I became Catholic, my husband didn't


#1

I converted to Catholicism from secularism about 3 years ago. My husband is a fallen away Catholic who considers himself a Muslim, because he doesn’t believe Jesus is God. He seems to have mentally disengaged from our relationship. Any converts have similar experiences?


#2

How long have you been married? And how did your husband make the jump from God to Allah?? That is a huge change.

This is going to be a hard one. Islam isn’t known for its tolerance of other religions between a husband and wife.


#3

We've been married 9 years, he was raised Catholic, his mother never went to Church and left it over annulment issues when he was a teenager and joined a Baptist Church, and he became Baptist too, and after that was confirmed in the Catholic Church even though he was a practicing Baptist. Later he read the Bible, decided it was full of contradictions, and that he personally didn't think the Trinity made any sense, and that he didn't believe Jesus was God. So he I guess he found something that teaches the Bible is corrupt, the Trinity is pagan and Jesus isn't God and so that's what he believes now. And he won't listen to anyone else.


#4

I wonder how he ever got confirmed? That's amazing. He's had quite a history with religion hasn't he? Not a good one, unfortunately.

Would he read anything about Jesus? Like "The Case for Christ?" That's a really good book written by someone who was an atheist but proved to himself that Jesus really was the Son of God.

Does your husband want a divorce? Is he going to attend a mosque and convert to Islam for real? Or has he already?:eek:


#5

I think his family just goes through the motions to deceive the grandparents. His cousin's daughter just received first communion in a Catholic Church and they go to a pentecostal church. They all go through the motions of receiving the Sacraments, but they don't believe they have to do anything the Church tells them they should.

I could ask him to read a book, but he probably wouldn't. He says his brain just shuts off when he hears anything about Jesus being God and he doesn't hear anything else. He said I am not allowed to try to convert him and he would get angry with me if he thought I was. He converted first. Coming from a non-religious background I didn't really care and he pretty much just acts like any secular person. He doesn't want a divorce or anything, but since I became Catholic it's just like he isn't interested in anything I say or think or any of my interests or anything I do. I tried to talk to him about his religion and he used to talk about it but not anymore. It's like we just don't really have a friendship and can't work as a team. We are both in it for the long haul, but there is kind of a disconnect. He feels like we love each other, and I feel like I love him, but he doesn't even know me or want to. He has never even asked me why I became Catholic.


#6

I am so sorry - as much as I hate to say this to you the best I can offer is that you pray for the intercession of St Monica. Maybe you can find some things such as the apologetics book on this site about Islam and just leave it out. He may read it and he may no but the information will be available. God bless you for returning home. Remember that God gives us Crosses that we may not always understand but how we live the Gospel is sometimes the best example of the Bible someone may have.


#7

Actually Muslim men can marry Catholic/Christian or Jewish women and have to be respective of their faith. If he thinks he is now a Muslim he needs to learn what the Religion teaches.

Of course it sounds like he really hasn't truly learned what any of his religious endeavors have taught.

I almost fell into Arius' heresy at one time in my life to but I hung to my Presbyterian faith and prayed that God would help me answer all these questions in time. He did, I found those answers in the teachings of the Catholic Church.

He has probably been mixed up for years hearing baptist dispensationalism mixed with Covenant Theology plus the anti-Catholic rantings of some fundies. My suggestion would be to try to encourage him prove to himself why Catholicism is wrong since that was the Faith he initially accepted. He probably has a lot to learn.

There is a good book call "Born Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic" which is a good starter on the comparisons if he went to a fundamentalist Church for a while. Scott Hahn's Home Sweet Rome is a good starter as well.

Joe


#8

There are two issues happening here. One is the religious divide between you and his unwillingness to discuss faith. The other is the loss of closeness/friendship. Certainly they affect each other, but you can work on one while setting aside the other if need be. It sounds like he is refusing to attend to the faith aspect of your relationship, so I would suggest working on the other side. I'm betting that since you were not religious when you fell in love with him, you used to have things in common, interests that bonded you, that weren't related to religion. Heck, even really religious people have some secular interests. Why not go back to those things and rekindle those interests. Pray for him. Perhaps someday he will be open to having non-threatening conversations about his and your faith. But until then, show him your love by nurturing those things in your lives that either you still have in common, or that you can return to. If it needs to be said for him to go along say it. Let him know that you want to be close to him regardless of your faith differences, and that you want to work on your marriage/friendship in these other ways.


#9

[quote="OneAugustKnight, post:1, topic:219157"]
I converted to Catholicism from secularism about 3 years ago. My husband is a fallen away Catholic who considers himself a Muslim, because he doesn't believe Jesus is God. He seems to have mentally disengaged from our relationship. Any converts have similar experiences?

[/quote]

I'm pretty sure there's more to being a Muslim than believing Jesus isn't God. Otherwise Christopher Hitchens would be an Imam!:D


#10

[quote="ThyKingdomCome, post:8, topic:219157"]
There are two issues happening here. One is the religious divide between you and his unwillingness to discuss faith. The other is the loss of closeness/friendship. Certainly they affect each other, but you can work on one while setting aside the other if need be. It sounds like he is refusing to attend to the faith aspect of your relationship, so I would suggest working on the other side. I'm betting that since you were not religious when you fell in love with him, you used to have things in common, interests that bonded you, that weren't related to religion. Heck, even really religious people have some secular interests. Why not go back to those things and rekindle those interests. Pray for him. Perhaps someday he will be open to having non-threatening conversations about his and your faith. But until then, show him your love by nurturing those things in your lives that either you still have in common, or that you can return to. If it needs to be said for him to go along say it. Let him know that you want to be close to him regardless of your faith differences, and that you want to work on your marriage/friendship in these other ways.

[/quote]

Not to hijack the thread, but I have a similar problem. I guess as I grow in my faith, it seems to inform more and more of my life, and become more important. It's harder to find those things that hubby and I shared when we were both lapsed. I just am not that person any more. I have a really hard time separating out my Catholic-ness from my life, it's so important and so much a part of who I am. Thus, my faith crisis when I realized that so many Catholics voted for Obama...but I digress.

Sometimes it seems that the only thing hubby and I have in common is the kids. And even then, we disagree about what to teach them - I am 100% anti-birth control and he says he's practical and if sons are going to have sex they need protection. I guess it's time for me to start my own thread, eh?

I am "unequally yoked" to a man of the same religion as me!!! :(


#11

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:10, topic:219157"]
Not to hijack the thread, but I have a similar problem. I guess as I grow in my faith, it seems to inform more and more of my life, and become more important. It's harder to find those things that hubby and I shared when we were both lapsed. I just am not that person any more. I have a really hard time separating out my Catholic-ness from my life, it's so important and so much a part of who I am. Thus, my faith crisis when I realized that so many Catholics voted for Obama...but I digress.

Sometimes it seems that the only thing hubby and I have in common is the kids. And even then, we disagree about what to teach them - I am 100% anti-birth control and he says he's practical and if sons are going to have sex they need protection. I guess it's time for me to start my own thread, eh?

I am "unequally yoked" to a man of the same religion as me!!! :(

[/quote]

There's a few issues at play here and with the OP. Some of it has nothing to do with religion. If you were growing apart or not actively nurturing the relationship before one of you converted/reverted/got serious about your faith, the conversion is just one more factor at play. If youre love or relationship is really going to be conditioned on your partner sharing your beliefs, it's not really love. It's an arrangement.

There is room in a marriage for some deep differences of who people are. You can either respect each other's boundaries or not. That means not hard selling them/making them a target for constant conversion efforts. It means the less/non-religious partner doesn't make snide cracks about the deeply held convictions of the other one. Sometimes it means there are just certain topics and debates you don't bring up. I've been down this road, in a different sort of way. My wife and I were both ex-Catholics/secular when we met. I eventually became a pretty serious pagan, and still am. It caused a certain amount of stress/uncertainty, but we worked it out.

If other people's practices or voting records cause a crisis of faith, I would suggest you may be grounding your faith in the wrong things. No religion, no matter how dogmatic, runs like the Borg collective. People are individuals, and they come to their faith with varying levels of seriousness and different things which inform their consciousness. All you can do is keep your eye on the road of your own faith journey. I find as I get older there's a lot of work to do on oneself and precious little time in a human lifespan to do it. The fact that you, or I may consider ourselves to be exemplary practicioners of our respective religions does not make it so, nor does it justify appointing ourselves as God's Special Prosecutor. He/She/They are presumably quite able to act on their own behalf in that role....


#12

[quote="OneAugustKnight, post:1, topic:219157"]
I converted to Catholicism from secularism about 3 years ago. My husband is a fallen away Catholic who considers himself a Muslim, because he doesn't believe Jesus is God. He seems to have mentally disengaged from our relationship. Any converts have similar experiences?

[/quote]

yup. me. my husband was an athiest and an evulitionist before we married. we married at a civil wedding. i came back to the church a few years ago. my marriage was blessed in the church. my husband got conditionally baptized after going through catechism. 2 years later, he decided catholicism was not for him. he told me it was just an experiment. yes, ti hurt me really badly. he has also somewhat disconnected from me in the relationship to a point. we do not discuss religion anymore. he has an exceptionally negative attitude towards the Church after visiting apostate websites. i dont pray around him anymore. i do it in private when he is at work. satan almost ripped my marriage apart. but, i trusted in Jesus. and we are still married. the devil has a hold of my husbands soul believe me. he says terrible things about the Church and terrible things to me sometimes even when it comes to Jesus he has said sacreligious things. this is not something he did before he learned about Catholicism. he only started doing it when he got involved with a 20 year old girl and had a cyber affair. i found out about it, and soon after that he left the Church and started visiting terrible anti Catholic sites and spewed venom about the Church for a long time. i respectfully asked him numerous times not to talk about it in front of me. he started learning to respect my beliefs. i think its a miracle that we are still married. i did not want a divorce because i love him, and we decided to make it work. but to this day, he occasionally tried to spew some anti catholic venom at me,.he only does it when he is visiting anti catholic sites. i honestly dont know what that girl told him when he was cyber flirting with her. but it had an enormous impact on him. obviously. i have never seen anyone in my life spew such venom about the Church. God really has a lot of crosses for me to bear, and this is a mighty big one. iam greatful we dont argue. very.


#13

[quote="kenofken, post:11, topic:219157"]
There's a few issues at play here and with the OP. Some of it has nothing to do with religion. If you were growing apart or not actively nurturing the relationship before one of you converted/reverted/got serious about your faith, the conversion is just one more factor at play. If youre love or relationship is really going to be conditioned on your partner sharing your beliefs, it's not really love. It's an arrangement.

There is room in a marriage for some deep differences of who people are. You can either respect each other's boundaries or not. That means not hard selling them/making them a target for constant conversion efforts. It means the less/non-religious partner doesn't make snide cracks about the deeply held convictions of the other one. Sometimes it means there are just certain topics and debates you don't bring up. I've been down this road, in a different sort of way. My wife and I were both ex-Catholics/secular when we met. I eventually became a pretty serious pagan, and still am. It caused a certain amount of stress/uncertainty, but we worked it out.

If other people's practices or voting records cause a crisis of faith, I would suggest you may be grounding your faith in the wrong things. No religion, no matter how dogmatic, runs like the Borg collective. People are individuals, and they come to their faith with varying levels of seriousness and different things which inform their consciousness. All you can do is keep your eye on the road of your own faith journey. I find as I get older there's a lot of work to do on oneself and precious little time in a human lifespan to do it. The fact that you, or I may consider ourselves to be exemplary practicioners of our respective religions does not make it so, nor does it justify appointing ourselves as God's Special Prosecutor. He/She/They are presumably quite able to act on their own behalf in that role....

[/quote]

I never said I considered myself anyone's "Special Prosecutor." I was wondering how to work it out when my own faith is the most important aspect of who I am, and my husband has not experienced the same thing and remains mostly an atheist although he does attend Mass and takes the Eucharist. I have not pushed my beliefs on him but there is a wide gulf in how we approach life, which is not easy. I know that it must make me sound as if I am in possession of "the truth," because I am the one who is trying to follow God's will. but I am trying not to put that aspect of my life into my marriage. I just don't know how to do that.

As far as the other subject, it does trouble me greatly that such hypocrisy can go on within our Church. I was shocked by it. I just assumed that all Catholics were as committed to life as we should be. But let's not turn this thread into another political discussion, it's not relevant.

My problem is how to ignore such a large part of myself and still find enough in common with my non-religious husband? It bothers him too, it's not just me, I know he wonders what happened because it's ME who has changed so much since we got married. We'd have had zero in common if I'd been this Catholic when we met.


#14

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:13, topic:219157"]
I never said I considered myself anyone's "Special Prosecutor." I was wondering how to work it out when my own faith is the most important aspect of who I am, and my husband has not experienced the same thing and remains mostly an atheist although he does attend Mass and takes the Eucharist. I have not pushed my beliefs on him but there is a wide gulf in how we approach life, which is not easy. I know that it must make me sound as if I am in possession of "the truth," because I am the one who is trying to follow God's will. but I am trying not to put that aspect of my life into my marriage. I just don't know how to do that.

As far as the other subject, it does trouble me greatly that such hypocrisy can go on within our Church. I was shocked by it. I just assumed that all Catholics were as committed to life as we should be. But let's not turn this thread into another political discussion, it's not relevant.

My problem is how to ignore such a large part of myself and still find enough in common with my non-religious husband? It bothers him too, it's not just me, I know he wonders what happened because it's ME who has changed so much since we got married. We'd have had zero in common if I'd been this Catholic when we met.

[/quote]

If he is an atheist, why is he attending church and taking communion? I think starting your own thread might be a good idea. The issues here sound complicated.

I was raised devout Roman Catholic and part of why I spend time here is that I am considering returning but it would probably be to an Eastern Catholic church. For various reasons that seems better for me and it was the advice I got from a few people who thought I might someday come back to the Church (I've been gone about 20 years now). If I do this it may cause differences between me and my husband b/c he was also raised Roman Catholic and does not attend services and has not for a long time, and he may not be interested in going to church with me. But I would feel that being Roman Catholic by upbringing, he would know enough about the culture and etc. The issues involved in leaving and returning are complex.


#15

[quote="silentstar, post:14, topic:219157"]
If he is an atheist, why is he attending church and taking communion? I think starting your own thread might be a good idea. The issues here sound complicated.

I was raised devout Roman Catholic and part of why I spend time here is that I am considering returning but it would probably be to an Eastern Catholic church. For various reasons that seems better for me and it was the advice I got from a few people who thought I might someday come back to the Church (I've been gone about 20 years now). If I do this it may cause differences between me and my husband b/c he was also raised Roman Catholic and does not attend services and has not for a long time, and he may not be interested in going to church with me. But I would feel that being Roman Catholic by upbringing, he would know enough about the culture and etc. The issues involved in leaving and returning are complex.

[/quote]

Well we are both cradle Catholics. He was quite devout when young, but his parents got divorced when he was a young teen after he had prayed to God not to let them divorce because then they would go to hell. So then I think he got angry at God and just turned off, said "I'll do it all myself" and just cut himself off from the church. I say he's more of an atheist now because I asked him one night if he even believes in God and he couldn't answer me. I think he is confused and doesn't want to allow God back in because he'd have to make changes.

I lost my mother at age 10 and my convert father never took us back to Mass. We quit catechism too. I had my own spiritual journey all over the place, including witchcraft, paganism and Buddhism. When we met, neither of us were going to church (obviously) and I would not have told anyone I was a Catholic. I was always seeking, but never finding.

OK, I'll stop now and start a thread of my own, because it is kind of complicated.


#16

[quote="ThyKingdomCome, post:8, topic:219157"]
There are two issues happening here. One is the religious divide between you and his unwillingness to discuss faith. The other is the loss of closeness/friendship. Certainly they affect each other, but you can work on one while setting aside the other if need be. It sounds like he is refusing to attend to the faith aspect of your relationship, so I would suggest working on the other side. I'm betting that since you were not religious when you fell in love with him, you used to have things in common, interests that bonded you, that weren't related to religion. Heck, even really religious people have some secular interests. Why not go back to those things and rekindle those interests. Pray for him. Perhaps someday he will be open to having non-threatening conversations about his and your faith. But until then, show him your love by nurturing those things in your lives that either you still have in common, or that you can return to. If it needs to be said for him to go along say it. Let him know that you want to be close to him regardless of your faith differences, and that you want to work on your marriage/friendship in these other ways.

[/quote]

I think you are hitting the nail on the head. The problem is my secular interests have changed because they are influenced by my faith. I've lost that condescending attitude and sarcasm he thought was funny. I don't view intimacy as a form of entertainment anymore. I don't think things that are obscene or derogatory are funny anymore. I am not materialistic anymore. He wants my hobbies to be drinking alcohol, eating rich food, expensive fashion and beauty treatments, watching tv, punk music, making fun of people and trying to seduce him. He spends a lot of money trying to get me to be this certain way, and I am not anymore.

He totally blames the Catholic Church. I try to enjoy all this stuff that he is trying to make me enjoy so that he doesn't hate the Church, but it's not a treat, it's all the time and it's too much. I just want him to talk to me and spending time doing things with me, but he doesn't like talking anymore and would rather do things by himself.

I have been talking to him about this and he misses that connection too, so he is trying to make some changes. He wants me to do some things differently also, but I don't know if I can do the things he wants.


#17

[quote="kenofken, post:11, topic:219157"]
There's a few issues at play here and with the OP. Some of it has nothing to do with religion. If you were growing apart or not actively nurturing the relationship before one of you converted/reverted/got serious about your faith, the conversion is just one more factor at play. If youre love or relationship is really going to be conditioned on your partner sharing your beliefs, it's not really love. It's an arrangement.

[/quote]

That's what I don't get. Everything was great in my marriage before I became Catholic. Then he stopped talking to me about anything important (faith, money, raising the kids) and stopped spending time with me. Practically overnight. I thought he was just working too hard or something but he said he convinced himself that I wanted him to be a certain way and just started pretending to be someone he wasn't, until he blew up at me and said I changed and he didn't like anything I was interested in anymore.

[quote="MerryCatholic, post:12, topic:219157"]
yup. me. my husband was an athiest and an evulitionist before we married. we married at a civil wedding. i came back to the church a few years ago. my marriage was blessed in the church. my husband got conditionally baptized after going through catechism. 2 years later, he decided catholicism was not for him. he told me it was just an experiment. yes, ti hurt me really badly. he has also somewhat disconnected from me in the relationship to a point. we do not discuss religion anymore. he has an exceptionally negative attitude towards the Church after visiting apostate websites. i dont pray around him anymore. i do it in private when he is at work. satan almost ripped my marriage apart. but, i trusted in Jesus. and we are still married. the devil has a hold of my husbands soul believe me. he says terrible things about the Church and terrible things to me sometimes even when it comes to Jesus he has said sacreligious things. this is not something he did before he learned about Catholicism. he only started doing it when he got involved with a 20 year old girl and had a cyber affair. i found out about it, and soon after that he left the Church and started visiting terrible anti Catholic sites and spewed venom about the Church for a long time. i respectfully asked him numerous times not to talk about it in front of me. he started learning to respect my beliefs. i think its a miracle that we are still married. i did not want a divorce because i love him, and we decided to make it work. but to this day, he occasionally tried to spew some anti catholic venom at me,.he only does it when he is visiting anti catholic sites. i honestly dont know what that girl told him when he was cyber flirting with her. but it had an enormous impact on him. obviously. i have never seen anyone in my life spew such venom about the Church. God really has a lot of crosses for me to bear, and this is a mighty big one. iam greatful we dont argue. very.

[/quote]

My husband would say the same sorts of things if he spoke his mind about the Church. I don't understand why they have to hate the Church so much. I pray that if it is demonic influence that God will remove it. :crossrc:

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:13, topic:219157"]
I never said I considered myself anyone's "Special Prosecutor." I was wondering how to work it out when my own faith is the most important aspect of who I am, and my husband has not experienced the same thing and remains mostly an atheist although he does attend Mass and takes the Eucharist. I have not pushed my beliefs on him but there is a wide gulf in how we approach life, which is not easy. I know that it must make me sound as if I am in possession of "the truth," because I am the one who is trying to follow God's will. but I am trying not to put that aspect of my life into my marriage. I just don't know how to do that.

My problem is how to ignore such a large part of myself and still find enough in common with my non-religious husband? It bothers him too, it's not just me, I know he wonders what happened because it's ME who has changed so much since we got married. We'd have had zero in common if I'd been this Catholic when we met.

[/quote]

My husband attends Mass, but does not receive communion (even when the priest tries to force him). And we have similar politics, but this totally speaks to me. For me I guess it is because Christ is the center of my life and not my husband anymore. I guess he feels abandoned. I never tried to force him to change, but I don't go long with all of his ideas anymore.


#18

[quote="OneAugustKnight, post:1, topic:219157"]
I converted to Catholicism from secularism about 3 years ago. My husband is a fallen away Catholic who considers himself a Muslim, because he doesn't believe Jesus is God. He seems to have mentally disengaged from our relationship. Any converts have similar experiences?

[/quote]

I converted from a Protestantism to Catholicism this year. My wife didn't. This was a huge conversion and change in direction and focus for me, which I attribute to the Holy Spirit, Our Lady's intercession, and many prayers of known and unknown persons that may have been praying for me. I guess my wife didn't get the same thing because she isn't interested in converting to Catholic Christianity. I have obligations to attend Mass every Sunday and Holy Day, and contribute to the support of the Church, which I didn't have before and can't really be comprimised.


#19

[quote="OneAugustKnight, post:16, topic:219157"]
I think you are hitting the nail on the head. The problem is my secular interests have changed because they are influenced by my faith. I've lost that condescending attitude and sarcasm he thought was funny. I don't view intimacy as a form of entertainment anymore. I don't think things that are obscene or derogatory are funny anymore. I am not materialistic anymore. He wants my hobbies to be drinking alcohol, eating rich food, expensive fashion and beauty treatments, watching tv, punk music, making fun of people and trying to seduce him. He spends a lot of money trying to get me to be this certain way, and I am not anymore.

He totally blames the Catholic Church. I try to enjoy all this stuff that he is trying to make me enjoy so that he doesn't hate the Church, but it's not a treat, it's all the time and it's too much. I just want him to talk to me and spending time doing things with me, but he doesn't like talking anymore and would rather do things by himself.

I have been talking to him about this and he misses that connection too, so he is trying to make some changes. He wants me to do some things differently also, but I don't know if I can do the things he wants.

[/quote]

I'm right there with you, sister in Christ. My husband will tell me that I must think I am God or something, because I believe in having rules for life based on what God wants us to do and what the Church teaches. We've never lived a hedonistic lifestyle, but there is a lot of entertainment that I just cannot support any more (most Hollywood movies). Trying to live like Christ would have me to live means that I don't act like a lot of the secular world. I would love for my husband to join me and return to his faith, but I'm not counting on it. We just seem not to have a lot in common these days.


#20

It sounds like you feel like you are a completely different person now than you were then. But you know, that can't be true. You are still the same person, just with a different set of morals. It may be hard, especially when you are close to that conversion, but there have got to be things about the person you "were" that are not so bad. In fact, I suspect that as time goes, you will start to recognize some of those things again - and if you are able to recognize and appreciate what was good from your past, hopefully they will pop back into your life in positive ways.

If you used to drink to drunkenness, then maybe you shouldn't continue with that, but there's nothing intrinsically wrong with rich food and beauty treatments, and a couple of beers or nice wine. And if they are vehicles to fostering a good relationship with your dh, then they might actually be GOOD things. Distinguish between the things that are clearly defined as WRONG by the church, and things that are morally neutral. Even if you don't have the desire for them anymore because you are being filled spiritually, you can still enjoy them with your dh.

Even punk music - is it actually immoral beyond, say, regular pop music? While the ideal scenario would be listening only to morally uplifting music at all times, if there aren't kids listening and writing down the words, I'd be easygoing about the message in the songs my dh wanted to listen to. I'd draw the line at extreme profanity or the occult, but otherwise, it is one of those things I'd not need to always jump on. Hey if you liked the style of music before, surely it can be tolerable to listen to now and then. If I'm naive about that style of music, and it is pure satanist or something, then definitely try to find something else that you and he can agree on.

Is there a hobby you could take up together? Something active? Jogging, biking, bowling....sport games on the Wii. The reality is that since you are the one who changed, you bear the burden of finding some things that are common ground - even if they are not as fun for you as they are for him.

What I would encourage you to consider is this: is it possible that in your zeal for your newfound faith, you are pushing those things of the world away harder than you need to? Is it possible that you are so excited about what you've found that you are judging your dh's secular interests too harshly? Are you judging these things outloud, when he's not ready to hear it, thus putting him on the defensive? I don't know if you are doing those things, but I know that it is a common pitfall of people who have converted/found faith. I did it, and I've seen other people do it often. Excitement for the truth can sometimes put you up on a cloud so high that you lose touch with the world. It's a great feeling, but it's not necessarily the best way to be a witness for Christ.


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