"Hunger Games" a "Catholic novel"?

These stories of those who face incredible hardship and do not shirk in the face of death, but instead fully rely on God, are the true heroes. It takes a lot to say that you are not strong enough, and only God is.

Amen to that! :thumbsup:

The true hero in a novel must rely on God? What if, in the story, he or she doesn’t know there is a God and the author says nothing about God?

Aren’t there “Catholic novels” (stories that present the truth of sin, grace, and redemption) that make no mention of Catholicism?

Does a “Catholic novel” also have to be a catechism story? Then again, can a catechism story be a good novel, one that does more than preach to the choir?

For my personal heroees, who mostly consist of saints, Christ himself, and Godly people in my life, they do rely on God.

It is the fact that all earthly heroes (fictional and “real life”) do have faults. And I prefer the hero that relies on God in times where their faults get the best of them - and in good times, as well.

Not that there are not great characters who do show good qualities - there are! -(Katniss, for example), but we were just saying that we like it when the character finds strength in God, making them a truly great example.

The true hero in a novel must rely on God? What if, in the story, he or she doesn’t know there is a God and the author says nothing about God?

It depends on the author’s objective.
In The Hunger Games, Collins wanted Katniss to be a hero, and she succeeded. Katniss is definitely a hero. But do you like the girl? I find it hard to like her.

In my novel, Theresa is both a hero and likeable, because she clearly does what she does because of her respect for a higher power.

When a book reader or movie viewer finds himself liking a character he wants to know everything about that character that made her what she is. That includes religion. A Muslim Theresa might be loved in the Muslim world, but would bomb in the West.

Aren’t there “Catholic novels” (stories that present the truth of sin, grace, and redemption) that make no mention of Catholicism?

My novel does the opposite. :smiley: It mentions that Theresa is Catholic but doesn’t mention a single Catholic dogma, or any religious doctrine for that matter. Some alien from Mars would have no idea what she believes in, but most people will have some idea, as I intended.

Does a “Catholic novel” also have to be a catechism story? Then again, can a catechism story be a good novel, one that does more than preach to the choir?

You may have seen the movie The Robe, starring Richard Burton as a Roman centurion who is assigned to crucify Christ, and later defends Christiantiy while on trial before Caligula.
I read the book, written by a Methodist minister. It was on the New York Times bestseller list for nine months, a blockbuster! It was full of Protestant style preaching. Even I was annoyed with it.
The movie producers wisely dropped the preaching and concentrated on the action ( a lot of which was NOT in the book! :eek: ) The movie was a blockbuster.
So I guess the answer to your question is yes, a religiously oriented story can be written without preaching.

LaMusicaSenior wrote.

It is the fact that all earthly heroes (fictional and “real life”) do have faults. And I prefer the hero that relies on God in times where their faults get the best of them - and in good times, as well.

In my novel, Theresa’s faults, if she has any, are never mentioned. The problems she deals with do not involve sin. Furthermore, to succeed in her challenges, she must perform perfectly in the secular sense.

As British Prime Minister Blair tells the House of Commons, Theresa was “chosen” because she is prefectly suited for her mission.

( Now there’s a challenge! :blush: Write a story about a character who has no faults and is completely effective ! :bigyikes: Even Shakespeare didn’t do that. :cool: )


After 600 years of combing through the mountains of comtemporary documentation about Joan of Arc, historians have found not faulty in her character. :thumbsup:

Just wanted to throw this out there, but do I like the girl? Absolutely.

Just as I like people in real life who are trying hard to be good people but who do not believe in God. They are still good people and they are still likeable.

[quote]
Originally Posted by empther

forums.catholic.com/images/buttons_khaki/viewpost.gif
*It depends on the author’s objective. *
In The Hunger Games, Collins wanted Katniss to be a hero, and she succeeded. Katniss is definitely a hero. But do you like the girl? I find it hard to like her.

Just wanted to throw this out there, but do I like the girl? Absolutely.

Just as I like people in real life who are trying hard to be good people but who do not believe in God. They are still good people and they are still likeable.

[/quote]

Some people like Katniss and some don’t. It’s a free country.

We’ll see if Jennifer Lawrence wins an Oscar for the role.
I’m betting she doesn’t. The Academy usually goes for a character everybody likes.

I liked Katness in the movie :slight_smile:

I have to agree. Brian Jacques (author of Redwall Series) would be a somewhat similar example. Although he tackles many moral issues in abstract ways, his novels aren’t specifically Catholic other than the fact that the main characters live in an abbey.

Suzanne Collins first wrote the series “Gregor the Overlander” which is for 8-12 years olds and it deals with some heavy issues that come up in war. While writing those books for much younger children she explores concepts like biological warfare and also the fact that both sides do morally questionable actions. That the “good guys” aren’t immune to doing bad things especially in war where it is easy to do the wrong thing with the right intention. While writing these novels, there are 5, she decided she wanted to write more novels about war but for older teens. That way she could explore darker and heavier topics.

Often times you see battle and war being glorified. Think about how many movies there are with “bad guys” and “good guys” and the good guys kill the bad while we cheer them on? She wanted to write a story where kids saw that violence and war are not something to be desired, not something to enjoy and revel in.

Take Lord of The Rings for instance, the good characters are most definitely good, and the orcs are easy to indentify as being bad. So when the main characters kill large numbers, even making a game of counting the kills and trying to best each other, we cheer them on. In the real world, in war, we aren’t fighting orcs. We’d be fighting other human beings with hopes and dreams and family and friends, and that is not something we should excitedly look forward too. That being a hero is not about killing the bad guys, but about sacrificing ourselves for others and protecting those we care about.

I never said it wasn’t. I was just throwing out another opinion to help balance the ideas in this thread. My emphasis was not to imply that you need to like Katniss, just to imply how much I like her as a character (granted, I’m not just going off of the movie, I have read the books too).

:thumbsup:

Katniss is a bit meaner in the books.

What actually got me to read the Hunger Games was Fr Barron’s review of the Hunger Games on youtube:

youtube.com/watch?v=RsFBbS39_z0

And his additional commentary video on Hunter Games:

youtube.com/watch?v=VpCowqg_pHI

What is interesting to note is that Fr Barron notices in the second video is that the mention of God is completely absent in the books. He correlates that with what society is capable of when God is removed from people’s lives.

Yeah, they are actually on my list of things to read very soon. You could tell from the movie they were glossing over lots of stuff and I want to know what it is! :wink:

I watched the movie first…and I truthfully like the movie more :stuck_out_tongue:

I normally don’t say that about novel adaptations. The book just seemed to have a lot of unnecessary events, though learning more about the districts and tributes was interesting.

From what I’ve heard, the books in the Hunger Games series are called “mommy porn”. I am hoping that I’ve heard wrong.

Your thinking of “Fifty Shades of Grey” which is indeed pornography.

Really?
Thanks for the clarification. :slight_smile:

Empther

Now there’s a challenge! Write a story about a character who has no faults and is completely effective !

It’s been done already, about some bloke who lived about two thousand years ago. The best stories of course been the most true ones.

Blair has not been prime minister for some years now. British prime ministers are not referenced as a prime minister once they leave that office. unlike American presidents who I know retrain the courtesy title of president.

I don’t think Logans run…Er i mean the Running man…doh! I mean i don’t think the hunger games is a Catholic novel

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