Hypoallergenic dogs


#1

Are hypoallergenic dogs ethical/moral to own? It seems that they are ‘made to order’- bread to be suitable in other words. I could be wrong in how they’re bread though. I suppose if they’re bread like other dogs, pure breads for example, they’d be ethical to own, right?

Is it ethical to own one? I’m curious :slight_smile:

Thank you,
Coolduude


#2

Yes, they are moral to own. Why in the world wouldn't they be?


#3

[quote="Rascalking, post:2, topic:237187"]
Yes, they are moral to own. Why in the world wouldn't they be?

[/quote]

I was under the impression they were 'genetically engineered' to not produce allergens. I guess they're not? :o

Thank you for the answer :)


#4

No they’re not, they’re just dogs who apparently shed less dander than other dogs. But they may still trigger reactions, just less than other breeds.

By the way, its breed/bred not BREADS. When it comes to bread I prefer seeded, by the way.


#5

:thumbsup:

This is crucial to remember. Many people who are allergic can have hypoallergenic dogs, but they’re not for everyone.

I have a Bichon (hypoallergenic) but I also have a boxer and a pug-I’m not allergic to dogs (thank God, I cannot imagine my life without my dogs) but I DO have a friend who is-she is fine around my Bichon, but if she gets close to my pug and boxer, she gets sneezy.


#6

[quote="LemonAndLime, post:4, topic:237187"]

By the way, its breed/bred not BREADS. When it comes to bread I prefer seeded, by the way.

[/quote]

I knew it looked funny :o Sorry :( :p


#7

first, there is no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog or a non-shedding dog (both terms are often used to mean the same thing).

people can either be allergic to proteins the dog produces (found in fur, dander, urine, and saliva) or to other allergens the dog picks up and carries around in its fur. individual dogs produce different levels of protein, but there is no breed where is can be guaranteed that every dog will have a level below that at which someone will be allergic to.

as far as not shedding goes, just think about that for a second - if the dog never shed, it would end up with huge mats of fur that just kept getting larger and larger and larger. I'm not really sure how people can believe this one.. :shrug:

generally speaking, long haired animals will pick up and carry around more foreign allergens, and short spiky fur is more likely to aggravate the skin of allergic individuals. also, dogs that never get bathed are more likely to cause allergies, no matter what the breed, as the allergens have a chance to build up.

so yes, there are certain breeds that are tend to produce individuals that are less likely to aggravate human allergies, but it is not guaranteed and they are not truly hypoallergenic.

now that I've gotten that out of the way..

all breeds came about because of selective breeding. some breeds are significantly older than others, but they were all bred for specific traits. so breeding, in and of itself, is not unethical.

the problem arises when you have people who don't care about the health of their animals or about how many they're churning out that will end up being killed in shelters. they are out to make as much money as possible. these are the places pet stores get their dogs from. these are what most of the puppies being sold in the paper are products of. "backyard breeders" and "puppy mills" are real problems that are very often overlooked because hey, puppies are cute, and the consumer doesn't see the conditions they were born in.

personally, I have a major problem with so - called "designer dogs" (labradoodles, cockapoos, etc) because that's exactly what they are. they are made-to-order mutts. people will spend up to a thousand bucks on one of these mutts when there are plenty available at the local shelter. the gimmick is that the breed is "hypoallergenic" or "has the good qualities of both parent breeds" but in reality there is no way to guarantee either, especially from early generation mixes.

let's use humans as an analogy. imagine a family with lots of children. do we expect them to all have identical physical characteristics? do we expect them to all have identical temperments (emotional characteristics)? of course not. there is absolutely no reason we should expect that from a mixed breed dog, either. even good breeders - of breeds that have been around for hundreds of years, where you would think all the undesirable stuff has been bred out - will end up with individual animals that do not meet breed standards for physical and or emotional traits. genetics, man..

although I respect that good breeders work hard to preserve the breed's bloodline, for most people there is no need to buy a dog. honestly, I think the only people who have any business going to a breeder for a purebred are those who still use the breed for what it was intended to do (police work, hunting, etc). there are breed specific rescue organizations for those who only want one particular type, and there are enough out there in shelters (yes, purebreds end up in shelters, too). there is no need to cause the creation of more animals that will just end up suffering or killed.

sorry if this post sounds harsh, but I've found that too many people just aren't aware of how many awful breeders are out there and how many animals are killed in shelters each year. many people use "I got my dog from a breeder" as a status symbol, too. :( it's not like buying a car, it's a living creature! seeing this stuff firsthand makes me very sad. :(


#8

No idea what you mean by a hypoallergenic dog. We have many serious allergies in my family and own two poodles. Since they naturally don’t shed, we don’t have allergy problems with them. Poodles breeds have been around a long time, we bought one from a breeder because he wasn’t ‘show quality’ and got one from a rescue.

Edit to respond to post above: Poodles really don’t shed the same way other dogs do. Their hair (not fur) really does just grow longer and longer and yes, can become very matted. That is why grooming poodles is so important. If a dog owner can afford to get the dog groomed or figure out how to do it themselves, they and their poodle will be very unhappy.


#9

[quote="coolduude, post:6, topic:237187"]
I knew it looked funny :o Sorry :( :p

[/quote]

It's okay :thumbsup: I'm dyslexic so I make mistakes like this all the time, don't worry - it gave me a giggle. :p


#10

we bought one from a breeder because he wasn't 'show quality' and got one from a rescue.

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

(your dog does shed, though.. just much less noticeable ;))


#11

Don’t shed? Are you seriously telling me that you never find any dog hairs around your house? Or that if you brushed them the brush would be clean?

As someone has already said, all dogs shed. But people with dog allergies aren’t allergic to every single dog.


#12

all this talk of dogs, I'm gonna go give my doggy a big hug now, hehe :D


#13

Yes, but the way people ‘shed’, not at all the way other breeds of dog do. I am not the one with the allergies so we had dogs when I was growing up and I can tell you there is a HUGE difference between the way even an ordinary shorthair dog sheds and the way a poodle sheds.:slight_smile:


#14

Have you swept up behind a shepard? Or a lab? if so, you’d understand the HUGE difference. :smiley:


#15

There may be a huge difference, but they DO shed, and you said they didn’t. :stuck_out_tongue:

My parents own a terrier who has wirey/tough short hair. He sheds very little also, but he definitely still does.


#16

Do you mean the allegedly hypoallergenic dogs and cats marketing by a company called Lifestyle Pets, the outfit that sold the $20,000 felines?

If you are you don’t need to worry about the morality of it because they’re no longer in business. The owners ran afoul of legitimate cat fanciers and closed shop. They went on, if I remember right, to start a rent-a-pet company in NYC, which also now has closed up shop. Rightly so, I might add.

And no, all purebred animals are not bred ethically. Puppy mills and all that. Four months ago we adopted a purebred Siamese kitten who was surrendered to a shelter when her breeder, a cattery owner, dumper the remainders of a litter she couldn’t sell. The kitten was one of three survivors, the rest were too sick to save, and is permanently blind because of an untreated parasitic infection she had when she went to the shelter. According to our vet, professional cat and dog breeders routinely use the SPCA to dump animals that are no longer profitable.


#17

There are differences.

I had Llhasa Apso’s growing up, and they shed in clumps. So every now and then you just find this big fur ball to pick up and throw out. No biggie.

I had another breed that was also small that shed like fur was going out of style. Hair EVERYWHERE! And not clumps - little hairs all over the place!

Even for long after my last dog passed away I was finding hairs! :eek:


#18

[quote="insideitall, post:7, topic:237187"]
first, there is no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog or a non-shedding dog (both terms are often used to mean the same thing).

people can either be allergic to proteins the dog produces (found in fur, dander, urine, and saliva) or to other allergens the dog picks up and carries around in its fur. individual dogs produce different levels of protein, but there is no breed where is can be guaranteed that every dog will have a level below that at which someone will be allergic to.

as far as not shedding goes, just think about that for a second - if the dog never shed, it would end up with huge mats of fur that just kept getting larger and larger and larger. I'm not really sure how people can believe this one.. :shrug:

generally speaking, long haired animals will pick up and carry around more foreign allergens, and short spiky fur is more likely to aggravate the skin of allergic individuals. also, dogs that never get bathed are more likely to cause allergies, no matter what the breed, as the allergens have a chance to build up.

so yes, there are certain breeds that are tend to produce individuals that are less likely to aggravate human allergies, but it is not guaranteed and they are not truly hypoallergenic.

now that I've gotten that out of the way..

all breeds came about because of selective breeding. some breeds are significantly older than others, but they were all bred for specific traits. so breeding, in and of itself, is not unethical.

the problem arises when you have people who don't care about the health of their animals or about how many they're churning out that will end up being killed in shelters. they are out to make as much money as possible. these are the places pet stores get their dogs from. these are what most of the puppies being sold in the paper are products of. "backyard breeders" and "puppy mills" are real problems that are very often overlooked because hey, puppies are cute, and the consumer doesn't see the conditions they were born in.

personally, I have a major problem with so - called "designer dogs" (labradoodles, cockapoos, etc) because that's exactly what they are. they are made-to-order mutts. people will spend up to a thousand bucks on one of these mutts when there are plenty available at the local shelter. the gimmick is that the breed is "hypoallergenic" or "has the good qualities of both parent breeds" but in reality there is no way to guarantee either, especially from early generation mixes.

let's use humans as an analogy. imagine a family with lots of children. do we expect them to all have identical physical characteristics? do we expect them to all have identical temperments (emotional characteristics)? of course not. there is absolutely no reason we should expect that from a mixed breed dog, either. even good breeders - of breeds that have been around for hundreds of years, where you would think all the undesirable stuff has been bred out - will end up with individual animals that do not meet breed standards for physical and or emotional traits. genetics, man..

although I respect that good breeders work hard to preserve the breed's bloodline, for most people there is no need to buy a dog. honestly, I think the only people who have any business going to a breeder for a purebred are those who still use the breed for what it was intended to do (police work, hunting, etc). there are breed specific rescue organizations for those who only want one particular type, and there are enough out there in shelters (yes, purebreds end up in shelters, too). there is no need to cause the creation of more animals that will just end up suffering or killed.

sorry if this post sounds harsh, but I've found that too many people just aren't aware of how many awful breeders are out there and how many animals are killed in shelters each year. many people use "I got my dog from a breeder" as a status symbol, too. :( it's not like buying a car, it's a living creature! seeing this stuff firsthand makes me very sad. :(

[/quote]

:thumbsup::thumbsup:Great post. No you are not being harsh but just telling as it is. Many people are not aware or do not want to know the horrible realities.

Just a small point, my toy poodle (adopted from Americans who were leaving) does not shed. His fur just gets longer and curls up to look like wool. I comb it out regularly but that only smoothens it. However since allergens are in dander too, have no idea if such a breed helps someone with allergies.


#19

It looks as if we are to go by inside tail's post then yes, hypoallergenic dogs ('designer dogs') are in fact immoral to own. However, some other users disagree. So now I just don't know :p :shrug:


#20

All domestic animals are “designer” types. That is, they were forced to breed by humans to bring out characteristics that humans wanted. Essentially, we took a natural animal and created an artificial selective environment to enslave the animal for our benefit…

This is possibly why people are so cruel to animals: if it is no longer convenient for them, why bother? It only exists to serve them, after all.

If you are going to become educated about the breed, take very good care of the animal, have it spade or neutered so it does not produce unwanted offspring or have to suffer through heats, if you will respect it, help it engage in activities that it needs for a healthy animal mind, that is: if you will love your dog or other animal in the Christian sense of the word meaning: something you do - then rescuing a domestic animal from a shelter or a family who doesn’t want it, is a great thing.

If you just want to entertain your kids, buy 'em an xBox.


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