huh...I have come to realize I can no longer be a protestant


#1

So whom am I? I have been an “evangelical Christian” for my whole life. Over the last few years I have felt very much out of place in evangelicalism all together, it has been as if something just wasn’t right. As of the past couple months, I have my evangelical world view became completely disillusioned with itself and I can seriously no longer call myself an evangelical, because we have no foundations whatsoever.

This has been aided by my classes certainly. I do go to an evangelical school in North America, where I am a theology major and will be graduating in December. My theological studies have centered mostly on historical theology where I have been deeply influenced by two professors who have taught me about the Church Fathers, and how they can still be evangelicals, I have no idea. So anyway, they have gotten me immersed in the Fathers and I seemed to finally find that which was missing in my Christian life, and that is the beauty and necessity of Tradition. How anyone can function without it, I do not have the slightest idea and I fear it will be the ultimate downfall of evangelicalism as it becomes more and more disillusioned with itself.

I hope to at least explore Catholicism now and see where my journey takes me.


#2

well, let me be the first to welcome you to the family, if you do decide to become catholic. i’m sure you’ll find a lot of helpful info on this website, and i would definitly suggest speaking with a priest too; they’re always great at explaining things. good luck!


#3

I sincerely hope your studies are fruitful. I suggest that you look up the writings of Cardinal Henry Newman who also found himself starting to study the Catholic Church as a result of studying the Early Church Fathers. I also highly recommend the works of Scott Hahn.

If you have come to this forum as part of your investigation of Catholicism, I have one word of advice for you. Check up on everything you see posted here that claims to be Catholic teaching. If you have not already done so, go out and get a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church (2nd Edition) and a Catholic version of the Bible. (I personally like the Ignatius Bible (Revised Standard Version - Catholic Edition). I would also highly recommend a three volume set titled, “The Faith of the Early Fathers” edited by William Jurgens. This set contains the most commonly cited passages of the Early Fathers (and many not so commonly cited) with an excellent doctrinal index.

You should also start discussing things with a priest. Don’t hesistate to go to the parish office about this.

Be assured of many prayers on your behalf by the members of this forum and I ask you to join us in our prayers for our new pope, Benedict XVI and continued prayers for the soul of John Paul II.


#4

[quote=jasonfin]My theological studies have centered mostly on historical theology where I have been deeply influenced by two professors who have taught me about the Church Fathers, and how they can still be evangelicals, I have no idea.
[/quote]

An example of Cardinal Newman’s conclusions. To become familiar with the Early Church is to cease to be a Protestant. (His “Apologia” was an explanation of how his attempt to prove the historical claims of the Anglican church resulted in his conversion to Catholicism.)


#5

Card. Newman…My theology profs refer to him continually. I am going to read him more this summer.

Thanks. I will visit a parish sometime soon. I am in the middle of final papers and exams right now. It’s weird, I am studying theology at a protetsant school where the majority of my studies centers on Patristics.

Yes, I am always quick to clarify anything I read when it comes to doctrine.


#6

:wave: :wave: Welcome:) May God be with you in your search for His Church:) Pssst!I wasn’t always Catholic;)


#7

You might want to take a look at Tim Staples and read his story. He came from an Assemblies of God background and converted in a pretty long process. It is pretty interesting and insightful.
Do you have the three early Church Father books by Jurgens? They are pretty comprehensive.
God Bless on your faith journey.

This website can give you good insight on the Catholic Church from a Protestant perspective.

chnetwork.org/

Scylla


#8

Welcome Jasofin, welcome to the Church


#9

Welcome! God bless you. There are a lot of resources available today to help. Especially the Catechism of the Catholic Church, one of John Paul II’s great accomplishments. It is a summary of the faith.

Another place to get help is the Coming Home Network. Maybe you have seen its founder, Marcus Grodi, who has a Monday evening program on EWTN called Journey Home. He works with ministers and other non Catholics who are seeking information about the Catholic Church. He was a Presbyterian minister.

Mary, the mother of Our Redeemer, is a mother ever ready to help us. I will ask her to pray for you. Callie

P. S. Good luck in your studies and exams.


#10

and another thing- if you do end up becoming catholic, it usually is more meaningful for converts than someone who has been catholic their whole life because it was something they sought out and had to work for. that’s what a convert told me once.


#11

Welcome!

You are now where I was 18 months ago. Hopefully a year from now you’ll be where I am now–newly confirmed :smiley:

DaveBj


#12

I am a religion major at a Presbyterian school…I hear what you are saying loud and clear.Read some of my posts and you can see that with just a little common sense and the ability to read, you too can come to love and embrace the Catholic Church.

DU


#13

[quote=jasonfin]So whom am I? I have been an “evangelical Christian” for my whole life. Over the last few years I have felt very much out of place in evangelicalism all together, it has been as if something just wasn’t right. As of the past couple months, I have my evangelical world view became completely disillusioned with itself and I can seriously no longer call myself an evangelical, because we have no foundations whatsoever.

This has been aided by my classes certainly. I do go to an evangelical school in North America, where I am a theology major and will be graduating in December. My theological studies have centered mostly on historical theology where I have been deeply influenced by two professors who have taught me about the Church Fathers, and how they can still be evangelicals, I have no idea. So anyway, they have gotten me immersed in the Fathers and I seemed to finally find that which was missing in my Christian life, and that is the beauty and necessity of Tradition. How anyone can function without it, I do not have the slightest idea and I fear it will be the ultimate downfall of evangelicalism as it becomes more and more disillusioned with itself.

I hope to at least explore Catholicism now and see where my journey takes me.
[/quote]

i for one am glad your done protesting… Welcome:D


#14

It has got to be a bit of a scary and unsettling time for you. I once spoke at an RCIA class and some of the converts there expressed some apprehension because for years they had heard so many misconceptions about Catholics and what we believed.

My statement to them was that we are not some off the wall cult or fly by night faith that suddenly sprang out of the wood work. We have been around for almost 2000 years. The same faith as practiced by the early Christians is done almost the same way now. You will NOT be giving up your bible and you will NOT be giving up Jesus.

What you will be giving up is some false notions of what you may have thought Catholicism was all about. And what you will be gaining is the rich traditions of the Church, its sacraments, AND an understanding of how Mary and the Holy Spirit have led souls to her divine Son for hundreds of years.

As one of those converts says, being in the Catholic Chruch is like getting to Heaven in a luxury ocean liner, going at it as Protestant is like crossing the ocean in a row boat.

One of the recent homilies in our parish quoted Justinian from the second century. It spoke about the real presence of Jesus in the Holy Eucharist. He said that he believes in the actual change of the bread and wine into the body and blood of Jesus Christ simply because Jesus told that to His Apostles. AND as a matter of faith he believes EVERYTHING that Jesus says.

Here is a belief passed on by word of mouth for 2000 years that the Church still hold true today. That is pretty awesome.

What is not understandable is that many protestants do not believe this, yet even John Calvin and Martin Luther accepted the real presence as fact. Reformers really have to question their legitimacy, when their own founders disagree with their current philosophy.

Christ’s Peace, wc


#15

[quote=jasonfin]So whom am I? I have been an “evangelical Christian” for my whole life. Over the last few years I have felt very much out of place in evangelicalism all together, it has been as if something just wasn’t right. As of the past couple months, I have my evangelical world view became completely disillusioned with itself and I can seriously no longer call myself an evangelical, because we have no foundations whatsoever.

This has been aided by my classes certainly. I do go to an evangelical school in North America, where I am a theology major and will be graduating in December. My theological studies have centered mostly on historical theology where I have been deeply influenced by two professors who have taught me about the Church Fathers, and how they can still be evangelicals, I have no idea. So anyway, they have gotten me immersed in the Fathers and I seemed to finally find that which was missing in my Christian life, and that is the beauty and necessity of Tradition. How anyone can function without it, I do not have the slightest idea and I fear it will be the ultimate downfall of evangelicalism as it becomes more and more disillusioned with itself.

I hope to at least explore Catholicism now and see where my journey takes me.
[/quote]

Welcome and may the peace of Christ be with you.
Don’t fear the downfall of evangelicalism, Christ said, “And I have other sheep, that are not of this fold; I must bring them also, and they will heed my voice. So there shall be one flock, one shepherd.” Jn 10:16. In Gods’ good time there the Church will be once again united as it was in the first 1000 years and there shall be one flock and one shepard.

May the love of God, the peace of Jesus Christ, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you always.

God Bless


#16

I also came into the Church after I began to study Christian history and I came to the conclusion that my Baptist background (and then-current “non-denominational” evangelical church) had a very short history…

As you noticed, when you read the early church fathers, there’s not a direct line to any of the protestant churches. In most cases, there isn’t even an indirect line. Most of them popped up out of nothing with only a fragment of the full truth… This is the conclusion I came to. For a while I thought I might go back to my non-denom church on occasion. After all, they have an amazing music program and good “inspirational talks”… (sometimes called sermons, but this church was all about the feel-good talks!) Well, I haven’t and at this point have no plans to. What I do have the desire for is to attend mass as many times as possible!!!

May God bless you on your journey. It can be tough… really tough. I had a few things to overcome, but lots of reading and praying did the trick. Don’t rely on an RCIA program, necessarily (though you will have to go through that if you decide to become Catholic). Obviously you’re a scholarly person and will want to read lots of books. There’s some amazing testimonies from former evangelicals and former evangelical pastors. Scott Hahn (already mentioned) is probably the most prominent and quite possibly one of the smartest Christian theologians of our time. Highly recommended.

God bless,

Michael


#17

[quote=jasonfin]Card. Newman…My theology profs refer to him continually. I am going to read him more this summer.

Thanks. I will visit a parish sometime soon. I am in the middle of final papers and exams right now. It’s weird, I am studying theology at a protetsant school where the majority of my studies centers on Patristics.

Yes, I am always quick to clarify anything I read when it comes to doctrine.
[/quote]

Read Newman’s Apologia pro Vita Sua. I was an Anglican, and I bawled my way through it. Wait until you get to the snapdragons! You are on a beautiful road, but do not expect it to be without tears. Buckets of tears.


#18

[quote=LoneRanger]i for one am glad your done protesting… Welcome:D
[/quote]

I was never protesting anything, thoguh I know what you mean.
I grew up an evangelicl and I still have a lot of people I deeply love and care for who are evangelicals. I do like to protest against evangeliclaism though, oh yeah, I really do!!!

[quote=] It has got to be a bit of a scary and unsettling time for you.
[/quote]

Maybe. I am not upset or disturbed. Maybe I will be some time, but whatever. I haev enough of a base in historical theology that I woule be more disturbed to keep quiet and not say anything.


#19

Cardinal Newman once said, “To know history is to cease being Protestant.” Or something like that, I see it on EWTN alot.


#20

I know you said that you were going through finals so I don’t expect you to have much time to read these now. Since you are looking into Catholic teaching, I thought I’d give you links to other threads in which I have participated with other Protestants asking about Catholic beliefs.

I hope you find them helpful.

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=5393

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=6805

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=17067


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