I feel a bit ashamed


#1

I proud of my religion all it accept for the inquisition. my mum is an athesist, and some times i play my hand at trying to make my belief reasonable and logical, so her mind can assimalate the information and possibly try to believe in god. her favorate defense in this case is," The church use to burn people", or, why is thier so much evil in this world, is god weak or just plain evil" I easly give awnsers and defence for why thier is evil in the world and why god allows it to exist. but i fail to give defend god in terms of being a catholic, because of the inquisitions. can sombody please ease the torments of my mind and give some kind of reasonable defense, because i love being a catholic and i dont want the inquisition to be a weight on my shoulders. :frowning:


#2

The Inquisitions are a vastly misunderstood and misrepresented aspect of Church history. They were perhaps one of my bigger stumbling blocks until I studied them more, and found them to actually be a GOOD thing, a light during a dark time, rather than a bad.

For example, did you know that the Inquisitions were the foundation of trial courts? That they actually enforced a limitation on the use of torture, which was otherwise rampant in secular “justice”? That they established the use of witness evaluation, discarding testimonies that were biased or unreliable (the even went so far as to not accept any testimony from people who were known enemies of the accused). That the Inquisitions served to CLEAR people of charges, rather than persecute? These are just a few of the things that I learned from SECULAR studies of the Inquisitions, not just Catholic ones. It’s also important to remember that the Spanish Inquisition is not called Spanish just because of where it occured; it was actually under the Spanish government and not the Church.

For some resources, you can start on this very website. Here is a short bit of general information on the Inquisitions in general. I will see if I can find articles online from the secular investigation of the Inquisition archives a few years back. The findings of the investigation were startling in that they revealed that most of what we “know” about the Inquisitions is actually myth, primarily fabricated by Protestant polemists. The various Inquisitions kept meticulous records of their procedures, the people tried, and what they were accused of, in addition to written testimonies. It made for a very easy paper trail to follow, and the information gathered has led to a pretty radical re-envisioning of the Inquisitions over the past couple years.

Peace and God bless!


#3

Although it is certainly possible to make a “little” light of some of the goings-on of members of the Church during various times, it’s most important to respond to attacks on the Church that are grounded in the sins of its members with a simple “What’s your point? Is it a Catholic requirement to not be human?” We need to establish the fact that the Church is the home of SINNERS and as such, you will will find things such as burnings, tortures, you name it. Luckily, the Church is not just the home of sinners, but the means for sinners to seek help through the Christ’s established Church and her Sacraments. Although the Church does offer cleansing through baptism and reconciliation, it does not act as a Brita filter, somehow removing all impurities from those who call themselves “Catholic.”


#4

Have a look at The Real Inquisition.
Pax tecum


#5

[quote=Church Militant]Have a look at The Real Inquisition.
Pax tecum
[/quote]

THANK YOU! That’s the investigation I was thinking of. Totally flipped the scholarly conception of the Inquisition on its ear, even though the process started years before. It was that study that killed the “Inquisition Problem” for me, in fact turning me into a supporter of the Inquisition (as a development, not in the sense that I’d want it in the same form today).

We can thank the Inquisition for fair trials, impartial laws, and the “rule of law”. The Inquisitions, and the legal apparatus they encouraged, are practically foundational for the concept of judicial practice and fair application of law.

Peace and God bless!


#6

" Rebuilding a Lost Faith is a great and famous apologetics book in defense of the truth of the Catholic Faith. It is written as the spiritual odyssey of the author, John L. Stoddard - showing how he lost his faith in Christianity as a Protestant seminary student, became before long an agnostic, and finally after 40 years, through the grace of God, was “forced” to search once more for religious truth, with the result that he finally became a Catholic. "


#7

[quote=Daniel Marsh]" Rebuilding a Lost Faith is a great and famous apologetics book in defense of the truth of the Catholic Faith. It is written as the spiritual odyssey of the author, John L. Stoddard - showing how he lost his faith in Christianity as a Protestant seminary student, became before long an agnostic, and finally after 40 years, through the grace of God, was “forced” to search once more for religious truth, with the result that he finally became a Catholic. "
[/quote]

Rome Sweet Home is my book of taste. :wink:


#8

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