in prayer, worship, adoration and praising your Creator. 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for God, nothing else. What could be better than that. You are cared for in a community & help care for a community of ladies (or gentlemen) who are there for the same reasons as you are and you’re all in 100% for God. You ONLY care about how you are serving God (as well by serving the others in your community). Your entire life is knowing, loving, serving God. The Lord is your spouse. This is your life. What JOY! What PEACE! What complete fullness. Nothing sad about this at all. Actually it is a very BEAUTIFUL life.


#40

Well, they were just the most notable and successful “chastity and simplicity for the sake of…whatever” community. There were many smaller ones that tried.

But you have Tibetan monks and other sorts of isolationist “call to prayer for a higher power” things going on, too.

Basically, what I’m saying is that in the scope of humanity, a call in the heart or a draw towards total–or near total–isolation is not really that strange. At all.


#41

A beautiful story. May God and Our Lady keep this young woman. I believe the graces that are won for our sick world by holy souls like hers are unfathomable. This is the total offering of a soul out of pure love solely for Christ. What consolation this must bring to Him Who is so often neglected and shown indifference.

Veni sponsa Christi accipe coronam quam tibi dominus praeparavit in aeternum.


#42

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