I found this powerful image on Pinterest about a woman healing from post-abortive grief


#1

We should never back down from our fiery anti-abortion stances, but while we are condemning the sin, let us not forget to proclaim love and forgiveness to the sinner. Our religion is, after all, based on forgiveness rather than condemnation. We need to let post-abortive women know that if they repent, Jesus’ mercy will cover them.

I thought this was a moving image and wanted to share.


#2

I think that’s a beautiful image…Jesus holding the baby moves me to tears. Let’s pray for all the babies that are cast aside or lost to miscarriages and still-births.

We do need to remember to welcome the mothers (and fathers) who have been hurt through abortion that forgiveness and healing can be found in Jesus.

May the women who have aborted find peace and forgiveness in Christ, and may all mothers who have lost a baby find comfort today that Jesus is cherishing their precious child and not one of them is forgotten by the Father.


#3

Forgiveness after abortion is possible but it is not common. Don’t forget that the baby cries out to God for vengeance and God promises to avenge, in Hell or in Purgatory.


#4

Presuming God will not often forgive a repentant sinner, when that’s simply not the case in Christianity.

If you’re going to argue against Catholic doctrine, it’s important to do so in a way that does justice to that doctrine.

Jesus Christ died to atone for ALL sins so that ALL people might have the opportunity to go to chose the fulfillment of eternal beatitude in heaven (John 3:16-17; 1 Pet. 3:9).

In addition, sins that cry out to heaven for vengeance do not mean that one has who committed such sins cannot be forgiven.

The only unforgivable sin is final impenitence (CCC 1864). Further, mercy can sometimes be redemptively severe, as can analogously surgery or rehab after an injury. In other words, the purgative process–whether on earth or in heaven–is lovingly designed to purge unhealthy attachments that diminish a person and thus impede their true fulfillment in God (see CCC 1030-32; 1471-73). And so purgation can be redemptively painful. Thus, in a sense that the rock group Nazareth might not have considered, “Love hurts” sometimes.


#5

Presuming God will not often forgive a repentant sinner, when that’s simply not the case in Christianity.

If you’re going to argue against Catholic doctrine on the CA Forums, you need to do so in a way that does justice to that doctrine.

Jesus Christ died to atone for ALL sins so that ALL people might have the opportunity to go to chose the fulfillment of eternal beatitude in heaven (John 3:16-17; 1 Pet. 3:9).

In addition, sins that cry out for vengeance do not mean that one has who committed such sins cannot be forgiven. The only unforgivable sin is final impenitence (CCC 1864). Further, mercy can sometimes be redemptively severe, as can analogously surgery or rehab after an injury. In other words, the purgative process–whether on earth or in heaven–is lovingly designed to purge unhealthy attachments that diminish a person has and thus impede their true fulfillment in God (see CCC 1030-32; 1471-73). And so purgation can be redemptively painful. Thus, in a sense that the rock group Nazareth might not have considered, “Love hurts” sometimes.


#6

Every sincerely repented sin is forgiven


#7

That is an extremely unhelpful attitude. God will forgive any repentent sinner. Your harsh attitude would drive women seeking forgiveness away from the Church.


#8

that is very compelling; nice job


#9

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